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Hey everyone, first post. My wife and I recently purchased my families 60+ acre homestead/farm in Washington, near Mt. St. Helens. I'm looking for recommendations on a tractor to help me out around the place. I'm pretty much a tractor novice but I'll tell you what my needs are:

* 20-30 acres of hay field that need to be hayed/mowed each year.
* Ability to be able to make and handle round bales in the future.
* General Land clearing and site prep. We will be logging part of the property and building a shop/barn.
* We will be putting in a new driveway and parking space. (I'm not exactly sure how good a tractor loader is for putting in a road and dozing earth.
*Grading road/driveway intermittently.

The tractor will primarily be used for putting in the hay each year, but upfront we have quite a few projects that a front end loader and implements will be useful for.

From my limited research it seems like I'm looking at a Utility or Compact Utility sized tractor to get the jobs done but I will let you experienced folks advise me! We will be living here for the rest of our lives so I would like to invest in a tractor that will serve me for many years reliably. Preferably new but If i can find a good used deal then great. I would like to keep the price under $40K. What are your recommendations for brand and model? I really appreciate the help, Thanks,

Wyant
 

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Welcome to the Forum. From the duties you describe, I would be looking at a tractor in the 50 HP range. Better to buy a little more than you need rather than less. There are many good older tractors on the market right now from Ford, Massey Ferguson, and Case. There are a few JD, but most have high hours and a higher price. Many have FELs at about 40% of the cost of buying a new FEL, but they usually need some repair work. Buying a good used tractor gives a major benefit over a new tractor in that you can get all the implements you need and the tractor for less than a new tractor alone.

I have a 68 yr old NAA, 33 HP, and a 50 yr old 4000, 55 HP, that are both in very good mechanical condition and should last many more years if properly maintained. Tractors are built a lot better than vehicles and will last an awfully long time. The older ones seem to me are built very tough, as witnessed by the shear number that are still daily working tractors. The sheet metal alone is from 11 ga to 14 ga steel, versus the thinner 18-20 ga used on the newer stuff. I don't care for the plastic at all. Cold weather plus an oops makes a replacement necessary. With steel, you hammer out the dent, add a little paint and go on. All the sheet metal on both tractors is original. It has been repaired several times, but still going strong.
 

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The baling equipment will be what sets the requirements. Some round bale stuff is pretty minimal, but that's not the equipment that you'll be looking for. A 50hp tractor with loader will move the round bales, but probably isnt enough to form them with reasonable balers.

50hp might be fine for the cutting and taking, but might not be as well. Like I said; it all comes down to the equipment.

I might be inclined to start with something bid and old, 2wd and no loader, along with a CUT or UT. Dad's yanmar yt359r seems like a real nice piece of equipment. It was $31K with a loader a few years back. I was trying to get him into a used bobcat 5610 as he is over 70 and I figured it would be a better long term machine for him, but he really does not like buying used, and new they over $60k.

Research the haying equipment first, then ask about a tractor.

You might even ask a neighbor that already has all the equipment for a price to turn your field into round bales.
 

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I'm thinking same thing....50hp range in a CUT model. Will handle round bales, the drive and options galore on attachments.

May be best to have some do the bailing as that equipment can be pricey for that small acreage.

The topo of property will determine if 4wd is needed. If hilly, go with 4wd. There are quality used models out there and you get into a ford vs Chevy debate real quick. I found a 2014 kubota mx5200 this year for 14500 with less than 100 hours...that was with a front end loader, skid steer quick attach.....but mine is 2wd and no aux hydraulics in rear. I dont need it, but it can be added.

Kioti has good reviews and JD is pricier but good machines.
 

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Another thing to consider about haying equipment; when I was looking at old square balers, not only was there a minimum HP required, there was also an effective minimum weight required. With only 60 acres, I would think you would want to at least consider square bales.
 

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What did your family use when they farmed it, That would be some guidance.

Are you sure you want to get into the haying business? If it were me I would have a custom hay operation take care of that portion of the operation.
 

