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:argh:

I will soon be painting My 1944 allis chalmers B the man who took the dents out for me said sintari paint is good for my price range i have never heard of the stuff. any other suggestions. not too spendy oh and any tips on painting?
 

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welcome klutchman04 l have never heard of it are you going to paint it with a paint can or do you got a paint booth and paint sprayer ???? let me and all know how it turns out

BTW do you got any pics of the allis ??
 

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Thought maybe you might get beter response on the Allis board, am sure bigallis has lots of info for you on this topic.
caseman-d
 

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I assume your referring to Dupont "Centari". Yes, Dupont Centari is a premium grade acrylic enamel. If you add catalyst hardener to it, it would be just about equal to Duponts top grade Imron. Centari has been around for many many years and it just may be one of the most widely used acrylic enamels in use by automotive refinishers today. I sprayed my first car with it back when I was a teenager and thats quite a ong time ago, so its a well proven product during all these years. Its commonly used in the basic colors for fleet painting of trucks etc.

If you spray this or any other automotive enamel, make sure you use fisheye eliminator in it, as it will possibly save you a lot of grief. Just consider ficheye eliminator as cheap insurance.
 

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if you have an agco they have an enamel allis paint i have used and on my last project i used car quest allis chalmers orange it didn't cover as well as the agco paint so i used more coats but it was a lot cheaper
 

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klutch i use martin seynour paint from napa have for years and rustoleum paint ive heard of the paint yer talkin bout and saw a b painted wth it had good shine n finish
 

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Originally posted by Chipmaker
I assume your referring to Dupont "Centari". Yes, Dupont Centari is a premium grade acrylic enamel. If you add catalyst hardener to it, it would be just about equal to Duponts top grade Imron. Centari has been around for many many years and it just may be one of the most widely used acrylic enamels in use by automotive refinishers today. I sprayed my first car with it back when I was a teenager and thats quite a ong time ago, so its a well proven product during all these years. Its commonly used in the basic colors for fleet painting of trucks etc.

If you spray this or any other automotive enamel, make sure you use fisheye eliminator in it, as it will possibly save you a lot of grief. Just consider ficheye eliminator as cheap insurance.
Ok whats fisheye eliminator??????
caseman-d
 

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Originally posted by caseman-d
Ok whats fish eye eliminator??????
caseman-d
Its a additive that you put in paint to keep it from fisheyeing. Which means it looks like a fish eye might be one or alot grouped together. Mainly cause by oils from your fingers or other contaminates.
Jody
 

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Originally posted by bigallis
huh thts new one on me never heard of tht stuff:elephant:
As Jodyand said, it stops or elimiates fisheyes in paint...You know how water can bead up or how water reacts when it contacts a drop of oil it sort of forms a ring or circle, well that is possible for paint to do from any source of oil.........be it from the spray gun, compressor or just a droplet in the air. WD-40 is notoriously hard to get rid of and items that ever had WD40 on them really need a dose of fisheye eliminator. It essentially does to paint what detergent does to water........it makes it flow out better and have less surface tension so it does not try and move away from a spec of residue. Usually really heavy bodied paints have enough body to keep it in place until it starts to tack, but most automotive and fine finish paints are a lighter body, so its pretty common and cheap to use it as a safeguard in having a botched paint job...

IIRC I paid about $6.00 for a gal container of it years ago and all you need is about an ounce to a quart or so.........so a little goes a long long way. Its available at all automotive paint supply houses as well as most major paint companies like Sherwin Williams etc.
 

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Fisheye occurs when you have surface contaminants, (especially oil and silicone) still on the surface to be painted. I do use fisheye eliminator. Good explanation above. Common agents that cause fisheye: Polishing compounds, lubricants, silcone, wax, armor all type products.

Also, it is important to use wax and grease remover before painting. PPG DX330 (solvent based) or DX 394 (water based) work great. Just spray on and wipe off. Also be sure to use disposable clean wipers for removal of wax and grease remover.

I am partial to PPG Paints myself. Thats because I use them all the time. I got certfied from them last summer as a paint tech. Not that it is needed, but it does improve your efficiency.
 

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I'm not talking rattle can paints here but painit that must be reduced and sprayed such as automotive paints or othe industrial finishes. While some may swear by Rustoleum, IMHO it sucks. It uses a very slow temp thinner, so it takes a considerably longer time to setup tack free or get to the point of being able tobe handled. You can use naptha and some thinner called VG & P or something along those lines which is a faster reducer and sold in most paint or home builder supply stores, but Rustoleum prefers you to use their brand of thinner. Their primer also leaves a lot to be desired, as it takes so long to dry, and its hard to sand if your after a nice finish.

