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How do you position your loader when not in use?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious how you leave your loader positioned when not in use, and whether inside or outside? If covered, answer as "inside". This should be interesting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's it! That's what I was wondering. I see people leaving their loaders up and the buckets tipped down outside, exposing the rams. Always bothered me! Well, I know the way the poll is going to go now! Thanks Larry!
 
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I leave my 790 inside with the bucket off & boom down to take pressure of hyd. system! Lack of space is the reason the bucket (quick-tach) is left outside. ~~ grnspot110
 
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It depends....
I don't have inside storage, so I park the tractor outside. In the winter, I either have to leave the arms down, and curl the bucket into dump position, or set blocks under the bucket so it doesn't freeze to the ground. Also, during "rain" season, the bucket needs to be in the dump position so it doesn't fill with water. . One way or another, those rams are gonna be exposed. I've found out over the years, though, that the rams can take a LOT of weather related abuse, where as the bucket can't.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't know Fordfarm. I think the buckets can take more weather than the rams myself. The bucket is just a thick steel box, whereas the rams are precision machined and polished, with lots of seals and wipers. I'd sure think that leaving the rams contacted would prevent them shafts from oxidation which would help to wipe out your seals. By leaving the rods in, you prevent the oxygen and elements from getting to those rods and contaminating your hydraulic oil, as the rods are emmersed in the oil while sitting. I don't know, but it makes me cringe thinking about it. Anyone else have thoughts on this?
 

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That "polishing and machining" is what helps keep the rams cleaner. You get more dirt/grit/grime on the rods just working in the dirt. The only place I've seen a rod rust is right where it contacts the seal. It's pretty common practice to see construction companies leave their buckets tipped down and the arms up a ways. If a ram gets "frozen" for one reason or another - you can push it IN, but you can't push it OUT. Maybe if you left it out in the weather, exposed for 2-3 years without moving the thing it would be a problem, but not the average joe tractor that gets used.

I have several cylinders that I bought at an auction. They came from a farm not far from here, and had been laying - extended - in the mud, dirt, and cow s*** of the guys barn since he died 5-6 years ago. I hosed one off, installed new hoses and mounted it on my plow in December. It works like a new one, and you can't tell it had been laying around in the muck for years.

I am on the lookout right now for a bucket for my loader. It looks like someone shot it with a 12ga. The thing rusted through because the prior owner had the tractor parked outside when he wasn't using it. He always parked it with the arms down, and the bucket up. Any water would stay in the thing, and the rust ate through the bucket.
 

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Since tadpole bucket w/slight forward tip float setting for arms into ground..serve as drainage also second break I wheel block tires..most of newer HST models suggest one engage clutch pedal also tractor transmission in neutral if tractor not use for period of time...my reason for bucket setting.
 

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I park inside with boom down and bucket level on floor. Once I shut off the tractor I do relieve some pressure on the bucket. If there is an attachment on the 3ph I lower that and relieve the tension. If the backhoe is on I lower that and relieve the pressure. I voted Other.



John Deere 770 4x4
 

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RICK THE PLUMBER
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Oh, I just have a carry all and a scraper that mounts on the three point on the ole Ford 51 8N. I always store implements ,inside or out where they won't hold water, just like my threads.:lmao:
 

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RICK THE PLUMBER
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I missed something here, I went down to the shop and looked at my 8N, and I can't find any hydrolic cylenders on the out side of my tractor, do you think I have a factory recall coming in the near future?
 

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Chief Ranch Wrench
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Bucket Position

I fibbed on the poll. Usually have boom down, bucket curled and wish it was in dump position when it is full of water. We DO actually get rain in Calif. After seeing post referring to rams and weather it is ok to dump bucket(s) of water. Thanks for tip. Guess if ever a new tractor arrives it will have a manual and i'll read it. :D
 

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After seeing several big "flakes" of green-painted steel peel off the inside of my loader bucket, I NEVER leave it parked outside without curling the bucket down. Once on the ground, you can relieve the pressure in the lines by moving the joystick in all four directions repeatedly until it stops moving. Its been outside for nearly 4 years, and the only rust I see is on the bucket, not the hydraulic rams.
 

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It depends....
I don't have inside storage, so I park the tractor outside. In the winter, I either have to leave the arms down, and curl the bucket into dump position, or set blocks under the bucket so it doesn't freeze to the ground. Also, during "rain" season, the bucket needs to be in the dump position so it doesn't fill with water. . One way or another, those rams are gonna be exposed. I've found out over the years, though, that the rams can take a LOT of weather related abuse, where as the bucket can't.
Yep those buckets will rust through quick with standing water in them all it takes is one knick in the paint for the moisture to get into the metal. I always try to level the bucket flat out, and boom down to keep the water from standing in the bucket.
 

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Rara avis
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After seeing several big "flakes" of green-painted steel peel off the inside of my loader bucket, I NEVER leave it parked outside without curling the bucket down. Once on the ground, you can relieve the pressure in the lines by moving the joystick in all four directions repeatedly until it stops moving. Its been outside for nearly 4 years, and the only rust I see is on the bucket, not the hydraulic rams.
Run you bucket into piles of gravel a couple of seasons and you won't worry about won't worry about paint flaking off your bucket...:D
 

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Man I thought I did that!
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Guys if you have a real hydraulic cylinder then it is chromed. Thats why they dont rust till you knick the chrome covering. The only time I saw a cylinder rust was on a dump truck hoist that is meant to be closed 99.99% of the time. Yes CHROME :dazed:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My neighbor has a backhoe that has been setting a few years, and the chrome is all pitted! Chrome apparently has its limits! It bums me out too, because I always wanted that hoe too!
 
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