Tractor Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Rock Grower
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure if this is the correct spot for this thread or not but here goes.

I have been told that I have metric sized tires on my tractor but no one can/will tell me what is the U.S. size tire for 15.5-38?

On the tire it states "on a 14 inch Rim " what does that mean? my rims are 14"inches wide?

I know nothing about tires or rims.
One of the tire has a large bulge on the inside of the rim but not the outside, does that mean anything?

The other tire has no bulges.

Both tires have dry rot and bad cracks and ware.
Does it mater that they are different brands and ware?

Is there anything I can do to prolong the tires life?
Tires are expensive and i'm not sure what to look for when looking for used tires, i should I Bite the bullet and give another digit to the bank for new ones?

When i get New or new used tires do I get ballistic put in?
How can I tell if my current tires have ballistic in them now?
Would I be able to change the tires my self?

See i told you I know NOTHING about tires or rims just questions, sorry.
rearcrackedtire.jpg
rearcrackedtire.jpg
rearsplittire.jpg
reartireboulge.jpg
reartiregouge.jpg
reartiresize.jpg
reartiresize1.jpg
rearcrackedtire.jpg
rearsplittire.jpg
reartireboulge.jpg
reartiregouge.jpg
reartiresize.jpg
reartiresize1.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,675 Posts
Bulges equate to tire carcass failure. That condition can lead to catastrophic failure and tractor roll over.

One tire is 15.5 on 38 inch rim, and the R in the size of the other indicates it is a radial tire. When replacing use the same size and type on both sides. Radial tires typically run lower tire pressure, set fractionally lower, and have more traction than non-radial tires. You want both tires to have the same drive diameter.

Any agricultural tire shop will be able to get you the tires, they are conventional sized tires. Any tire shop equipped to change truck and ag tractor tires can change them for you, not something I recommend you do yourself as the beads will be nearly welded to the rims after this long. But with the proper tools you could do them yourself. The 14 inch rim notice on the tire is the recommended rim width, and highly likely what you have. There should be a stamp in the metal rim that lists the rim width.

Most ag tire dealers will have a supply of used tires, as will tractor salvage yards. Given the cost of freight, I would look locally first.

Watch this you tube video, it will illustrate what a fluid filled tire valve stem looks like:
If fluid filled, the old fluid will need to be pumped out. Any ag tire dealer will do this when changing the tire.

I would not install ballast unless you are operating a front end loader or operating ground engagement equipment that requires more weight on the tractor.

If you have an air compressor and tire inflating fitting, you can roll the tire until the stem is at the bottom and press the valve core. If fluid squirts out you have ballast. But, immediately afterward roll the stem back to the top and inflate with enough air to clear any fluid out of the valve. The old standby fluid, calcium chloride, is extremely corrosive and needs to be cleared fron the tire valve to prevent leaks.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
Ditto! What RC Wells said. When buying tires you may want to consider what you plan on using the tractor for. You have three styles of tires: Turf, Ag, and Industrial. I see you have chains, so if your just plowing snow and mowing grass, you can get turf tires. They won’t chew up the ground as much. Industrial tires will bite into the ground a little better but still run smooth on asphalt without tearing it up. AG tires have a very aggressive tread, are great for working in a muddy field, but will tear up your lawn and are not suitable for any significant amount of driving on asphalt or concrete.


Sent from my iPhone using Tractor Forum
 

·
Rock Grower
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Bulges equate to tire carcass failure. That condition can lead to catastrophic failure and tractor roll over.

One tire is 15.5 on 38 inch rim, and the R in the size of the other indicates it is a radial tire. When replacing use the same size and type on both sides. Radial tires typically run lower tire pressure, set fractionally lower, and have more traction than non-radial tires. You want both tires to have the same drive diameter.

Any agricultural tire shop will be able to get you the tires, they are conventional sized tires. Any tire shop equipped to change truck and ag tractor tires can change them for you, not something I recommend you do yourself as the beads will be nearly welded to the rims after this long. But with the proper tools you could do them yourself. The 14 inch rim notice on the tire is the recommended rim width, and highly likely what you have. There should be a stamp in the metal rim that lists the rim width.

Most ag tire dealers will have a supply of used tires, as will tractor salvage yards. Given the cost of freight, I would look locally first.

