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I found 2 used tractors locally. The owner is away for the next week or so, and the fella that showed them to me knew very little including what the price was. There was an Ingersoll 446 and I asked about that one in the Ingersoll forum. The other is a Deere 216. I know this has the variator drive with a manual tranny, and a big iron Kohler that I am very familiar with. I've run these but never owned one. Anything special to check out before I buy? How to check the tranny if the engine is dead? Where do I listen for "bad" noises? Will jacking the rear up and putting it in gear not running tell me anything? The machine is rough looking cosmetically and I'm guessing that it is gonna be rough internally too. I just don't want to get something to fix that would have been better off left sleeping. This especially hard as I won't know what price he is asking for a week and a half. Right now I'm leaning toward the Ingersoll, because it looks much better, but I'm reasonably familiar with the Deere and it IS green:D
 

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Joe,
Though I'm a Deere man through and through, if the 216 is in rough shape, I would lean towards the 446 (love those big rear tires).

On the 200 series, the most consistent annoyances are the variators. They can be troublesome if the previous owner neglected to perform maintenance on it. I've seen where the tractor wouldn't move because the variator needed adjusting or the center pulley needed lubed. Never had trouble with the transaxle or the gears on my 214 or my old 110 (same tranny) so can't be of much help here. Next question would be the PTO engagement. This one being a 216 which came out, I believe in 1979, probably would have the electric PTO, so you might check it's condition as well as the deck spindles, deck shell, etc.

Checking the tranny without the engine, shift through each gear to be sure there is no pin or spring broken. Pushed it around to be sure nothings locked up. Go through the variator lever range, especially if the engine runs, as I said the variators can be a sticking point on these things.

Hope this info helps.
 

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Originally posted by treed
Joe,
Though I'm a Deere man through and through, if the 216 is in rough shape, I would lean towards the 446 (love those big rear tires).

On the 200 series, the most consistent annoyances are the variators. They can be troublesome if the previous owner neglected to perform maintenance on it. I've seen where the tractor wouldn't move because the variator needed adjusting or the center pulley needed lubed. Never had trouble with the transaxle or the gears on my 214 or my old 110 (same tranny) so can't be of much help here. Next question would be the PTO engagement. This one being a 216 which came out, I believe in 1979, probably would have the electric PTO, so you might check it's condition as well as the deck spindles, deck shell, etc.

Checking the tranny without the engine, shift through each gear to be sure there is no pin or spring broken. Pushed it around to be sure nothings locked up. Go through the variator lever range, especially if the engine runs, as I said the variators can be a sticking point on these things.

Hope this info helps.
hey treed what some problems that the 200 series had in the past l would like to know so if l run in to the problem l can fix it the only problem l had was a brokeing motor mount
 

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Originally posted by bontai Joe
I found 2 used tractors locally. The owner is away for the next week or so, and the fella that showed them to me knew very little including what the price was. There was an Ingersoll 446 and I asked about that one in the Ingersoll forum. The other is a Deere 216. I know this has the variator drive with a manual tranny, and a big iron Kohler that I am very familiar with. I've run these but never owned one. Anything special to check out before I buy? How to check the tranny if the engine is dead? Where do I listen for "bad" noises? Will jacking the rear up and putting it in gear not running tell me anything? The machine is rough looking cosmetically and I'm guessing that it is gonna be rough internally too. I just don't want to get something to fix that would have been better off left sleeping. This especially hard as I won't know what price he is asking for a week and a half. Right now I'm leaning toward the Ingersoll, because it looks much better, but I'm reasonably familiar with the Deere and it IS green:D
got any pics
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No pics, I am still waiting for the guy to get home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
jbetts,
The 216 is a pretty ratty looking tractor. The hood was busted up, seat was trashed, a fair amount of rust on what I could see. It's in the back of a barn with about 5 years of stuff stacked up around and in front of it. I'm getting antsy about when the owner is getting back. I was able to get a decent look at the Ingersoll 446 and it looks better cosmetically, but I have no idea if it runs, and my wife will justifiably shoot me if bring home a tractor that needs a $1500 motor. I just bought a motor for the tractor I bought last spring. No way will I get approval for another motor. She wants to see it running when it comes home and has made that VERY clear. I'm hoping to get one of these 2 machines pretty cheap. I'll let you know what happens.
 

