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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Well I finally picked up a blade for it today just ended up going with a new one made by Behren's mfg I used it
for 2.5 hours today and it worked great so far. Back at it again tomorrow afternoon I have to service the finish mower
in the morning and mow my main yard with my regular lawn mower. So far this thing is great no issues other than the
starter hung just for a second once but other than that just great.


Dave


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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Spent the afternoon yesterday ( my post didn't post because I forgot to hit the post reply button yesterday!) working on the finish mower getting it ready for mowing. I stood it up and sharpened the blades
they were still fairly usable I have seen allot worse and the dealer said it would be a week or I could go to the next dealer about 30 miles so I looked them over and they had at least one more summer left in them so I just sharpened them and tomorrow I am going to hit the bottom with a flapper wheel to knock down any surface rust there wasn't any grass stuck on it. Then I have some rusty metal primer that I am going to coat the bottom with to protect it and then drop it down and grease everything up and get it ready to roll.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Today I got a coat of primer put on the mower bottom and put it back on its wheels getting ready for mowing tomorrow. Then I ran my grader blade the rest of the day working on a drainage ditch I'm building on my new land that joins my current property.

Dave

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I am trying to figure out what year my tractor is I know they were made from 77-82 but can't figure how to i.d. the year
the tag on the side of the trans has the model number and a couple numbers but no year I read that the engine is date
coded but can'f find the tag on the engine. If anyone has any info on this I would appreciate the help.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
fought the pto all morning think it was dirty but finally got it on the tractor greased everything and discovered that when the
dealer ran it for me to check out before buying it didn't have a belt on so I was hearing the gearbox which is nice and
quiet. But the tension spring was off so I reinstalled and put everything back together and I think I have a bad bearing it is
mowing but man it's loud it sounds like a noisy gear drive it's louder than the tractor. Anyway I see a bearing job in the future.

Dave
 

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If you mean a noisy spindle, there should be grease fittings on them and they are easily rebuildable. Easy to tell a bad spindle, just grab each blade and wiggle it. If it wiggles, the bearings are shot and need replaced. Waiting can destroy the housings however. As with most used equipment, people don't trade in in or sell it because it's perfect. On the contrary. Usually, a piece of equipment, especially one that is older, will need work yo make it right.
 

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You need to keep the PTO stub shaft CLEAN AND GREASED. Your local dealer will have a plastic PTO cover cover / guard that slips over the stub to keep it that way and same applies to the female coupler on ANY implement. They need to be clean inside and greased as well as the U joints on the PTO driveline. As a rule, I use a ziplock bag over the female end on all my implements to keep them clean and out of the weather. Easy on, easy off. All my hydraulic connections are always dust and dirt capped when not in use (tractor and implements) as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
If you mean a noisy spindle, there should be grease fittings on them and they are easily rebuildable. Easy to tell a bad spindle, just grab each blade and wiggle it. If it wiggles, the bearings are shot and need replaced. Waiting can destroy the housings however. As with most used equipment, people don't trade in in or sell it because it's perfect. On the contrary. Usually, a piece of equipment, especially one that is older, will need work yo make it right.
I did try to move it the other day and they seamed tight and greased them before trying it but the middle one didn't spin by
hand very well but was tight that is probably my culprit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
You need to keep the PTO stub shaft CLEAN AND GREASED. Your local dealer will have a plastic PTO cover cover / guard that slips over the stub to keep it that way and same applies to the female coupler on ANY implement. They need to be clean inside and greased as well as the U joints on the PTO driveline. As a rule, I use a ziplock bag over the female end on all my implements to keep them clean and out of the weather. Easy on, easy off. All my hydraulic connections are always dust and dirt capped when not in use (tractor and implements) as well.
I did grease all the pto parts before I ran it I will use the ziplock trick when storing it that's a good idea and check on the stub
shaft cover at the dealer. Thanks for the tips I need all the help I can get.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I agree I am going to pull it off and look it over I imagine those bearings are pressed
on the shaft so I'll have to have a machine shop or the dealer press on the new ones
I found the bearings new oem for about 28 bucks and I figure I will need two seals
and two bearings don't know of anything else unless it damaged something else.
I will call the dealer Monday and see what they can do it for if I bring them the spindle.

Dave
 

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If there is a nut on top of the spindle, they are not pressed on, If there is a nut, the nut secures the assembly and there will be a spacer inside that pre loads the bearings (how mine are on my mower deck). Even if they are pressed on, I suggest removing the inner dust shields on them so the grease can get in them when you grease the spindles.

I used to replace bearings every year until I figured out that removing the inner dust shields actually allows the bearings to get sufficient grease Have not replaced a bearing since.

You can probably get them cheaper at a bearing place like Motion Industries. Each bearing will have a catalog number etched into the body and you and bearing place can cross that number to various manufacturers. Bearings have been standardized for decades.

Pressed on isn't an issue here, I have a hydraulic arbor press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
If there is a nut on top of the spindle, they are not pressed on, If there is a nut, the nut secures the assembly and there will be a spacer inside that pre loads the bearings (how mine are on my mower deck). Even if they are pressed on, I suggest removing the inner dust shields on them so the grease can get in them when you grease the spindles.

I used to replace bearings every year until I figured out that removing the inner dust shields actually allows the bearings to get sufficient grease Have not replaced a bearing since.

You can probably get them cheaper at a bearing place like Motion Industries. Each bearing will have a catalog number etched into the body and you and bearing place can cross that number to various manufacturers. Bearings have been standardized for decades.

Pressed on isn't an issue here, I have a hydraulic arbor press.
I will check it out don't remember a nut but I'll look and not sure on the dust shields as to where they
are located I'll post a diagram of my spindle. We do have a Motion Industries about 10 miles from me
so I will check with them. So the bearings will be like auto bearings with the number on the race. I'll check them out and I have the JD bearing number it is 5WP29899 I got that from the diagram in the owners manual I found online. I really appreciate all the help I have worked on vehicles for years but not on allot of tractors. I've drove several tractors but not worked on them much.

Dave

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Yep, 9 is the pre load spacer and 1 is the preload nut. Part 5 is the expansion (tapered bush) that secures the assembly together. That is a 'Browning' bushing as it's called. and the drive pulley (6) is keyed to the shaft.

The upper and lower bearings (8) may have dust shields on both sides and if the do, remove the inner facing dust shield with a sharp edged knife or pointed pick and toss it. That will allow grease from part 21 to get into the bearings and prolong the life of them Your spindles are very similar to mine actually.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Yep, 9 is the pre load spacer and 1 is the preload nut. Part 5 is the expansion (tapered bush) that secures the assembly together. That is a 'Browning' bushing as it's called. and the drive pulley (6) is keyed to the shaft.

The upper and lower bearings (8) may have dust shields on both sides and if the do, remove the inner facing dust shield with a sharp edged knife or pointed pick and toss it. That will allow grease from part 21 to get into the bearings and prolong the life of them Your spindles are very similar to mine actually.
Ok I'll check them out and see I appreciate the help

Dave
 

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When you remove the top nut, you will have to use a small 3 jaw puller to extract the Browning busking as it's tapered and will be stuck in the pulley bore. remove the 2 or 3 bolts that are threaded into it. Those bolts are what you use to push the bushing into the tapered sheave to secure it. Browning's are real common in higher end machinery. Their presence tells you it's a quality assembly.
 
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