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How do you position your loader when not in use?

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If I HAD a loader,...I'd park it on a certain neighbor's car!:lmao::lmao::lmao:
 
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Im fortunate enough to be able to store mine inside, boom down and bucket curled up. Even though the rams are chrome I try to give them all the protection possible. Just a thought for the folks that keep them outside. If I stored my loader outside, I would rather have water in the bucket than my rams exposed. If you choose to not want your bucket filling up with water, just put a coat of grease on the rams...And yes, wipe it off when you go to use the loader.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
If you want, you can leave the bucket in the curled position by drilling a hole on each side of the lowest part of the sides, 3/4 inch works, now the rams are protected and the water drains out. Just keep the holes clear. PJ
That's actually a great idea. I park mine indoors when not in use, but the numerous times I've parked the tractor in my garage with snow packed in the bucket, then it melts. this would allow the snow juice to drain.
 

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If someone is looking for a new tractor with a front end loader, I would recommend getting one with a skid steer type quick disconnect bucket attachment. Not only does it make removing the bucket easy, other available attachments can be quickly connected if needed. I had a set of forks made for mine, which can be changed easily in a couple minutes. Post hole augers, grab buckets plus other attachments are available also. PJ
 

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I take mine off it's a 3 point and sit it nose down up against my old hitching post
 
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Just curious how you leave your loader positioned when not in use, and whether inside or outside? If covered, answer as "inside". This should be interesting!
Usually I have my tractors inside the shop with the boom down and the bucket curled up. However since my Bolens came back not running well, excessive smoke and a leaky muffler (didn't leak before it went into the repair shop, but the engine didn't knock before either) I am parking it in the car port on the side of the shop, boom down, Bucket in dump position (my extra e-brake).
 

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Usually I have my tractors inside the shop with the boom down and the bucket curled up. However since my Bolens came back not running well, excessive smoke and a leaky muffler (didn't leak before it went into the repair shop, but the engine didn't knock before either) I am parking it in the car port on the side of the shop, boom down, Bucket in dump position (my extra e-brake).
P.S. if you spray your hydraulic cylinders with WD 40 it will keep the rain and condensation off. When I loaned my River Boat to my son for a trip to the San Juan Island he did not rinse it down and lube the steering ram. I learned this trick the hard way! Also don't loan your boat or your tractor to your son if he is under 50!
 

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Per just about all hydraulic manuals and service providers, best practices are to lower attachment, and release all stored hydraulic pressure from the system, after shutting off the engine. On newer electrical over hydraulic systems, you have to turn the ignition on, with engine not running, then function all controls and valves to release pressure, then turn off ignition.
Seals are damaged more frequently than cylinder rods, unless you're storing them outside in a corrosion rich environment, like coastal environment with heavy salt content.
Normal weather rarely damages the finish on cylinder rods.
 

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Per just about all hydraulic manuals and service providers, best practices are to lower attachment, and release all stored hydraulic pressure from the system, after shutting off the engine. On newer electrical over hydraulic systems, you have to turn the ignition on, with engine not running, then function all controls and valves to release pressure, then turn off ignition.
Seals are damaged more frequently than cylinder rods, unless you're storing them outside in a corrosion rich environment, like coastal environment with heavy salt content.
Normal weather rarely damages the finish on cylinder rods.
Most modern hydraulic valves are pilot operated. You need hydraulic flow to to sift the spool at all. Basically pilot operated valves have a very small pilot flow at a tightly regulated pressure. This pilot system shifts the main spools. The electronics only adjust the flow of the pilot system, and do not directly act on the spool.
 

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That "polishing and machining" is what helps keep the rams cleaner. You get more dirt/grit/grime on the rods just working in the dirt. The only place I've seen a rod rust is right where it contacts the seal. It's pretty common practice to see construction companies leave their buckets tipped down and the arms up a ways. If a ram gets "frozen" for one reason or another - you can push it IN, but you can't push it OUT. Maybe if you left it out in the weather, exposed for 2-3 years without moving the thing it would be a problem, but not the average joe tractor that gets used.

I have several cylinders that I bought at an auction. They came from a farm not far from here, and had been laying - extended - in the mud, dirt, and cow s*** of the guys barn since he died 5-6 years ago. I hosed one off, installed new hoses and mounted it on my plow in December. It works like a new one, and you can't tell it had been laying around in the muck for years.

I am on the lookout right now for a bucket for my loader. It looks like someone shot it with a 12ga. The thing rusted through because the prior owner had the tractor parked outside when he wasn't using it. He always parked it with the arms down, and the bucket up. Any water would stay in the thing, and the rust ate through the bucket.
 
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