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Discussion Starter #1
I could swear but job is done.
71962
71963
71964

Did not use or have pickle fork for removal. Yesterday was a mess. Soaked and beat all drag links with no success.
This morning got idea to beat hard and use nuts with steel pipewrench to push links out. Bitch (oops, no swearing) and it worked.

Installed new Tafe stuff and set wheels straight on paved road outside hunting camp. Full speed and no wiggle wobble. Yeah!

I have two more sets I can sell if you have a Tafe. Hard to find here in US.
 

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So you're saying spending 12 hours on a job because you didn't want to spend $12 on a ball joint fork at NAPA might not have been that much fun? Funny thing about speciality tools.... You don't really need them, until you really need them馃榾

NAPA BALL JOINT TOOL $12
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well 鈥淗ello鈥 to you. Often there is not much response here so all is welcome.

Until two nights ago I did not know what a 鈥減ickle fork鈥 was. Back in my younger days, I鈥檓 a 1944 model, I was a school teacher and gunsmith plus charter captain. Owned tractors but did little major mechanical work.

When I could not get the drag links out at all, I called a mobile tractor mechanic near my hunting place in rural Georgia. He was out of town but told me to go to NAPA and get that thing. It was late and there is a NAPA dealer near Americus so I figured I would make the trip the next day. When I checked the internet it showed one costing $49 at NAPA and I was then also going to see if they had one in stock.

On the internet a video showed using a Jack to push up on the end while beating the side with a large hammer. None of my prying and hitting worked but the next morning I varied the video idea. There was very little room below or next to the links and got an idea. Screwed the nuts on the links down, wedged the side of a pipe wrench and later a pry bar under the nut. Then screwed the nut down super tight putting lots of pressure on the link. Hammered on the side of the housing and up they popped. All four were rusted hard.

I was so proud of myself and thought I would share the idea.

Had I known pickle forks were that cheap and the store had one to sell, I still would have tried my idea first.

Doubt I will have to do any more of that in my remaining lifetime. If I do, will try to remember your kind words and get a pickle to get out of the 鈥減ickle鈥.
 

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Just poking a little fun at you Bud... Been a mechanic for 56 years. I probably traded living in a nice lakefront home in retirement for what I have invested in tools over the years. I've got tools, specialty tools, and tools that I've made that I don't even remember what they are for. I started out working in my Uncle's garage when I was 12 and I turn 69 in October. He was the one that told me "You don't really need tools, until you really need tools". I've got dwell meters and carb tools to adjust Rochester 4-barrrels and the old Carter "Shoe Box" carbs out of the 60's. I've told both my Sons.... "When I crook, you're not getting a lot of $$$, but you're both gonna have more tools than anybody for a 200 mile radius". I've never been involved with drugs, or alcohol, but I understand addictions. When it comes to tools... I'm worse than any crackhead:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Got it and learned. Maybe others will also.

Own multiple motorcycles back into the 1920鈥檚. All have carbs and all have troubles. In this world you are never too old to learn until you are really too old.
 

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Actually went to motorcycle mechanic school when I got out of the Army in 75. Went to work in a Honda shop as the low-man mechanic. When you're working on flat rate, warranty work pays the least. Honda had just introduced the GL1000 Goldwing and none of the older guys wanted to work on them, so that's all I worked on for 3 years. Shop was in Colorado Springs and Honda sent one of their factory mechanics in to experiment with carb jetting for high altitude. Worked with him for a couple of months and he taught me so much about GL1000 carbs that I became kind of the guru on 1st Gen Goldwing carbs for Colorado and Wyoming.

You need to hook up with FredM.... He's on this forum from down in Australia. He's a big time bike guy and he loves the old stuff. Post a thread with pictures of your bikes in the "Off-topic" section and I'm sure he'll get a kick out of it. I usually go over to the Barber Museum in Birmingham for the Vintage Bike Festival in October. They cancelled it last year because of Covid, but this year, I'm gonna send Fred pictures, just to taunt him馃槑
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Worked one Summer as a mechanic/helper at Eaton Motors in Oakmont, Pa. Also did the new Gold Wing. Worst was the 450 twins and the cam adjuster bolt in the new 350 four.

71989
Three of us on this ride. I am the only one still alive in that brown 500 four.

71990
Look a bit different today. This is Heinz Leutringhauser鈥檚 R6. I have a picture with him in Germany while he us looking at a picture of my bike, this one. Heinz died 15 years ago.
71991
71992
Way too much for a tractor forum post. I also have pictures of some of my old tractors.
 
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