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In my view, running in FWA all the time is counter productive. It increases tire wear, adversely impacts turn radius (unless it's a bi-speed turn axle) and places undue wear and strain on components. You don't 'throw' my tractors into FWA, you do it carefully. All I have to do is observe the tire lugs and ruts to determine if FWA is prudent. Most times it's not.
 

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I never run the tractor in AWD and will never do it. Of course mine is 2WD:). The one time I got stuck in my yanmar 2wd I just used the FEL to walk me out of the bog.

Really don’t think it’s rocket science….I watch where I’m driving and if in buggy or truck and see a need, then I go to 4wd….steep inclines or declines, muddy areas or slippery conditions such as moldy boat ramps. If I’m in 2wd vehicle then I don’t drive thru those areas. Not being ugly, but life isn’t as hard as we seem to make it out to be.
 

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So your line in the sand is legalized MJ? And the distinctive froth at the mouth is worse because of MJ than Fentanyl? Lastly, getting shot in the face by a harmless MJ dealer is an oxymoron. :)
Nope….line in the sand is dope is dope. Here marijuana is illegal and I agree that it should be. It does has medicinal use and if needed for that purpose then it’s legal with prescription….same with fentanyl, it’s legal if prescribed and with medical purpose….same with morphine.

There are those who view marijuana dealers as harmless, which is BS.
 

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There are those who view marijuana dealers as harmless, which is BS.
Kinda like livestock confinement setups. They are fine as long as they aren't in my backyard. :)

1000 times more people will die this year from Nicotine use than THC. :)
 

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I never run the tractor in AWD and will never do it. Of course mine is 2WD:). The one time I got stuck in my yanmar 2wd I just used the FEL to walk me out of the bog.

Really don’t think it’s rocket science….I watch where I’m driving and if in buggy or truck and see a need, then I go to 4wd….steep inclines or declines, muddy areas or slippery conditions such as moldy boat ramps. If I’m in 2wd vehicle then I don’t drive thru those areas. Not being ugly, but life isn’t as hard as we seem to make it out to be.
Actually, I do the same. Isn't the bucket supposed to be used for removing you from a sticky situation? The only time I use front wheel assist is when pulling something and I gert wheel slip. Don't believe I've ever locked the differentials (I can lock both the rear and the front for true 4 wheel drive. In reality with open diffs in a tractor, you only have 2 wheel drive anyway. One wheel in the back and one in the front. In my view, the term 4wd or AWD isn't correct no matter if it's a awd car or pickup truck or tractor. All 2wd unless they have locking diffs. Power is always transmitted to the wheel that has the least resistance, not the wheel that has the most.

Only reason I have FWA tractors is because I'm not sure why except it 'appeared' to be a good idea when I bought them and the resale is better as well.
 

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Had a friend with a 1964 GMC Suburban, rear whek drive ( an ambulance in it's early days) and it had posi-traction. Chained up, that thing would go pretty much anywhere a 4 x 4 would go!
My land is fairly flat, although rugged in the back 60. I use Front wheel assist most of the time because most of my work with it involves the front end loader. Also use the diff lock I I start to spin picking up sand or gravel, for instance. This past summer is one of the first times I did not used the front wheel assist much at all. This year I see lots of digging and clearing again.
 

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Most vehicles, unless you order limited slip will come with an open diff. My pickup truck has an ARB air locker in the front and a Detroit Tru-Track in the back and it will go about anywhere too. I rarely use the ARB except when getting into out up north property as it's only access is a seasonal road with a water crossing and it's hilly.

I like the ARB because it's selectable. full open or locked. The Tru-Track isn't. and you can 'feel' it on dry pavement. It came with open front and rear, well the back was limited slip which I'm not overly impressed with. Limited slip is a clutch pack whereas a Tru-Track is 100% mechanical. Has manual locking front hubs too. I can completely disengage the front end and not constantly turn components in the front end.
 

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Only thing I have that’s true 4x4 is my Bobcat UTV….I can select 1wd, 2wd and 4wd…I’ve test it by raising it and running in 4wd and all four are spinning. Got to be carful as it has tractor style lug tires (with Kevlar) and they will chew up the grass if you are turning.

My truck says 4wd but it’s a lie….it has limited slip in rear only so if slipping at most is 3wd….but works fine for my use. I’ve had others tell me 2wd is all that’s needed, but they never leave pavement nor have they been to a boat ramp. My old trucks had the manual lockers with solid axle front just like the rear.
 

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If you go back to the original terminology; such as 4x2, 4x4, 6x2,6x4,and 6x6.
The second number refereed to the number of powered axles a 4 x 2 being 4 axled vehicle with 2 powered axles,
ie, a 2wd truck, the 4 x 4 being a 4 axled vehicle with all 4 powered and so on.