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Most round balers will require at least 70-80 horsepower. If new, I would look into a Massey Ferguson 5700 series. You could get geared up for all your haying equipment at around $15000 for used equipment. There are a lot of good older tractors that will work well. Ford 5600 series, Massey Ferguson 300 series, Case IH 5200 series, Allis Chalmers 6000 series, Deere 5000 series, White 2-80.
 

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honestly, I would probably trust a used tractor more than a used baler. There is just so much stuff to wear, and round balers are relatively new technology.
I can't think all the haying equipment would ever pay for itself on such a small farm though.
I have seen some smaller round baling stuff out there though. I'm not sure what you get out of oddball undersized bales though.
 

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There's more to haying than just the machinery tho. How the finished hay to be stored and marketed.

The time it takes to mow, rake, and bale in coherence with weather takes considerable intrusion on other projects in life.

Haying like dairy is a commitment!
 

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There's more to haying than just the machinery tho. How the finished hay to be stored and marketed.

The time it takes to mow, rake, and bale in coherence with weather takes considerable intrusion on other projects in life.

Haying like dairy is a commitment!
I'm going to go out on a limb and assume the reason he is set on round bales is that he doesn't have a place to store them.

Silage might be a better option for feed. One of the farmers I work with grows corn, and chops it all up, stalk, leaves, cob, ears, to use as silage. Most silage operations I see make big plastic covered snakes. Not too many farmers use actual silos these days (so they are cheap if you want one). It strikes me as a less "picky" way of growing feed for cows, especially in what I assume to be a pretty wet climate, but looks like it might require a bit more HP.

Keep your options open.
 

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My wife and I recently purchased my families 60+ acre homestead/farm ... I'm pretty much a tractor novice but I'll tell you what my needs are:

* 20-30 acres of hay field that need to be hayed/mowed each year.
* Ability to be able to make and handle round bales in the future.
* General Land clearing and site prep. We will be logging part of the property and building a shop/barn.
* We will be putting in a new driveway and parking space. (I'm not exactly sure how good a tractor loader is for putting in a road and dozing earth.
*Grading road/driveway intermittently.

The tractor will primarily be used for putting in the hay each year, but upfront we have quite a few projects that a front end loader and implements will be useful for.

Wyant
Welcome Wyant,

I would concur with many here about having a 45Hp to 60Hp CUT machine.

Other than the hay work, logging itself tends to be more specialized. A Front End Loader (FEL) could have the bucket swapped out for a GRAPPLE. This is like a massive claw/jaws to pick of lumber piles with ease and move them elsewhere in no time at all vs. a 3PT boom with chains that would eat up much of a person's day one or two logs at a time.

Like Goo mentioned and Winston may too, a Bobcat CT450 with loader+grapple could be a solution.

Yanmar has the EX450 in the same range too. The Yanmar EF453 could be an option as it was last produced in 2019. Bet there are still clearance model packages of these out there too.

Mitsubishi/Mahindra has the GA550.

Much of what was mentioned are rather current or really recent units.

You can poke around this site when someone gives you a suggestion too ...
https://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/index.html
 

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Welcome Wyant,

I would concur with many here about having a 45Hp to 60Hp CUT machine.

Other than the hay work, logging itself tends to be more specialized. A Front End Loader (FEL) could have the bucket swapped out for a GRAPPLE. This is like a massive claw/jaws to pick of lumber piles with ease and move them elsewhere in no time at all vs. a 3PT boom with chains that would eat up much of a person's day one or two logs at a time.

Like Goo mentioned and Winston may too, a Bobcat CT450 with loader+grapple could be a solution.

Yanmar has the EX450 in the same range too. The Yanmar EF453 could be an option as it was last produced in 2019. Bet there are still clearance model packages of these out there too.

Mitsubishi/Mahindra has the GA550.

Much of what was mentioned are rather current or really recent units.

You can poke around this site when someone gives you a suggestion too ...
https://www.tractordata.com/farm-tractors/index.html
I was suggesting a tool-cat. Basically a cross between a side by side and a tractor with a full cab and loads of hydraulic power. Municipalities like them. Easy in and out. 2 seats. FEL. The 5610 has a 3 point. The 5600 has a dump bed, but 3 point kits exist. About 100hp IIRC. The downside is that the FEL doesn't lift real high and the 5610s pto is a hydraulic motor, so it makes only about 60hp at the PTO.
 

