Tractor Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have a small farm that fattens at total of 4400 pigs a year (B&B) which eat approximately 1000t of food - we grow around 1000t of feed wheat. It seems wrong to load a bunch of lorries to go off to the mill only for another load of lorries to bring it back again in pellet form. Does anyone process their own feed on a B&B system? Is it a whole lot of hassle not worth getting involved with??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,699 Posts
Howdy sandcreekfarm, welcome to the forum, and Merry Christmas to you and your family.

You are looking at a major investment plus a lot of extra work, but in today's environment you have to grind your own feed if you are to survive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I raise feeder cattle and weenling hogs. I grow small plot(corn,soybean, wheat)and grind/mix my own feeds. I feel I have better control over protein percentages, quality, and add mixture as desired. Crop farming is a long term investment and susceptible to weather and other damage/loss. Sometimes it’s more cost efficient to purchase bulk feed on shares or coop with local farmers. Check local sales and dealers to get an idea of what a good mixer/grinder in your area costs, then figure plant and harvest cost along with storage. You may find the convenience of processed feed.outweighs any cost advantages of mixing your own. If the added work and cost doesn’t move the bottom line an appreciable amount....it just adds more work with little return. B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
We have a small farm that fattens at total of 4400 pigs a year (B&B) which eat approximately 1000t of food - we grow around 1000t of feed wheat. It seems wrong to load a bunch of lorries to go off to the mill only for another load of lorries to bring it back again in pellet form. Does anyone process their own feed on a B&B system? Is it a whole lot of hassle not worth getting involved with??
small farm = 4,400 pigs. :eek:

our small farm = 4 pigs. Your about 1,100X bigger. :p

Our farm does MOSA organic feed and USDA inspected processing. People pay top dollar for organic and uncured. :cool: :cool: :cool:

My neighbor is looking at 400 Berkshire feeder hogs to do all organic and uncured as the market pays a premium in our mid-west markets. He has the acres to do this.
He made mention; unlike commodity pork, Berkshire pork is visibly different. It has a darker richer color with an abundance of intramuscular marbling. Its flavor is distinctive with an unparalleled juiciness and tenderness for pork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
You may find the convenience of processed feed.outweighs any cost advantages of mixing your own. If the added work and cost doesn’t move the bottom line an appreciable amount....it just adds more work with little return. B.
We found a blend of hog feed and chicken layer feed, 70/30 respectively gave the best results for the weight gain on the pigs. This allowed us to compensate monthly when shortages happened due to C19 dilemmas. Buy in dry 50-lbs sacks, use warm water, mix the ratio for a good consistency in food grade 5-gallon buckets. Takes 2 hours to fully setup.

With many hogs, I would suppose buying a Harbor-Freight cement mixer. Other hog farms in our area do just that for feed mixing and adding the warm filtered water.
https://www.harborfreight.com/power...s/3-1-2-half-cubic-ft-cement-mixer-67536.html
 
  • Like
Reactions: sandcreekfarm

·
Registered
Joined
·
896 Posts
I'm a bit surprised to hear so much goes into hog feed. I didn't think they'd be that picky to get decent growth out of. I would have thought it would be fairly simple to go to a feed crop that required less processing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Feed quality is important. You need to build muscle w/o adding fat. The market has changed over the years...finished hogs have to finish with less trimmed fat. Time is money they need to reach market weight as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible. B.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Feed quality is important. You need to build muscle w/o adding fat. The market has changed over the years...finished hogs have to finish with less trimmed fat. Time is money they need to reach market weight as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible. B.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
And it also depends on the breed too. A good breed is the Berkshire. They will both rut the soil somewhat and pasture graze. The Red Wattles are mostly pasture grazing hogs and would require much more acreage. We tried them the first year. Meat was like a good steak. Then we tired the Hereford. Somewhat disappointing as the weight gain took much longer and too much rutting the soil over making it into a desert. Had to disc-harrow too often to repair the damage.

With all that said above, breeds also do better in their natural habitat regions. Red Wattles do well from WI to the very south. Hereford's do not like the cold and will drop weight quickly and then take too long to regain it back.

IF you keep things organic, neighbors don't even know you have them. Their smells are greatly reduced. This includes organic soy. Organic soy in their diet protects hogs from viral pathogens. Likewise fermented soy. Commercial soy has less benefits due to the chemicals sprayed on them. Hogs will roam for miles looking for soy more so than corn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
896 Posts
Is there such thing as organic soy any more? Hasn't Monsanto eliminated organic soy in the courts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
Is there such thing as organic soy any more? Hasn't Monsanto eliminated organic soy in the courts?
Much of the organic soy is actually imported to the USA or raised on farms in KY by the Mennonites. They are part of the MOSA certified growers.

https://mosaorganic.org
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,171 Posts
It was a good day, because I learned something. Thanks guys!
 
  • Like
Reactions: bmaverick

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
I was a good day, because I learned something. Thanks guys!
Joe, with your location in the Poconos, turkeys should be a big thing. I know the ones in our area all flock towards anything that's an evergreen.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bontai Joe

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,171 Posts
I'm surrounded by crop farmers, wheat, soy beans and corn. There are a couple of small (10 acres or less) vegetable farms, several vineyards, several orchards, and several Christmas tree farms in the township. I haven't seen any poultry farms withing 10 miles of home, but we do have a pig farm. Thinking about it, I haven't seen any dairy farms nearby either. Now we do have wild turkeys, I've seen them walk thru my front yard often. I have a little patch of "woods" about 25 feet by 50 feet that I have spooked out all kinds of wild critters over the years, such as turkeys, deer, rabbits, squirrels, snakes and turtles. The lot across the road is an empty 1 1/2 acre wooded lot and the critters walk between my yard and that lot.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bmaverick

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
I have a little patch of "woods" about 25 feet by 50 feet that I have spooked out all kinds of wild critters over the years, such as turkeys, deer, rabbits, squirrels, snakes and turtles. The lot across the road is an empty 1 1/2 acre wooded lot and the critters walk between my yard and that lot.
That is super! It would be so nice to shoot all of them ... with a camera. :)

I've put up a few pixs here in the photo topic forum. I really like seeing the wildlife out and about. Our Turkeys have hung around late this year. We've put out treats for them once the snow packed in several inches. :cool:
 
  • Like
Reactions: bontai Joe
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top