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My Pigs (Soon to be Bacon)

6185 Views 59 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  Argee
These are the pigs I'm raising for market. I've had them since June. They have a date with destiny on the 18th. I've named them, There is Hambone, Bacon, Pork Chop,Bacon Bits and Breakfast.

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Originally posted by Argee
The other I decided not to put the cost of surgery into her so we processed her.
Just found that amusing in a very morbid way I guess....
What happened to ole' Missy --- We processed her and here she is ---- HMMM Bacon....

(WELL WHAT DO YOU EXPECT --- THIS IS POST #666 FOR ME!!!)
:devil: :devil: :devil: :devil:

Can you tell me from which parts of the pig do they get like the HAM, PORK CHOPS, BACON, ETC?

Making me hungry --- I don't think I could have pigs --- I would want to eat them all. :D

Andy :pig:
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Re: beer

Originally posted by slipshod
The pig drank all those beers on the ground,keeps it moist while cooking.
Now, that is QUITE morbid....I mean is the pig killed before the fiery execution or during? ----- I would rather my meat (I guess)
look less like an animal half-baked to death with a fiery crisp hide and smoked head. Or is it just me? :skull: :skull: :skull:

Dunno...It might be fun for the Tractorforum.com party. ----- :pig:

Andy
:D
Slipshod,

I figured you all knew I was kidding since Louisiana/Cajuns are known for Cochon de lait. This is one of Acadiana's most famous and most delectable dishes -- marinated, pit-roasted young suckling pig, sliced thin and served with gravy, on a plate or on a po-boy. The mere aroma of this dish is enough to make your knees buckle, not to mention the taste. I was just trying to get the goat stirred up and have some fun. In Louisiana, it is a special treat!!! :pig: :pig: :pig:

Andy
Slipshod, you are on a POSTING CRAZE today. :D --------
HAHAHA

Andy
So did the pigs meets their DESTINY on the 18th?

Did the pigs officially become bacon on the 18th as promised?

:pig: :devil: :pig: :devil: :pig:
Originally posted by Argee
I don't do any of my own butchering. I just need to get them to the slaughter house and tell them how I want them cut and packaged. Then go back and pick up my cut and wrapped pork.
Wiping the blood off of your own hands, Argee? :skull:
How do they slaughter them - slit and hanging or some other method? Any ideas? Yummy Bacon, Pork and Ham!!! :pig:

Andy
Re: Loading Pigs in the pouring rain

Originally posted by Argee
Now that I've had a day to reflect on it, yesterdays events were rather comical. I've had the appointment with the processor for a couple of months, so come rain or shine, the show must go on.

As fate would have it, it was pouring rain when it came time to load the pigs. My two buddies were to be at my place at 7:00AM with their pigs (3) to help me load mine (5) in the trailer so we could make the 9:00AM appointment at the processors 30 miles away. Well when I went out at 6:30 to hook the trailer to my truck it was pouring. The weather report said it was going to keep raining all day. I had the trailer backed up to the fence and a portion of the fence taken out by the time they showed up at 7:30 with just one pig in the back of his 4WD (need a ladder to get in the back end of it) Ford pickup. When I looked at these boys (they're in their early 30's so they're boys to me) all covered with pig [email protected]# from head to toe, I casually asked where the other two pigs were. Well it seems after struggling getting the one 230 lb. squirming gilt in the truck, they let their guard down on the other two. When they opened the gate to get another one on, one decided it was time to make a break for freedom. After a 15 minute chase around the barn, the house and the perimeter of his 33 acres they got it contained and back in the pen, all this in the pouring rain mind you. At this point, they were just to wore out to pick the other two up the required 4+ feet to get them in the back of the truck. So needless to say, they showed up at my place with one pig and banking on the hope that I would take the trailer down to pick the other two up. I was a little leary that if we loaded all the pigs together at once they would probably fight and if we went back down to his place we'd never make to the appointment on time. So it was decided that we would make two trips. We loaded my 5 onto the trailer with minimal problems . The one big boar that I thought might give us problems, jumped into the trailer on his own after witnessing a couple of squealing gilts being coaxed on. We then drove the now 45 mile trip back to his place to get the other two. It was uneventful.

Of course my one buddy rode with me to the slaughter house for both trips. I had to keep reminding him to role his window down because of the lingering oder wafting off his clothes.