To say that your 4wd is only a 2 or 3 wheel drive is completely inaccurate a 4wd pickup in 4wd is delivering power to all
4 wheels, you can be stuck with 2 tires spinning but all 4 wheels have the same amount of torque being applied to them.
The tires may not be getting the traction needed to move the vehicle but they are all powered.
 

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Have to take issue with that Lou. With open differentials, the power is directed to the wheel/tire assembly with the LEAST traction. Why a limited slip or locking differential is a viable option for adverse conditions, consequently, with open differentials a 4 wheel drive is really a 2 wheel drive, one wheel in front and one in the back. Easy to prove as well. If you have open differentials jack one side of a vehicle up in the front and rear and the wheel off the ground will rotate, while the wheel with ground contact won't.
 

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Have to take issue with that Lou. With open differentials, the power is directed to the wheel/tire assembly with the LEAST traction. Why a limited slip or locking differential is a viable option for adverse conditions, consequently, with open differentials a 4 wheel drive is really a 2 wheel drive, one wheel in front and one in the back. Easy to prove as well. If you have open differentials jack one side of a vehicle up in the front and rear and the wheel off the ground will rotate, while the wheel with ground contact won't.
Yep. In the offroad internet world this gets discussed to death. Not to get too technical, but, actually all four wheels are pulling until the load is such to cause the wheel with the least traction to spin. If it's a front wheel that loses traction first the vehicle is then being pulled by both rear wheels and however much resistance the spinning front wheel can produce. If this isn't enough to propel the vehicle then the rear wheel with least traction spins. If there's still no forward movement you are basically 2wd. This concept ws the motivator for axle companies to offer limit slip first. Then later true lockers.
 
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My understanding is that if you do have one back wheel spinning, you can slowly engage the park brake until there is enough resistance on the spinning wheel to let the other wheel with grip to pull.
 

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My understanding is that if you do have one back wheel spinning, you can slowly engage the park brake until there is enough resistance on the spinning wheel to let the other wheel with grip to pull.
This concept applies the philosophy that you will apply resistance to the wheel with the least traction and distribute that resistance to the other wheel which in theory will move the vehicle forward.

I believe this is effective if it requires just slightly more traction than what's available to move the vehicle.

Worthy, but minimally effective.
 

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Have to take issue with that Lou. With open differentials, the power is directed to the wheel/tire assembly with the LEAST traction. Why a limited slip or locking differential is a viable option for adverse conditions, consequently, with open differentials a 4 wheel drive is really a 2 wheel drive, one wheel in front and one in the back. Easy to prove as well. If you have open differentials jack one side of a vehicle up in the front and rear and the wheel off the ground will rotate, while the wheel with ground contact won't.
Nope, both wheels will be receiving the same amount of torque if it exceeds the available traction to either tire the tire with the least traction will spin,
but they both will have the same amount of torque applied.
Jacking up a wheel on each powered axle set simply reduces the amount of torque needed to rotate that tire so that is all that the engine will develop.
You could do that and with the engine off and the transmission in neutral rotate that tire by hand, the amount of effort required to rotate those wheels in all the torque that the drivetrain will develop when powered, will that be enough to move the vehicle, I doubt it.

As far as applying the parking brake to get a bit more traction to get moving, it did work a bit on the older vehicles. But it won't work on the newer ones with the electrically applied parking brake.
Making me think and wonder now, I'll have to dig out my manual and see if it's still called an Emergency Brake or only a Parking Brake.
 

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The only other thing to look at is every so often, probably at least once a month, you need to shift it out of 4 wheel drive and into to 2 wheel drive to exercise the linkage and stuff..... Several posts on here and I have seen it several times myself that a tractor will get stuck in 4 wheel drive if it is left this way for long periods of time......It can be a bear and take some work to get them out of 4 wheel drive......

Just another angle on this question.....
The reason it's hard to disconnect 4WD is because of tension in the system which is caused by unequal rotation requirement rear/front.
 

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If I'm always going to be driving on dirt, would there ever be a need to not engage 4x4 traction?

Thank you.
Whats the problem with disconnecting it when not needed?

Waitaminit,, you aren't talking about disconnecting the hubs are you? If you are then Yes you may as well leave them connected instead of stopping and getting out of the vehicle.
 

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Et; oops, resurrected a zombie.
I leave em in 4x4, and only shift out for road running. The 1 machine primarily does loader work. The other one runs only soft ground, has a loader as well, but not loaded tires. It might make sense to shift to 2wd when running the brush cutter, but grasses won't bind up the driveline. Another point in favor of 4x4 is that it reduces the turning radius vs. 2wd.
 
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