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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yesterday, I unfortunately started a thread that was supposed to be about "FREE" on-line classes concerning motorsport wiring. It turns out that "FREE" is the typical internet BS of $150 for a package of courses where you can learn the same thing through You Tube, or actually reading service/technical manuals. I feel bad about it and want to share something about small engine training that would actually be useful to the people on this Forum.

You Tube has changed the world when it comes to people wanting to learn mechanical skills. The downside to You Tube is ANYBODY can post a video. It's the age old problem that is the downside of OJT training as a mechanic in general, the information/skill acquired is only as good as the source. If the guy that taught you was a "1/2 A$$" mechanic, you're going to be a "1/2 A$$" and probably not even know it. My advice concerning You Tube videos is anytime you hear the term "thingamabob", or "Whatchamacallit", hit the escape button. Highly skilled mechanics know the actual name for a part, it's part of the training/skillset .....

When it comes to high level training on Small Engines, the best source is the OEM factory Schools. It's really tough to get into them, if you don't work at a Dealership. Even then, the usual week-long "Certification" schools don't typically start with the basics. They are advanced courses and you are expected to have around 2 years of daily work experience in an actual Dealership environment (having worked on your own two mowers won't even begin to cut it). So where does an average DIY go for good quality small engine training for "FREE"?

Welcome to the EETC (Equipment & Engine Training Council).....

The EETC is the ASE for small engines. They offer actual legit and recognized certification for small engine mechanics. The EETC actually goes beyond the ASE in that they have actual "FREE" on-line training videos, starting with basics and working up to some pretty advanced training. If you're a DIY guy and want a small engine learning source that is way beyond You Tube (accept for Taryl, he's pretty damn funny/good) you'll appreciate the link below. I recently started my dream of sharing all the mechanical BS stuffed in my head over the years with my 14 year old Grandson. I have him watch one of the EETC videos and then we go over it my shop on a real piece of equipment at his pace. He's a smart kid and he's really starting to pick it up. The next step to keep him on the right path is to keep convincing him how much he doesn't know.... Here's a link to the latest series of EETC on-line training videos. If you actually register with them, they'll send you e-mail notices when they are holding their "Live Stream" training classes. Don't overlook the "Load More" button at the bottom, you'll miss a lot

EETC Training Videos
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Yesterday, I unfortunately started a thread that was supposed to be about "FREE" on-line classes concerning motorsport wiring. It turns out that "FREE" is the typical internet BS of $150 for a package of courses where you can learn the same thing through You Tube, or actually reading service/technical manuals. I feel bad about it and want to share something about small engine training that would actually be useful to the people on this Forum.

You Tube has changed the world when it comes to people wanting to learn mechanical skills. The downside to You Tube is ANYBODY can post a video. It's the age old problem that is the downside of OJT training as a mechanic in general, the information/skill acquired is only as good as the source. If the guy that taught you was a "1/2 A$$" mechanic, you're going to be a "1/2 A$$" and probably not even know it. My advice concerning You Tube videos is anytime you hear the term "thingamabob", or "Whatchamacallit", hit the escape button. Highly skilled mechanics know the actual name for a part, it's part of the training/skillset .....

When it comes to high level training on Small Engines, the best source is the OEM factory Schools. It's really tough to get into them, if you don't work at a Dealership. Even then, the usual week-long "Certification" schools don't typically start with the basics. They are advanced courses and you are expected to have around 2 years of daily work experience in an actual Dealership environment (having worked on your own two mowers won't even begin to cut it). So where does an average DIY go for good quality small engine training for "FREE"?

Welcome to the EETC (Equipment & Engine Training Council).....