Watch this you tube video, it will illustrate what a fluid filled tire valve stem looks like:
If fluid filled, the old fluid will need to be pumped out. Any ag tire dealer will do this when changing the tire.

I would not install ballast unless you are operating a front end loader or operating ground engagement equipment that requires more weight on the tractor.

If you have an air compressor and tire inflating fitting, you can roll the tire until the stem is at the bottom and press the valve core. If fluid squirts out you have ballast. But, immediately afterward roll the stem back to the top and inflate with enough air to clear any fluid out of the valve. The old standby fluid, calcium chloride, is extremely corrosive and needs to be cleared fron the tire valve to prevent leaks.
Both tires are the same size. we dont' have a tractor Salvage anywheres close. there may be one in Indiana.

Ag supply houses sell the tires they remove from customers rims, they get it coming and going. Used tires are at least 150.00 for a so so tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Both tires are the same size. we dont' have a tractor Salvage anywheres close. there may be one in Indiana.

Ag supply houses sell the tires they remove from customers rims, they get it coming and going. Used tires are at least 150.00 for a so so tire.
There are tractor salvage yards in northern Indiana. Large one is New Paris Tractor Parts.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Metric sized tires carry a P prefix according to the local tire shop, but can be cross referenced to US nomenclature with a conversion chart the tire dealers keep. W h en in doubt, ask a guy in the tire business. They are the pros in their line of work. Most are very friendly and will answer your questions. Competition is fierce with the on line who l esalers, and the locals really want your business.
 

·
Rock Grower
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
i found some 18.9x30 tires and rims for 600 each, went to get them 2 days later and the guy that recommended this dealer to me bought them out from under me three days after he told me about the place. but to make up for it he is selling me his old ones. 15.5x38 tires(bad shape)(no holes) and like new spin out rims with center weights for 5 for the pair. The rims alone are worth over $1000.00.
He Did'nt know if I were going to get them or not. I hold NO ill will against him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
With friends like that, who needs enemys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
oldmanfarmer. Use caution with those tires.I did not. I put on a complete new set of 4 in 1974 when I acquired the NAA. They still had good tread, no road travel at all, but had severe dry rot like yours from sitting outside so many years. Took the old girl out mowing to keep everything lubed, etc.and the left rear blew about 2 hours into the mowing job. Tire completely separated at sidewall where there was a slight bulge, not near as bad as your pics. lost tube and ballast before I got it home. Rim looks compromised also. Tires have looked this way for years, so I thought they were okay for a little work. WRONG. Just thankful I was on flat ground at the time and only 200 yds of flat to get it home. It could have been much worse if I was on hilly ground. If you find a good set of 12.4x28s, really dirt cheap, give a hollar. Am financily challenged currently after the same thing happened to the 4000. I really should have known better after losing the right rear on the 4000 in the same field.
 

·
Rock Grower
Joined
·
341 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Sounds like you need to stay out of that field. haha.
Yes Ed I will.
Got the new wheels last week. Had a heck of a time getting them off the trailer. Had to strap one of them to the tractor and move the truck forward.
Once I get the tractor going i'm gonna try and use the boom pole to stand up a new wheel and slowly roll it to the side of the tractor that is flat then jack the tractor, stand it, remove old tire. install new one.
sound easy, right?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
Sounds like you need to stay out of that field. haha.
Yes Ed I will.
Got the new wheels last week. Had a heck of a time getting them off the trailer. Had to strap one of them to the tractor and move the truck forward.
Once I get the tractor going i'm gonna try and use the boom pole to stand up a new wheel and slowly roll it to the side of the tractor that is flat then jack the tractor, stand it, remove old tire. install new one.
sound easy, right?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,050 Posts
That was a very good reason for having 2 tractors. I used the boom pole on the NAA to change the right rear on the 4000. Now I am using the boom pole on the 4000 to change the left rear on the NAA. By the way, once I got the wheel off the NAA, I found that I did not actually blow the tire. Instead, I had a major rim failure. The rim is actually what blew apart and not the tire. I had repaired this rim 37 years ago by using rolled 10 ga metal the inside width of the rim and welding it in, then split down the middle, hammered a bead groove in and rewelding the split. Should have known it would not last forever. The rim looked good still on the outside, but horrific on the inside. I will take some pics tomorrow and post.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pogobill
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top