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what are some pros and cons of both of em. I am beginning to look for some welders seeing i need one now. Do i really want one in 220 volt are they that much better? oh yeah what are some good brands. I hear miller and lincoln
army :tractorsm
 

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Lincoln and Miller noth make fine machines. HObard and ESAB also makes good machines, but I think Miller and Lincoln are the most popular brands.

Both types of welders have their purppose. A stick is good on heavy materials and you can get quite a large variety of rods to weld just about anything. If you deal with lots of painted and rusted metals stick would be the way unless you clean it up first. MIG is easy as running a caulking or hot glue gun. It does not make much smoke if you use the gas process however the flux core wire is just as smokey as a stick electrode is. If your gonna deal with light gage metals MIG would be the way to go. Most of the smaller migs only weld up to perhaps 1/4 or 5/16, and then its with flux core wire. If most of your welding is outside in windy or breezy conditions flux core or stick would be better than gas.


Just what is going to be your primary use for this welder?

Yes a 220 VAC model is much better than a 115 unit, as they usually can wled heavier metals and have better duty cycles. Most of the more common sizes of MIG or Stick units commonly found in home and farm shops will require a 50 or 60 amp power source.

Lincolns AC/DC 225 machine is a great stick welder. Miller makes and equivelant model and so does the other two companies mentioned above. All make a great entry level MIG machine as well. Odds are unless you really know your welders, you could be blindfolded and use machines from each of ther big four manufacturers and never know the difference or what brand you were using.
 

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I spent all day Sunday with my buddy Jim building a small 8 x 5 trailer for my tractor to haul firewood and whatnot around my property. He has a Hobart IronMan 210. We used a grinder type cut off wheel to cut the steel with, I did the edge clean up on the steel pieces and Jim did the welding. We built the entire trailer minus the wood floor and sides in about 6 hours. I am really impressed with how that welder performs. My understanding is the Miller owns Hobart and their MIG welders are very similar. I am considering a Miller 251 or a Hobart IronMan 250 in the future. I am still doing my research. I down loaded the owner's manuals for the Miller 251 & 210 and the Hobart 250 & 210. I still need to read throught them and compare. I may not need a MIG welder as big and the 251 or 250 but they allow you to weld upto 1/2" material. Jim's IronMan 210 seemed to do and excellent job in my trailer and on the truck bed he is building for his Freightliner.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I plan on using this welder to make a trailer 18' by 7'and a small one for my atv. and just some small projects like making a gocart frame. just stuff like that
 

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WE have had a "Miller thunder bolt 225" (stick) for about 25 years, and it has been agreat machine!!! It is now dead and is time for a new welder, we have decided on the "miller 225 AC/DC" welder for our uses.

For general farm use a stick is likely the way to go, if you plan to do body work or restorations ( tractor or other wise), a MIG is what you are looking for, if you've got the $$$$, both would be great!!:D
 

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I would not necessarily base a choice on welders on the thickest metal it can weld. I have been welding most of my life and can count the number of times I really had to weld some seriously heavy material on one hand. Even then a few passes on a v grooved joint makes use of even a smaller welder a possiblity.

Most of us home shop types always seem top overbuild when we make or repair something anyhow. I know for a fact I do, but there really is nothing wrong with overbuilding if the weight don't affect its use.

Stick may be a bit harder to use in some positions, but is a worthy machine. MIG like I posted before is just about like using a hot glue gun.
 
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