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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:driving:

I have been wondering if any of the Bolens parts suppliers have paint available for the 1886, or is it a matter of trying to match it up as best I can?
If I had a color swatch I could take it to the automotive paint supplier and have them mix it for me.
Clear coat?
Emron?
Epoxy?
Choices, choices, is there a correct paint to use?



Bob G.
 

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There is information on paint colors in the various Yahoo groups for garden tractors, and specifically the Yahoo group for Bolens Large Frames like your 1886, bolensfmchtseriestractors, that deals primarily with Large Frames. You can search the messages for a keyword like "paint" and find a number of references.
 

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Bob

See if you can find a clean area under the seat or someplace and try to have it matched.
Pick one brand of paint and use their primer, color(basecoat) and clear(if desired). Try to avoid mixing primers and topcoats from different manufacturers. They can be mixed succesfully but can also be nightmares if the wrong combinations are chosen. Sure not worth the trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
armytank

The color of the paint on the bottom of the seat pan is the correct color?
If thats the case, I can just take the seat pan down and let them scan it with their color spectrum gun and get an exact match. We have a couple of good bodyshop suppliers here and they usually won't let an amature like me make a bad decision about paint combinations.

Bob, I know you used to do body and paint work. Is there very much difference in the quality of automotive finishes among the top manufacturers? Do you have a preference?

Will I need a air dryer for my compressor in order to avoid a moisture problem or should I wait until fairly dry weather and open the petcock to drain the water out before we paint? I guess I should do that anyway though.....Duhhhhhh

Bob G.
 

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There is really only a few key paint manufactuers out there. A lot of them have paints packaged in other names but its the same as what the higher priced major companies paiants are.....just the label is different. Dupont and Namsco (SP?) are the same except for label and price.....
Ditzler / PPG same same.

Valspar is perhaps the cheapest overall except for the Namsco brand, and is considered top line paint.

As stated its best to stay with the same comnpany brand for primer, sealer, top color, thinners and clear coats to keep from having a compatabiity issue. Some things like Lac thinner (automotive type) is compatable among brands, unlike the acrylic thinners.

Car Quest brand is nothing more than Dupont brand in a different package.

You can get by without a dryer per se, but you do need a good water moisture seperator, and proper temps at which to spray. Dryer is not the same as a water / moisture separator. Its always a good idea to drain as much out of tank and lines before doing any kind of work when using compressed air.

Those with air compressors may want to look at Harbor Freights automatic drain valve they have on sale right now for about $6.99....Usually about $10.00. It works like a charm, and for something coming from Harbor Fright, its actually a very good item, with the exception of the pneumatic tube they supply..........Thats the weak link, so I would replace it with some DOT pneumatic tube which is available at any large truck dealership / service shops (Mack, Peterbuilt, Volvo, Freight Liner etc) or any major automotive supply or industrial supplier. This automatic drain valve automatically keeps your tank drained and it does work........
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Paint Info

.:tractorsm

Thanks for the info Bob. Okay, a water/moisture seperator. aai use a lot of air tools these days it seems. Die gribders, ratchets, impacts, ECT and I am not good about getting down on my knees and draining the tank. I was cutting a piece of angle with a cut off tool and it kept freezing up. When it finally dawned on me I needed to drain the tank I got about agallon of water out of it before it cleared out. I noticed some oil in the water that came out, so it was sort of milkiy looking. Is this normal,and should I check the oil level in the compressor to make sure it isn't low?
The last thing I need to do is sieze up a compressor up.

:argh: :argh: :argh:

Bob G.
 

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yes, its quite normal for oil to get in a compressor tank. I check my oil in my compressor about once or twice a year. It only takes a drop or two of oil in a tank and then add moisture to make it look like a lot of oil is being used or ost, but its not usualy the case.

Since you do not like having to drain that tank (actually a bad practice to get into) go for the auto drain valve and be done with it. Accumulated water makes for a rusty tank inside and can lead to premature tank failure, as well as introducing water into air tools which when used, and put away will tend to rust internaly etc. Its still possibe to get frost and ice when using air tools in cold weather, unless you go with a real dryer (pretty pricey) but the commonly avaiable moisture separators usually do a good enough job for most uses.
 
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