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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question regarding my 1959 MF35 23c (not multipower). Hoping someone far more knowledgeable can help.
We have some steeper parts on our property which have to be approached slowly and carefully when mowing. I am more comfortable going down a steeper slope until...... I noticed yesterday, when decending in low range 1st gear the 35 started descending the slope slowly as you would expect in 1st gear, low range. Then, halfway down the slope, things start to uncomfortably speed up. Still in gear, still mowing and the clutch has not been touched. It's almost like being in neutral. I was under the impression that low gear meant a slow journey without the need to use brakes (which as you know I'm not the best anyway). Could my clutch be slipping? Is it time for a fluid change? Should I be in ground pto as opposed to engine pto? Has me baffled and a bit nervous to boot.
Thanks in advance
 

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Good Morning Revilo, welcome to the forum.

I suspect that your rear tires were losing traction as you were mowing down the slope, causing your tractor to speed up, with all other operating parameters remaining constant. Was the grass wet with dew? In the worst case scenario, as the tractor skids down the slope, one rear wheel will start turning backwards. That's when it gets scary. I suggest that you plant some trees on this slope and keep off of it with your tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks HarveyW. My tyres were definitely not skidding. Grass was dry. I did a few runs without issue and then got halfway down the slope and lost all 1st gear low range engine braking. I wonder whether hydraulic/transmission fluid somehow fouled the clutch and caused it to slip. Clutch functioned normally on the level.
 

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1949 TED; 1957 FE 35 ; 1953 Bristol 20 ; 1965 MF 2130
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I don't have a reply to your problem but when working on steep ground its helpful for your safety to switch the wheels over, IE put the left one on the right side and the right one on the left side, due to the dished wheel hub this will increase the wheel base giving you a safer turning, I used to work on a hilly farm and all our tractors were set on wide wheels

regards
Bob
This might explain it better; www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLsh5zLLQN0
 
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