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The 5610 has a 3 point. The 5600 has a dump bed, but 3 point kits exist. About 100hp IIRC. The downside is that the FEL doesn't lift real high and the 5610s PTO is a hydraulic motor, so it makes only about 60hp at the PTO.
60Hp out of a hydraulic motor is still impressive. Many round or sq balers would still be in the 30Hp to 60Hp range, especially the New Holland types.

From experience, those older John Deere SQ balers will work with the lower Hp PTOs, but the really negative side is, they tend to shake the back end of the CUTs badly. It's the throw action of the baler arm going side-to-side. I've used a JD219 baler that shook me. The owner said that's normal for that machine. Now, the JD348 may not have that issue. It's a better machine and can pack normal size to longer size bales if needed.
 

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The numbers are from memory, but yah, those are hydraulic powerhouses. They normally run big hydraulic implements on the FEL.
oops, way off.
https://www.bobcat.com/utility-products/toolcat/models/5610/specs-options
60hp at the engine, 25hp at the PTO

still, heck of a machine that would work better than a conventional tractor for many.

I would have never even thought of this for crab steering;
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/83/c2/9f/83c29fb843d9f21d4b170d9622ac344c.jpg
 

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My closest neighbor has a 2005 toolcat. It was once a great machine. However, the subframe has rusted thru, the AC had stopped working after warranty, the front windshield leaks, the wiring has many gremlins and the parts are on the costly side.
He did say, he will never own another one. Bobcat tractors on the other hand are good and durable as he has one of those.

Looking at the Bobcat tractors, the CT5045E vs. the CT4045 are the two picks to compare. The CT5550E is identical to the CT5045E, but only 5Hp more. And possibly a hit on price.
 

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I believe the rust through is probably because they get used around the saltiest of snow.
Bobcat Tractors are Kioti tractors. I'm not going to say good or bad about them beyond I hear they are a decent deal after Kubota taught them about quality. I've never even sat in a seat, so I really can't say beyond what I've read and heard. My point is Don't think they are the same company as the skid-steers and what-not. Its just a badge.
 

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I think for 60 acres, you would need something bigger. My family owns a 60-acre tree farm. Not long ago, we upgraded our tractor to a Kubota L4600 as the previous one struggled with cutting all the brush that grew like someone was watering it daily. Our old tractor had 65 hp, and given that the terrain is uneven, it struggled to cut through thick brush on the way up. It took me a lot of time to clear the entire farm; imagine how big is an acre is and multiply that by 60.
 

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Just got out of the Dr's office from my fourth skin graft procedure. After 3 complete procedures, the.wound has has decreased in size by 40.1%. I thought that was excellent news.

I did find out today that the average treatment for the graft procedure is 10 sessions. Some have more, some less. The Dr is quite pleased with the results so far, but is sticking with the 10 week estimate.

The treatments are not too bad except for
the bacterial scrubbing of the foot and leg. I have no reason to complain as the treatments are going well. I am convinced that the tech who does the scrubbing had a previous career as a professional wrestler or a lumberjack. She has hands like a a steel vise and arms as big as telephone poles. I don't argue. Just do as I am told.

One piece of sad news. I inadvertently killed my entire worm farm. All 3 to 4 thousand worms. It was entirely my fault. The worm farm was getting a little dry so I hooked up the hose and gave it a little water.I estimated that it was less than 1/2 gal.I checked it t he beat day and noticed a strange odor. It was the smell of dead worms. To water the worms, I hooked the hose to the exterior faucet and filled my normal half wat full. Did not want to over water. In this process I forgot the house spout was on city water, not the well water we use on plants. City water contains chlorine which is highly toxic to worms. I sifted the bedding and did not find one alive worm. All that work down th we tubes. Oh well. You can't fix stupid.9
 

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Good news about the treatment. seems you are following the lumberjacks instructions!!!
Bad news about the worms. A lot of work and enjoyment came from that project. A little planning for a new worm farm once you heal up and you'll be back fishing in no time!
 
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