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Discussion Starter #1
I need to remove the paint on the frame around the front door on the house. Tried sanding with electric sanders but it takes forever. Also there are ribs(?) up the side panels and the crown moulding around the peak would be impossible to sand by machine. Don't want to use paint remover as I'm sure it will get on the stoop. So, I'm thinking sandblasting? Any thoughts on this, and what type of media would be best?
 

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sixchows…

I agree with you about the sanding, it becomes a career
but IMO sandblasting wood molding is not the way to go.
Even with the finest mediums the process is too aggressive
to control on wood. Mechanical sanding exterior details is
an endless, torturous process and heat guns only seem to work
well on TV.

So that being said, I would ask that you reconsider using the paint
remover. Effectively masking the surrounding area won’t take nearly
as long as any other method you might be considering. The paint
removers are available in a wide range of strengths and toxicities
(they go hand in hand) and will do the best job, in the shortest amount
of time and do the least amount of damage to the molding.
 

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Have you tryed scrapers? There are some nice ones out there with diferent size, interchangable blades on them that work real well.

I would also vote paint stripper though. If your carfull, you can do a nice job, with almost no mess.
 

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Sounds to me that your referring to the brick moulding.....rather than invest all that time trying to remove the paint....just replace it. It's readily available at your nearest home center.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's what it looks like now. I'd rather not get into anything major as far as tearing off the wood and replacing the flashing. Just looking to clean it up and make it last a little longer. The wood is in decent shape but hasn't been painted in years. The house was built in 1951 and this is the original wood so it's got lead paint and kinda thick.
 

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Lowes carries stuff called Strip-eze. I hope I spelled it right, it will take the paint right off. It is messy and requires gloves at least to use it. It will burn your hands if you get it on it. I used it to take off a couple of layers of paint on our kitchen cabinets. I tried the sanding thing and it gummed up the paper real quick.

I think sandblasting will really screw up the nice fluted wood you have. It looks like it has been ther a while and replacing it would be a chore, and a pity to waste the nice looking wood and craftsmanship. :nerd:
 

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Sandblasting will remove the paint and all the soft wood in between the grain.:duh: Im with Stewart use the stipper.
 

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Either us a chemical stripper or a sanding sponge. Sanding sponges conform to surfaces with contours with minimal contours. If there is a lot of detail, avoid them as they do tend to round over sharp edges.

My vote would be chemical or a brass wire brush.
 

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sixchows
That's a very stately entrance...it would be worth the effort to strip and restore it...sand blasting would muddle all the detail in the wood....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I was afraid you guys would say that. :D I was looking for a fast easy way out. I guess the stripper in small areas at time to avoid a huge mess would be the way to go?
 

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Originally posted by sixchows
Here's what it looks like now. I'd rather not get into anything major as far as tearing off the wood and replacing the flashing. Just looking to clean it up and make it last a little longer. The wood is in decent shape but hasn't been painted in years. The house was built in 1951 and this is the original wood so it's got lead paint and kinda thick.
That is some nice looking wood work. I would try the chemical stripper as already stated above but I think I would try using a pressure washer with the pressure turned down. Just be carefull around the glass and any suspected loose pieces. The pressue washer should nicely clean up the chemical coating and leave fresh clean wood.

Make sure you use eye protection and a GOOD primer coat if you decide to repaint the wood. Depending on what the wood looks like underneath, I would prefer a natural stain or some type of strongly UV protective varnish/translucent coating like a urathane finish.
 

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Originally posted by simple_john
couldnt he put the stripper on and pressure wash it off??
That's what he said....Not a bad idea really...the water from the pressure washer would dilute the chemicals in the stripper, probably to an acceptable level....sounds like a plan!!
 

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If the wood has any rot or soft spots, the pressure from the PW would tear the wood to crap. I would still use sandpaper on the flats, easy coves and rounds, and use a small brass wire brush for the tight spots. You could use a sanding sponge on all of the areas, except the flutes from what I saw. Just a little bit of elbow grease and some determination is all you need. If you sand or strip with chem. be sure to use a proper respirator!!! Especially if there is lead present.
 

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Leo's post does bring up a good point. If the house is older then you might have a problem with the lead paint. I am not sure of the disposal requirements in your area. If you call the local building inspector they might be able to shed some light on it.

Sorry there is no easy way out of geting the old paint off. It will cost a little bit of money and a whole lot of sweat equity. I would be real carefull even with a pressure washer, it can mess up the wood.

If it is worth doing it is worth doing right!!! At least that is what dad used to say, or maybe it was where is that hammer...???

Good luck and like Leo said you should think about a respirator and be carefull with the paint stripper.:money: :cheers:
 

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Paint Removal

Around here we use Water based chemical paint stripper on wood like that. Sanding will destroy the details, (as will sand or glass blasting) as well as leaving the paint traces at the bottom of all the grooves that you see so many places.

I've never tried a pressure washer in combo with stripper, but I think that would be your best bet. Just make sure you are set up to capture the runoff, either with pans or a shop-vac.
 
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