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Hi
My neighbor does some tree work part time. He has been doing some sharpening of carbide cutters for stump grinders. He has been using a green wheel on his bench grinder but it wears a grove in the wheel and creates a lot of dust. Is there any other kind of wheel that would hold up better that he could sharpen carbide with that could be done dry?
Thanks in advance Rodster:question:
 

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As far as i know the green wheel is the only thing for sharping carbide. Thats all we have ever used at work. But if anyone should know it will be leolav being thats his business.
 

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Originally posted by MowHoward2210
Hopefully leolav will be able to help you. Isn't he an abrasive company rep?
Yes he is.
 

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About the only thing that comes to my mind to sharpen carbide is some type of diamond grit impregnated wheel. Carbide is really hard stuff. That would definitely be Leolavs bailywick.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks
I knew we had an abrasive man but forgot who it was. I hope he can answer. I don't think my neighbor has any other choice
unless he really spends some money but it does not hurt to ask.
Rodster
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I remember at work one time I tried to rough up a 5/16 carbide
ball with my high speed air grinder. It did nothing to it. I ended up using a green wheel. That is some hard stuff.
rodster
 

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Originally posted by Rodster
I remember at work one time I tried to rough up a 5/16 carbide
ball with my high speed air grinder. It did nothing to it. I ended up using a green wheel. That is some hard stuff.
rodster
It has to be it made to cut metal fast and last.
 

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I gave up on green wheels when I discovered diamond wheels. Thats the only way to go. No more dust and grit all over the place and they hold their shape, and will outlast many a green stone. Its weird, because you use a hard stone to grind soft materials(steels etc) and a soft stone to grind hard materials (carbide etc)

If I was spending any amount of time sharpening carbide cutters for a stump grinder or any carbide cutting tool I would spend the money on a decent grinding wheel. Most however do not like to be run at high speeds at least not without a coolant being applied.

Glenco makes a diamond wheel for use n the typical 6 and 8 inch bench grinders in a 100, 150 and 200 grit, which would probably be perfect for your friends use. They cost in the area of a hundred or so bucks but will easily outlast a dozen or more premium quality green wheels, and not wear a groove in them and create all that dust and grit.

Diamond wheels are available in all kinds of shapes and forms. There is the basic cheaper but good electroplated diamond wheels which can also be used ot grind steel, where you would normally use a CBN wheel (Cubic Boron Nitrade). You can grind steels on a diamond but it has a tendency to clog up the pores between the diamond grit, so you always need tolube the wheels in this case. There are embedded type wheels where you can get different concentrations of diamonds. The higher the concentration the more $$ I have one wheel that is 100% concentration and has a abrasive diamond grit in the 1000 grit size, and it will pt a mirrowlike finish on a piece of carbide you can see your self in just like chrome. A 100 grit wheel would be fine for the use you mention as its relatively coarse and will cut fast, but it still will not leave a finish as rough as a green wheel of equivalent grit will. Tell your friend to buy a Glenco brand bench grinder wheel of 100 grit and then he will not be spending as long of a time at the grinder and make less mess as well. Green wheels just plain suck after using a diamond wheel. Green wheels have their place though, but thankfully not in my shop anymore! Last thing I need is abrasive grit getting on my machined ways of the mill and lathe etc, and everything else in the shop.
 

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I figured Leolav would have been all over this post by now. Must be tied up with work or something. I am sure he will get to it shortly.
 

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Been kinda crazy. Green silicon carbide bench grinding wheels are what is needed to grind carbide teeth. The grain itself is what does the work. Silicon carbide is extremely friable and sharp which means it breaks down very easily and stays sharp . When grinding touch metals, like titanium, stainless steel, hastalloy, waspalloy and carbides, silicon carbide will be your best choice for FINISHING.

For aggressive stock removal, most any grain, like aluminum oxide, zirconium, and ceramics can do the job, but only AO and Silicon carbide is available in a bench wheel.

Green Silicon carbide is the best wheel for your application. They can be bought relativley cheaply. Much cheaper than good quality diamond wheels (generally around $300-400 bucks each)

I would also go with a 120 grit wheel as this will give you a better surface finish and still grind at a fairly good speed. Always remember that slower speeds will generally remove more material than a higher speed.

Also keep the material as cool as possible by adding coolant or dipping them after a few seconds of grinding.

Another option that alot of people are using more and more is Silicon Carbide fiber discs. They go from 16 grit all the way up to 400 grit. They tend not to last very long, but the carbide can be sharpened anywhere, even while still on the machine!! Great for when you just have a few nicks and want to just " touch up" the teeth a little bit. These were normally used in the granite and marble industries, but the grain will cut carbide pretty well.

Hope this helps.

Leo
 

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PS the reason why diamond clogs up is because it is extremely tough and does not break down. Friability (the softness of the grain) as well as hardness (the bond of the wheels) dictates what the wheel will do when they are in different materials.
 

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Originally posted by leolav
PS the reason why diamond clogs up is because it is extremely tough and does not break down. Friability (the softness of the grain) as well as hardness (the bond of the wheels) dictates what the wheel will do when they are in different materials.
Thats why the grinding wheels that Glenco makes for bench grinders in diamond is electro plated as its only one layer of diamonds attached to metallic wheel, so it is not as prone to clogging up and overheating. Resin bonded wheels always need a coolant.

I still prefer a diamond wheel when it comes to carbide. I used to spend hours sharpening carbide cutters on a green wheel now its down to minutes on a diamond wheel, running at 250 rpm instead of the usual 1800 or 3450 or more rpm as typical on a bench grinder. Not anywhere near as much heat buildup, andonly a squirt of light oil or water soluable coolant froom time to time is needed to keep wheel clean and clear from clogging up.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi
Can anybody give me a link or a phone number for Glenco diamond wheels? I can't find where to order them or get prices.
Rodster
 

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Originally posted by Rodster
Hi
Can anybody give me a link or a phone number for Glenco diamond wheels? I can't find where to order them or get prices.
Rodster
Ah, er, I appologize for the miss spelling of the name. Its Glendo.
Anyway here is the main page of their website:
http://www.glendo.com/
Here is the page with diamond wheels (electroplated type) that are useable on the typical bench grinder turning up to 3600 rpms)
http://www.accu-finish.com/bgdiamondwheel.html

Phone 1-800-835-3519

Located in Emporia, Kansas

Grinding associated stuff is under the accu finish sections. Normally the coarser the grit the more money it costs. The Glendo wheels for a Bench Grinder are some super duper wheels when it comes to grinding all kinds of hard substances like carbides and cermets.

Once again sorry for the miss spelling and my fat fingers.
 

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Those Glendo wheels are awfully pricy. Also ,with a 100 grit diamond size, it is going to take forever to take out any substantial nicks in the carbide. 100 grit is the coarsest they come in. With the Green Sil. Carb. wheels, you can at least drop to a 60 grit, and then finish it up with the diamond 120 to 150.

There is always a few steps in sharpening. Grinding, then finishing, lapping (if needed). Depending on what your sharpening, you can get away with all or only the grinding steps. I would recommend using the GSC instead of the diamonds.
 
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