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l would get the deere just because l like deeres if you can get them for cheap l would get the both
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
jbetts13,
This guy does have a 3rd tractor... a Deere 316, but it looks like it was on the losing side of a war. I've been trying to put it out of my mind because of it's condition, but I can't help wondering how cool it would be to have three 316s. I know I'll be asking about that one too. I've only got authorization from the treasurer for one purchase, so I gotta pick wisely.

Looking at a map, you are only about 8-9 hours drive from me. Are you interested in what I find out? You could come down with a pickup truck and add to your collection:D
 

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l would but my mom does not and where or what state in he in l'm im Canada ont how far is that
 

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ops it said me not him whats the price if you could drive have way may be she mite :D :D then we can meet
 

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Originally posted by bontai Joe
jbetts13,
This guy does have a 3rd tractor... a Deere 316, but it looks like it was on the losing side of a war. I've been trying to put it out of my mind because of it's condition, but I can't help wondering how cool it would be to have three 316s. I know I'll be asking about that one too. I've only got authorization from the treasurer for one purchase, so I gotta pick wisely.

Looking at a map, you are only about 8-9 hours drive from me. Are you interested in what I find out? You could come down with a pickup truck and add to your collection:D
do you have any pics of your two Deeres
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm in north-eastern Pennsylvania near Stroudsburg. I'm guessing about 425 miles (680 km?) eastsoutheast of you. As for pics of mine, I have one here at work. This is my 1978 316 that I bought in March of 1979 and still use at my mom's house. It was repainted by with me with spray cans 15 years ago. Still runs great, but could use a cosmetic sprucing up.

<img src=http://www.hpphoto.com/servlet/LinkPhoto?GUID=346282de-25f6-ef09-5976-3acb2b0268f8&size=>
 

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l would like to look at the 216 and 316 but it is alittle far if you can get some pics prices l would be thankful
 

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Sorry, jbetts for not getting back to you sooner.

The 200 series are pretty much bullet-proof. The design actually draws a lot from the original Deere 110, same transaxle, same family of Kohler engines, and in fact, some attachments for the later 110/112 can mount up to the 200 series. The only thing that might be a problem, but that might be stretching calling it a problem, are the variators. That's only because they need preventative maintenance, but usually go ignored. You really can't go wrong with a 200 series as long as it was properly maintained, but that can be said of every piece of equipment. It's just that the 200 series can take more abuse than most.
 

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Originally posted by treed
Sorry, jbetts for not getting back to you sooner.

The 200 series are pretty much bullet-proof. The design actually draws a lot from the original Deere 110, same transaxle, same family of Kohler engines, and in fact, some attachments for the later 110/112 can mount up to the 200 series. The only thing that might be a problem, but that might be stretching calling it a problem, are the variators. That's only because they need preventative maintenance, but usually go ignored. You really can't go wrong with a 200 series as long as it was properly maintained, but that can be said of every piece of equipment. It's just that the 200 series can take more abuse than most.
ok l give whats a or are variators??????????
 

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Variator or Variable Speed control is described by Deere in the original ads as: "Peerless three speed transmission with speed variator that allowed slowing the tractor without interrupting power to the driven equipment." Note: the original 63' 110 had a 3-speed transmission, later ones had a 4-speed transmission.

Here's a poor depiction of the drive system of a 110 tractor. It will be the same for the 200 series. Notice an extra set of pulleys between the engine and transaxle. This is the variator and it's control by a lever, which acts as a pendulum. The lever moves the secondary belt from various diameters of the variator pulley, either slowing down or speeding up the tractor, regardless which gear your transmission is in. In other words, you can almost hand pick a speed to match whatever task you are doing.
 

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o l get ya in your other post you said the need preventative maintenance what kind of maintenance are to talking about ?????????
 

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Bascially keeping the center sheave (pulley) lubricated, as well as the lever mechanism, including the shaft. There are grease fittings for the variator system that goes unnoticed. Applying a little lubricant to the center pulley also keeps the system functioning as advertised.
 
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