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No offense ford fans i am partially one my self but half my family is TOTAL PREDJIDus against fords and the other half love em to death and my only experience with ford tractors was with an 8N and it was a semi good one and what i have heard is true. Such as the transmission get so hot it burns your legs. but i have thought maybe that is the muffler heating the transmission and the heat just transfers. and what i also heard is that the breaks are horrible and wich they were but what good i have heard is that they pull alot for there size and boy is that true good steering and much pulling but i do see alot of mechanical faults in what there is. I also have heard storys of many deaths on the old Fordson Regularr. Tell me what you think -Paul
 

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Well, I have not worked mine that hard yet, but as for the mechanical faults?? Just remember that the newest N out there is 50 years old. How many entry level new tractors will still be around in 50, 60+ years?
 

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Originally posted by klutchman04
No offense ford fans i am partially one my self but half my family is TOTAL PREDJIDus against fords and the other half love em to death and my only experience with ford tractors was with an 8N and it was a semi good one and what i have heard is true. Such as the transmission get so hot it burns your legs. but i have thought maybe that is the muffler heating the transmission and the heat just transfers. and what i also heard is that the breaks are horrible and wich they were but what good i have heard is that they pull alot for there size and boy is that true good steering and much pulling but i do see alot of mechanical faults in what there is. I also have heard storys of many deaths on the old Fordson Regularr. Tell me what you think -Paul
I can offer my insight as I have restored a number of Fords over the years. From 8Ns to 600 and 800 series, 861 Powermaster, Ford 3000s, Ford 4000s and Ford 6610. I have always maintained a Ford for my personal land use, but would never shy away from any good tractor whether it was an Oliver, JD, Case, MM, Farmall or Kubota. I am not a tractor brand lover, just a tractor lover. :)

As for as the Ford 8N, you do realize that over 500,000 of these were produced and sold within only a short 5 year timeframe. It is a 50yr. marvel to basic ingenuity and engineering. I am not ever aware of a problem with an overheating tranny. Have you ever seen the tremendously sized resevoir that stores the tranny and hydraulic fluid? It you get that to overheat, you have a much bigger problem than was ever standard on a good running 8N. Not too many problems with brakes on the 8Ns, more problems with some of the 2Ns and 9Ns with regard to the seals etc. Steering and pulling/plowing power is exception for a flat 4 gas design. Overall for the money, a good running especially restored 8N will last you a good 50 years with basic maintenance - no problem. That is exceptional. How many LT/GT/CUTs do you expect to be around and working in 2054? Probably not too many. :D :D :D

Well, I could go on and on. There was a Fordson Tractor that was referred to as the "Widow Maker" --- I think it was the steel wheel model which when carrying loads on rough/uneven surfaces would readily jolt the rider and the load.

Other than that, Fords have always been exceptionally good tractors. Both to work on (parts availability) and operation.

Just my opinion.
Andy
 

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I have heard a lot of the older folks talk about a certain model Ford tractor that was prone to flipping over if you pulled a load with it that was too heavy as well as flipping sideways on a grade very easy. Then again any tractor is prone to flipping on a side grade and any tractor can flip over backwards if a load is carried to high or attached to high up. I have seen an idiot (neighbor) hook up to a tree and use his rops as the tie down........his theory was to pull as hard as he could with both rear wheels engaged, to prevent tires from slipping, and allow the front end to raise up off the ground, and it would then give more constant pulling tension on his rope he had tied to the tree that he was going to cut and wanted to make sure it fell in the right direction. I later cut the tree down for him without the need of pulling with a tractor as he was intending to do.

Can't picture a tranny getting that hot........warm perhaps and only after some long hard hours of use.
 

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I think the tranny heating problem was with the old forson tractors, not sure why, possibly the worm drive differential??

Like Chipmaker said, ANY tractor can do a backflip if improperly hitched!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am not offending ford i just heard some storys and when i went and tried out this 8 N some storys were true and some were not. I actually plan to buy a ford someday, they are a bit handy with there three point. There a work horse. I thought maybe the trany heated up because the muffler next to it and heat transfer through metals. but i dont know I only worked it 2-3 hours and it got hot , I dont know there all different in there own way lol
 
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