The EETC is the ASE for small engines. They offer actual legit and recognized certification for small engine mechanics. The EETC actually goes beyond the ASE in that they have actual "FREE" on-line training videos, starting with basics and working up to some pretty advanced training. If you're a DIY guy and want a small engine learning source that is way beyond You Tube (accept for Taryl, he's pretty damn funny/good) you'll appreciate the link below. I recently started my dream of sharing all the mechanical BS stuffed in my head over the years with my 14 year old Grandson. I have him watch one of the EETC videos and then we go over it my shop on a real piece of equipment at his pace. He's a smart kid and he's really starting to pick it up. The next step to keep him on the right path is to keep convincing him how much he doesn't know.... Here's a link to the latest series of EETC on-line training videos. If you actually register with them, they'll send you e-mail notices when they are holding their "Live Stream" training classes. Don't overlook the "Load More" button at the bottom, you'll miss a lot

EETC Training Videos
Pogobill --- You know.... I just realized it would save a lot of time/typing answering most mower engine problem post by just sending the link to the video that covers the general root of the problem. Sorta the "Teach a man to fish" philosophy.... Any way to hook these up as a "Sticky Note Library" without crossing into copyright infringement?

Take a look at the 4-stroke fuel system video starting at about 10:00..... He's using a clear plastic carb, hooked to a shop vac, to demonstrate how the carb Idle/High Speed circuits work. Now that's some well thought out lesson planning. These videos are better than anything you can find on You Tube, accept Taryl. He's just to damn funny to miss:cool:
 

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Pogobill --- You know.... I just realized it would save a lot of time/typing answering most mower engine problem post by just sending the link to the video that covers the general root of the problem. Sorta the "Teach a man to fish" philosophy.... Any way to hook these up as a "Sticky Note Library" without crossing into copyright infringement?

Take a look at the 4-stroke fuel system video starting at about 10:00..... He's using a clear plastic carb, hooked to a shop vac, to demonstrate how the carb Idle/High Speed circuits work. Now that's some well thought out lesson planning. These videos are better than anything you can find on You Tube, accept Taryl. He's just to damn funny to miss:cool:
And all I did was check out the the 3-inch Riding Mower Service Repair Manual from the local library. It covers 27 brands, dozes of makes and models, gas and diesel too. It's the 3rd edition.

I'll peek at the vids if they touch on the diesels. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And all I did was check out the the 3-inch Riding Mower Service Repair Manual from the local library. It covers 27 brands, dozes of makes and models, gas and diesel too. It's the 3rd edition.

I'll peek at the vids if they touch on the diesels. :)
You're doing yourself a real disservice if you don't take a look at least some of these videos. I've seen lots of your post.... You don't need the "principals" stuff, but there is some really good stuff in the electrical and trouble-shooting sections.... Where you'll go "That's good to know"..... For example, it's one of the few sources that I've come across that clearly explains the difference between the #87 & the #87A pins on a 5-pin relay(I had to learn that the old fashion way). There's a part in the Fuel System video where he's using a see-through plastic carburetor, attached to a shop vac, to show the high speed and idle speed fuel circuits that shows exactly why you can't really trust that you totally "cleaned" a Walbro carb without pulling that welch plug on the side. They are worth your time to watch, unless of course you're one of those guys that think they know it all. Obviously not the case, or you wouldn't be checking out that 3" Service Manual, you'd be writing one;)
 

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You're doing yourself a real disservice if you don't take a look at least some of these videos. I've seen lots of your post.... You don't need the "principals" stuff, but there is some really good stuff in the electrical and trouble-shooting sections.... Where you'll go "That's good to know"..... For example, it's one of the few sources that I've come across that clearly explains the difference between the #87 & the #87A pins on a 5-pin relay(I had to learn that the old fashion way). There's a part in the Fuel System video where he's using a see-through plastic carburetor, attached to a shop vac, to show the high speed and idle speed fuel circuits that shows exactly why you can't really trust that you totally "cleaned" a Walbro carb without pulling that welch plug on the side. They are worth your time to watch, unless of course you're one of those guys that think they know it all. Obviously not the case, or you wouldn't be checking out that 3" Service Manual, you'd be writing one;)
I'm only interested in DIESEL. ;) That's why I checked out the service manuals. A Walbro carb doesn't interest me one bit. haha

As for see-thru carbs, I've 3D printed a few. Not for mowers, but for gas powered drones. There isn't too many 3D printed materials to choose from for fuel.

Relays for 87 & 87a are typical too in the automotive AC systems and the engine cooling fans.

From what I understand, we'll have electric and DIESEL powered motors in the soon to be future.
 
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