Rear Weight For 3520

Discussion in 'John Deere' started by Simpleprestige, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. Simpleprestige

    Simpleprestige New Member

    380
    Apr 20, 2007
    We recently bought a JD 3520 w/ 300 loader and filled rear tires. This is plenty of rear weight as long as we are just moving compost, and sawdust. We moved some rocks the other day that were nowhere near big enough to tax the loader and tried to go down a hill. It was difficult because the hill involves going down it and transversing at the same time. On the way down the rear tire came off the ground and I thought for sure it was going to roll into the woods. Luckily I skidded down the rest of the hill just fine, this was a wake up call.

    Does anyone know of any rear weights that:

    1. Are cheap

    2. Won't interfere with the 3- point

    3. don't take away from the appearance of the machine.


    Also, I have noticed that the rear tires on this tractor are extremely skinny and they don't keep the center of gravity low on the tractor very well. I would think that they would put wider tires on it like I have seen on the Kubota's and make it alot safer.

    Thanks,

    Simple
     
  2. Live Oak

    Live Oak New Member

    Dec 21, 2003
    When it comes to counter weight, you pretty much have 3 choices. You can fill the tires but that is not enough to properly ballast most machines. Next you can add wheel weights (read NOT cheap) or you can mount an impliment on the 3 point hitch such as a beefy box blade or landscaping rake. If you want to keep the 3 point hitch open then you are pretty much relegated to wheel weights.

    One other option which may help out some and I am going under the presumption that you have R-1 ag tires mounted on your tractor. If your dealer will trade out with you, you can have a set of the large R-4 industrial tires mounted and fill them. They hold a larger volume of fluid and thus more weight but they have draw backs in mud and gooey conditions and don't get as good a traction as R-1 ag tires.

    The last outside option is to have the operator of the machine start eating real good to put on some weight. :D ;) yumyum tiphat

    I provide about 240 lbs. of ballast weight when I am in the seat. :cheers:
     

  3. Simpleprestige

    Simpleprestige New Member

    380
    Apr 20, 2007
    We have the Turf tires on all four tires because we were told they get better traction in the snow. Both the rear tires are filled. at our farm, the weight range for the operator is only between 130 lbs and 180lbs. We do have a back blade to put on the back, but I have found it is about a foot wider than the machine itself, therefore we would have to take it on and off when we put it away because it sits in the aisle of a horse barn. What kind of weights do you have on your 4410
     
  4. Live Oak

    Live Oak New Member

    Dec 21, 2003
    I have R-4 Industrial tires filled with Rim Gard. I mount a trailer towing bar on the rear hitch and I stack some steel wheel weights, chains, and a heavy steel bar on it when I do heavy work with the front end loader.


    <img src="http://www.tractorforum.com/attachment.php?s=&postid=96731">
     

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  5. Live Oak

    Live Oak New Member

    Dec 21, 2003
    On another note, I have had R-3 turf tires on previous tractors and found that they were very good for not tearing up the turf and got reasonable alround traction but were horrible in mud or other slippery conditions. Turf tires may get an good intial bite in snow, mud, or soft ground but once they slip the least little bit, they totally loose all traction as the tread fills up with snow or soil where a good R-1 ag tire will keep digging and the tread will continue to clean itself out. R-4 industrial tires are a reasonable compromise between R-3 turf tires and R-1 ag tires. They are not real good at both but do fair alround. They are not very good in mud or snow.