But take automotive paints as a whole (no brand names in particular) and they are suited to only spray application. Its a real pain to even try and brush as small area with an automotive spray paint, so don't even try it. Its made for spray application only. YOu can use different temperature sensitive reducers so you can match the ambient air temp your working in with the paints / reducers drying specs so it still will dry quick at low temps and not too fast at high temps. You can even use regular lac thinner in most any automotive primer or finish coat, for a reducer even if it is a enamel base finish. Some colors may blush when you use lac thinner / reducer but if its allowed to dry without much humidity or if its painted inside this is not a problem. There are a few colors lac thinner used in enamel will show the blush more than other colors, but its mainly in metallic based paints.

Usually the smallest container size is a quart unless you go with a lac then you can get pints, but considering that the paint is thinned considerably before use, its a lot of paint for the price.

Imron (Dupont brand) and others like paints are super hard and durable, however they will chip and scratch so they are not bullet proof, and cost more than regular acrylic based enamels do. Bigget problem with Imron and other like products is touch up at a later date, unless it has been changed and a work around has been found since I learned this, is touch up is hard to do on Imron type paints, as usually an entire surface has to be refinished for it to work right. This is not the case with acrilic and standard enamels, as they can be compounded in and blend in quite nice........its the way standard automotive refinishing touchup has been done for years and still is, although sometimes refinish of entire panel or part is easier in some cases.

There was an old wifes tale that if you used silicon carbide sandpaper it could lead to fisheyes, as it leaves a residue behind, So if it was not rinsed and cleaned properly after sanding with S-C type paper you could have problems. This is pure bull$hit. Silicone and silicon are two different animals. One is in lubricants and sealants the other is a hard mineral and not related to each other, so wet or dry paper will not leave any residue other than dust etc behind that will make a fisheye appear.

Unless I was gong to show the equipment in a show or have it on display I would not spend the money on acrylics, but would use the base line enamels, as they will hold up just fine and are probably inline with what it was painted with to begiin with.

You'll save in the neighborhood of 50% of the price by going with standard enamels of automotive paints over using acrylics and a lot more saved by not going the Imron route.

Hardener can be added to most paints even base line enamels, and its standard practice to add them to most acrylics but then again it makes the paint chip if it gets dented, whereas it may not have chipped off so bad if hardener was not used.

You wold be surprised how easy automotive spray paints made for spray application go on as compared to trying to get a finish with Rustoleum and other types of paint thats use is primarily inteded to be brush application.

And don't foregt to pick up some tack rags if your looking for a nice nub free finish. They are dirt cheap and do the job or removing dust and lint, that you otherwise think you wiped or blew off the surface, trust me a tack rag will find all kids of stuff you missed.

Primers are available in many forms. Sandable and non sanding. Non sanding does not mean you can't sand it, but its maian use is for new items that should be able to be primed and painted without the need to go back and fillin tiny imperfections. Its hard sanding but still sandable. Sandable is usually meant to be used as spot repairs and filling in imperfections, and prime again fill some ore missed areas and prime again and then finally a wetsand before finish coat application. You can get primer sealers which work fine if yur applying paint to a surface previously painted that your not sure is copatable with what your applying to it now. There are primer fillers, which are a heavy body primer made to fill slight imperfections by buildup of primer . These usually require a final wetsand before finish coat is made. Dupont 131S is one such primer. Its very heavy for a quart can of this stuff and pretty pricey, but it does a great job.
No matter what brand you go with all of the major manufacturers have like products, as well as lower grades of paints at varying prices. All makers have one or more brands and most are really the same product but in different packaging.

You can use glazing putty (red lac or green lac putty to fill imperfections, but since its a solvent based filler it is prone to cracking and poping out. It needs to be applied over a primed surface, so don;t apply it to bare metal as it more than likely will eventually ppop out. Same for previously painted surfaces when using lac putty. Its best to hit the surface with primer first then apply putty, as it can make the spot blister at a later date due to reactin with the previously applied paint. They make a 2 part scratch and imerfection filler that works great and is not prone to the problems associated with lac putty but its more $$ but depending on its application may be worth the extra money to use it. Its mixed like bondo is.

Bondo should always be aplied to a bare metal surface, as if its on rust or primer or finish coat its eventually going to turn loose and crack and come out in that area as it does not adhere well to paints etc, even if it gives you the impression its stuck hard and fast.

Give the automotive paints a try, and I bet you will like them. No paint truly hides any imperfections. All it really is, is a different color to whats already under there.
 
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