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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I just made a hefty purchase of N parts to fix my radiator issue and address a couple more small concerns while I got the thing apart. Compression test revealed 80 80 80 35 across cylinders (1-4) dry ---- Wet 80 80 80 75 ------ Supposedly no response to addition of oil wet indicated a problem with burnt exhaust valves. The 4th cylinder probably has a ring problem aiding to it loss of compression. Funny thing is that this tractor has never smoked nor burned any oil. It still runs pretty strong but I could tell that at least one cylinder might be a little low. Factory compression (perfect overhauled engine) should be at least 120 120 120 120, so I am running a pretty tired engine that is nearly 35% off of normal spec, but it could be worse I imagine.
Any ideas or insight on this????

I got a new radiator, support pads, tuneup parts including rotor, distributor cap, condensor, plugs, points, kingpin for front axle, new battery box, radiator hoses, fuel lines, misc gaskets for oil plugs, fuel screens, etc. --- Nothing too major just good maintenance stuff.

Well, will try to post full pictures of the replacement of the radiator and all associated parts.

Cheers,
Andy
 

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Sounds like you have your work cut out for you!:D
So are you going to overhaul the engine now or are you going to wait untill fall? If there is such a thing down on the bayou!!!:cheers:

How much property are you taking care of and is this your only tractor?

Thanks for sharing!:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is my only big tractor. I used to have a Ford 861 Powermaster that was a great tractor but I didn't have my workshop built yet (and I still don't) and I would never leave any tractor outside for any length of time. Plus the wife thought I was kinda strange (not the first time nor the last) for having a few extra tractors around. I maintain about 10 acres here of mixed horse pasture land, fields, and woods with the 8N and maintain about 2 acre lawn with the GT5000.

I think I will probably wait. I am not setup as a machinist shop and I am trying to get in touch with a good reputable and affordable shop that will assist me in restoring the block after a breakdown. I think that a good kit will run around $400 and the block/honing work might be around $200-300 --- so by the time I finish including extra parts, gaskets etc I will probably be close to $1K. Not too shabby for another 55 years!!!!!!!!!! :D :D :D

Anyone know the prices of engine work for something relatively simple like this flat-4?

Thanks
Andy
 

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It is kind of a less than desirable fix but at least it might work for good while until you decide to rebuild the engine. Have you thought about adding a can of Restore? It is supposed to raise the compression substantially and help an engine on its last leg to keep on kicking. Just a thought. To be honest with you, in my opinion, if it is not smoking real bad, does not use oil, and pulls strong, does what you want it to..........I would just do the tune up, raditiator, and king pins and wish her well. Save the $1,000 for when you really need it in the future. Just a thought on an alternative course of action.
 

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Sounds like you use it quite a bit and would miss it while you have it torn down. Hopefully you can find someone to get it done as quickly as possible and still do a good job. I keep my 130 in the shed/shop as well I think it really helps them last as long as possible. Rain and the sun are really hard on tractors!! Are you going to tear it down yourself or have it done at the shop?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will tear it down myself and probably do everything minus the head mill work, honing, regrinding crankshaft, block work ----- I can probably handle rebuilding the oil pump, new rod bushings, and most everything else.

Well, I agree with Chief --- it will wait until at least this fall. I need the tractor too bad to try an overhaul and have it out of commission for any length of time. Plus, I could use the extra $ for my workshop plans.

Smiles,
Andy
 

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Andy, if by rod bushings, you mean the ones at the piston pin, they need to be pressed in and bored/honed to exact tolerance at the machine shop. The rod and main bearings are no sweat you could do them easily.:thumbsup:
 

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is your oil pressure good? if so you could likely get away cheap with a set of rings in #4 and lapping the valves with some grinding compound. if oil pressure is low you may want to consider bearings while it is apart
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oil pressure is great ----- 40+lbs at startup and it stays above 25 even after 3-4 hours on the tractor. Have heard some people with really worn engines dropping down to under 10 or less.

I am not an expert with a repair business or anything, :furious: ,
so can you shed some insight on lapping valves? Can this be done fairly easily from the valve access inspection plates on the side of the block? Can you go into more detail with the process?
Can I do this myself or have it machined?

I guess it depends on how bad the seats are and if hand lapping is going to help out with the valves. I believe the reason you're supposed to use the machine is that you can narrow the seat by cutting a slightly different angle on the seat than on the valve face. This causes the line of contact between the two to be narrow, which increases the pressure at the point of contact, which makes a tighter seal. I am concerned that if I lap them, the seat will get wider and wider; but it sounds like is may be cheap, & easy, and might last a while. Grind em or lap em?

Any more info?
Thanks

:homereat:
 

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Well grinding would be best, but if you just want to hang on a few more years, lapping may help them seal.

Not to lap the valves you would need to pop the head. What you do is remove the vavle, clean it, and the seat area good, and put just a bit of compond on the valve. Spin the valve on the seat, and it kinda grinds the valve, and seat to match so you get a better seal. You are realy not grinding THAT much, so seat wideing is not a big issue. BTW eaven if you DO grind, you still lap the valves in. That is what gives them the good seal.

Now as far as the rebuild goes.

OK you have the tin off....you have the head off......if you replace any rings, you have the pan off......... At that point, I think you would be unhappy with anything but a full rebuild. Lets put it this way. My N had a quicky rebuild about a year before I got it. Smokes like crazy. As the saying goes Do it right, use a fork.........no thats not right
:D

Do it right do it once.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Any problems removing head with stud bolts freezing up or breaking on you? Did you replace head gasket and if so what make/model did you use? You retorqued to 65lbs/on each with the head back on? Any problems with this phase of the operation?

I might just replace what I have and do the overhaul later in the fall, when I get my cement shop done. This gravel/dirt is not going to be fun to work on. (not to mention the dirt getting into the critical areas of the engine) HAHA

Use a fork and be done with it. Thanks for the insight. I have a lot to learn about all of these procedures. Thanks for sharing. Jody, you want to come over and videotape this for the rest of the forum to see? Outta be a whole heckva lot of fun to watch. :D



spinsmile
 

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Andy, just a tip on torquing the head, do this in stages, for 65 ft/lbs you could do 2 steps (40 then 65), but I still like to do in 3 ( 30 then 50 then 65). This will help keep the head from warping when you re-assemble.
 
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