Tractor Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello- any TFers' recommendations on a torque wrench?I'm going to try to stick to kubotas torque specs. Brand, price, where to buy,etc?I'm leaning toward snap-on or one at NAPA but open to suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,711 Posts
The Snap-On will be the one of the best, but it will be pricey. You could get something cheaper at Sears, Home Depot, etc. That might suit your needs if all you are doing is torquing your tractor, which I doubt would be an everyday thing!

I don't know about the NAPA. I have Husky breaker type 3/8 inch drive torque wrenches and an old 1/2 inch drive beam type torque wrench. The Husky's are great for my needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
thank you Moe. I think your avatar is one of the funniest I ever saw. I grew up on Moe /Larry/Curly & Shemp ( but the bride says I never grew up)I use it as a screen shot if you don't mind.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
319 Posts
a beam type is harder to read accuretly, but conversely is the one that is most reliable over the long haul-- the better craftsman torque wrenches are pretty good-- any torque wrench costing almost 200$ better be-- my older son is an mechanical and electrical engineer, and he makes his own frequently for the lab tests for the heavy equipment company he works for -- he says they are simple and easy to make-- who knew?
 

·
EX Super Mod
Joined
·
5,317 Posts
I would go with the Snap-on as well. Mow my wife likes the 3 Stooges as much as me.:winky:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
Save your money, buy an assortment of nuts and bolts instead!

1. Tighten the nut in question till you twist the bolt in two!

2. Remember how much strength it required to do the above!

3. Put in new nut and bolt and use 75% of effort you used the first time!!

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
arley
You might want to look at MATCO every bit as good if not better than Snap-on and at least 15-20% cheaper. If you need prices let me know what you are looking for as far as drive and torque range.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Well just becasue you buy a top brand like Snap On don't take it for granted its calibrated correctly..There is a lot to know about a torque wrench bsides just watching the dial go to the torque or have it click when a preset amount is dialed in.
If its a right hand don;t ever use it for left hand, and never use it as a breaker bar. If you get an adjustable or break over type always run it down to its lowest setting when not in use, but never below that setting, and never above the highest setting. The military spends tons of money on calibrating torque wrenches, usually on average every 60 days weather its used or not, and if its ever dropped, it gets sent to calibration imediately. We often got in brandnew Snap On Torque wrenches and it was not uncommon for quite a few of them not to be calibrated within the called for specs, or some would calibrate in on the low end but be off in the high end, and some just the opposite. If a torque wrench is worth having its worth having its calibration certified and rechecked. If thats too much hassle then you may just use a bit of common sense and use your best judgement. Maybe lots may think this is overkill, but it is not........I have a set of Torque wrenches in 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4 drive in all the ranges you more than likely in most situations would ever need one for, and I had them all calibrated and still have them checked at least once a year..........The beam an dial is perhaps the most trouble free torque wrench but its not as accurate as the adjustable breakaway or snap over type.

Just my 2 cents on torque wrenches.....other than that, I would go with Arch Deans proceedure!:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,687 Posts
Here's a page from the current MATCO TOOLS catalog. What Chip said is true, keeping them calibrated is critical regardless of how much or little you use them.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
Chip just gave most people more info then they will ever need to know about torque wrenches, yes I have a couple of the little gems and the last time I needed to use them was on my aircraft engine overhaul!!

To be honest Tractors don't care much most owner serviced parts are a course thread and any thing short of being Ham fisted is generally sufficient read common sense here!!

If you still feel compelled to own one, follow Chip's advice and then decide if the setting you are about to use, is for a dry bolt or a wet one (makes a big difference)!!

An experienced nut turner will be very close to specs just by feel! (My preference) and if that big grade 8 bolt on your 3 point hollers Ouch and turns purple you over tortured the big fellow!!!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,567 Posts
Snap-On, Mac, and Matco are real nice and nice and expensive. I use a Craftman 1/2" drive ratchet head click type torque wrench that I have had for over 30 years. Keep it clean and lubricated periodically and above ALL, set the torque adjustment scale back to ZERO after EACH use. Never store it adjusted to anything but zero and no throwing it around or dropping it and it will serve and last you a life time. Calibrating it is nice but most if not nearly all users do not have access to a calibration lab the equipment to verify torque accuracy. If you treat it well, no DA Label 80 is required. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,567 Posts
Almost forgot one other thing..........................NO BREAKING TORQUE on fasteners with the torque wrench! This was one of my pet peeves on the flight line.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
978 Posts
Chief, You had better explain what "Breaking Torque" is for the folks out there. A lot of folks will never work on a flight line and will not know what you are talking about. I know and there are a couple places where breaking torque is required on some jet powered aircraft.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Chief,
I assume you are talking about using the wrench to loosen a fastaner? Nver want to do that. and a GREAT tip about dialing it back to zero.

Dean,
The torque value you refer to has a tech name. Its called "dam near shear" :D I like using the "Tighten till it breaks, then back off a 1/4 turn":D :D

arleyp,
I also have had good luck with my Sears "click" type wrench. It was not cheap, but no good one is. I like the "click" type, becouse you don't need to have a clear sight line to the dial. When you are working under something, you cant always see it. I had an OLD Snapon dile type, and I got rid of it for that reason.

Oh and I use mine ALL the time, and have had it for probley 15 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Dear Mow-

Well, I got more info on torque wrenches than I needed.thanks tfer's.
I like the 2230. It's a big toy for me.The MMM really does a fine job compared to my older wheel horse- faster, smoother, more rugged.funny thing is it's only about a foot longer than the old wheel horse ( at the dealer it appeared 2x as long) so manuvering is a snap for mowing.
The loader is the most fun. Instant gratification- you see what you did ( or messed up) right away.I've moved every rock,piece of wood and pile of dirt I can find so far. I'm always looking for something else to move.
Have't used the blower for snow but can hardly wait.
The tractor itself is a bit of a learning curve for the maintenance and hooking up the stuff but the manuals are straightforward and I have a good neighbor who has a big bota for his tree farm and we have fun playing figuring stuff out.We plan on breeding our tractors come spring.
Of course lots of help from tfer's.
nyuck,nyuck,nyuck.
arley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,711 Posts
arleyp,

This is great. Another Sub-Compact utility tractor owner on this site! It's been kind of lonely here in that regard. :) Sounds like you made a great choice on your machine. My JD 2210 isbasically the same machine, only it's painted a different color. ;)

It's amazing how tough and capable these smaller machines are. There has only been a few times I wanted something bigger. I'm able to go most places I want to with the FWD and compact size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,711 Posts
Originally posted by Keweenaw4310

...........
On the bigger stuff - like what I just worked with assembling my skid plates on my tractor, I was asked by the instructions to torque stuff down to 150 & 210 ft lbs on some of those bolts. Ok, come on, if I torque a big ass nut and bolt to 190 or 270 ft lbs, it's still tight and takes a breaker bar & a 3' piece of pipe to get off.
Tom,

There are 2 hitch pin locations on my Rotary Cutter. Naturally they were in the higher position for the bigger tractors when the RC was delivered out to my property (I wasn't there at the time). I had a 3/4 in drive socket wrench which I jumped up and down on as well as using a big cheater or breaker bar, and the pin nuts wouldn't budge. An impact wrench wouldn't work either. The manual states 485 ft lbs of torque I believe!. My retired father-inlaw broke them loose for me . I wasn't there when he loosened them, but he did mention a sledge hammer.:D
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top