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Well, yes I know....another project! Based upon the amount of work going on down here from the storm, it is AMAZING how much work needs to be done. Pricing for everything is going through the roof and some of the quotes I have been seeing on things like tub setting are getting out of hand in my opinion.

The bathroom areas have been gutted out, area for tub clear and clean. All drywall finished in house to 8 feet, textured and prep coat and 1st finish coat of paint applied. Tub areas left open for setting and finishing. Local plumbers want nearly $900 each to set 2 lightweight Kohler fiberglass (composite) tubs into place. Overflow and drain assemblies to be replaced (according to plumber) on each. I assume it is placing tub in place, shimming, leveling, and setting plumbing into tub. I just thought the prices were high and I have been shopping around. Any insight to this or advice?

Thanks!
Andy
 

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Back when I set tubs for a mobile home manufacturer, I charged $200 each (8 years ago). They only hard part was getting them in the space without removing walls!:flamedevi They are not hard to set (especially the fiberglass ones). Are these two piece or one piece? Set your bsae into the hole and plumb, shim. It works best if you are a LITTLE out of level towards the drain (slightly). If the tub has a big styrofoam "chunk" underneath, then place a THIN piece of plywood under neath this styrofaom. Put a small sheet of tar paper between this plywood and the faom (helps reduce "squeaking"). Shim and trim! Note - Drill a pilot hole for any screws - even self tapping ones can crack the gelcoat!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like tubs were existing at 30x60....new tubs are 32x60....measured and there is room in the framing to support the tub easily.....but the drain/overflow/fill are off-center.... Can this be modified by a good plumber or do I need to just get the same size tub? I was told that the drain opening areas are left roughed in so there can be adjustments made....Anyone have any insight on this?

Thanks!
Andy
 

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Andy

when I set the tub in my basement bathroom I had a buddy help me ease it in but other than that it was easy. Yes I left the drain roughed in and still need to finish the run for it now that its set. In my case I had to cut the cement floor and run the drain over to a lift pit which has a pump to push up the waste water to the level of the sewer line. I left the end of it sticking out of the floor in the general area of the drain on the tub and now I just need to run the trap and install the drain stopper hardware. I was going to post some pics of my basement finishing project since I'm doing most of it myself if anyone would like to see them.
 

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Yeah - Andy, Chrp is right. MOST drains are left roughed in. Even if yours is not it probably can be modified (depending on where the floor joists are!).
 

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One more question.....one contractor was talking about laying down a bed of cement or mortar for the tub to rest in....is this required and what makes this determination? Well, the plumbing and drains are in already as this was a pre-existing installation. I cut the access panels for the installation of the drain and overflow assemblies once tub is set etc.....I am tired of waiting for work to be done..
 

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Some people used to lay down mortar to help with the sqeaking and shifting of a fiberglass tub. I'd try to stay away from it. the tar paper does the same thing.
 

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Didn't you say somewhere this was an install in a ranch with a cement slab? Maybe I confused it with one of your many other projects. :dazed:

If it is on a slab the only reason I can think of to lay the mortar base is if the existing floor is out of wack and won't support the fiberglass tub in the correct places to protect it from cracking when used and still allow proper drainage. I installed mine over the existing slab and it is a one piece tub and shower unit that once we had it framed out properly and checked the plumb of the floor just slid it in. I didn't have to shim it or anything but again I had built the new bathroom with the specs for the tub in hand. There was also a slight tilt to the floor (in the right direction luckily) towards the sump pump from when the house was built.
 
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