All in all, it's a day I'm glad is over, but the comical antics of my two friends will make it one worth remembering. And of course as time dims the memory of the event, I will embellish the story so it's never forgotten.
Very interesting reading! How much would you say you had invested in your 5 pigs for this past 6 months or so? Just curious as others have mentioned the problems with disease, death and the overall expense of having your own pigs. How much did they cost to buy, maintain, feed vs. how much meat you can get from them? Plus, how do they keep track of "your pigs" at the processing plant? You might bring in fresh pig meat only to leave with Hormel and Jimmy Dean factory fresh spam. :D J/K

Andy
:pig: :pig: :pig:
Originally posted by Argee
Not really wiping blood off my own hands. I had to kill one earlier this year because of a prolapsed rectum. I only ended up with 30 LBS of sausage.

I take them to the slaughter house because they're a licensed USDA inspected facility and if you want any further enhancements done, ie:smoking hams and bacon, it has to come from that type of facility. A USDA inspector is present when you deliver the animals, he witnesses the kill and inspects the meat, organs, etc. for any disease. The kill process is quick and easy. They slit the throats and hang them by the back legs so they bleed out completely. They only slit the jugular so the wind pipe is still intact so the lungs can still function, which allows for total bleed out. I know this may sound cruel to some people, but it's over in seconds.
Just kidding about the "blood on your hands" --- I just wanted to find an excuse to use the :skull: :skull: :skull: smilie! I did not know there was so much inspection related issues with the slaughter house process. Plus, I figured that the slaughter house facility would also pass the meat along the line for cutting, smoking and/or final butchering --- like a one shop -- drop em, cut em and pack em up shop. :pig:

Thanks for the info.
Andy
Re: Re: Re: Loading Pigs in the pouring rain

Originally posted by Argee
If I was to count the 3 pigs I lost, WAY TO MUCH:eek:
I purchased the piglets back in April for $50 each. The feed which consists of ground corn, soy and alfalfa runs $9-10 per 100LBS. I fed a little over 3000 LBS this year. I buy it fresh ground from a farmer about 25 miles south of here in 500 LBS installments. There is also the penicillin, and vet bills.

I mark each pig with a # when I take them to slaughter. The slaughter house in turn, keeps that # and my name with each carcass. It's a matter of trust for the most part. Where I take them, they are an old firm with many happy clients, me being one of them.

I sell them for $1 on the hoof. The kill fee, cut and wrap and any smoking is up to the buyer. I deliver them to the slaughter house and thats the end of it for me, I give the buyer a number to give with my name when they call to to give cutting instructions to the butcher. It works out pretty well.

I don't get rich raising pigs. I do it because I enjoy it and usually it keeps the cost of the one I keep for myself at a minimum. Not so this year.
What do you mean, you sell them for $1 on the hoof? Thanks for all of the info! BTW, how long have you been raising pigs & what type/breed of pig is it that you raise (or that is common for food)?

Thanks
Andy
How about I send you a nice bag of fresh Louisiana "Admin Grown" satsumas and you send me a nice slab of "Argee's Best" bacon and ham? :D :D :D

Argee is my piggy friend. :pig:

:smiles:

Andy
Originally posted by Argee
:truth:
We might be able to work something out.:pedro:
:pig:
Hmmmmmmm... Maybe Argee has eaten all of the yummy ham and bacon for himself. Cmon, Argee ---- these sweet juicy satsumas are a rare site for certain up in chilly Michigan --- You could probably trade them for a cow or something. :bull:

HAHA.

Andy
Originally posted by Argee
Have you looked at the cost of beef lately? Right through the roof because of what I understand, MCD in Canada. It would take an orchard full of satsumas for one cow.
:smiles:

As far as satsumas for some of my fine pork, make me an offer!:smiles:
GOBBLED GOBBLED ALL OF MY JUICY :pig: MEAT, ARGEE????

No room left for juicy satsumas???? How about a nice box of satsumas for a slab of sweet hickory bacon? I mean a slab you could bruise Slipshod's leg with!!! :D :D :D

Any takers? Piggy?
:pig: :pig: :pig:

HAHAHA :D
Let me know.

Andy
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Goodie Goodie my little frozen critter from the :pig: house ----
Send me a huge slab of bacon and maybe some juicy ham (sweetening the sugar pot???) --- YUMMY YUMMY --- :pig: :pig:

I will post pics of me chomping into it --- like a :pig:

Andy
:D
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