Tractor Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a lot of old wheel weights that I would like to melt down to make weight blocks. Anyone know the easyest, and cheapest way to do it? Any tips, tricks, etc are welcome. Thanks for any help!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
Easiest and cheapest way is light up a bag of charcoal in a grill and use an old pot you won't everuse to cook in again. Do it outside, and be very carefull about who and what is around you. Molten lead is HOT:devilish: and water or sweat dripping in will explode into steam instantly causing hot lead to splash as well. Obviously you want to be outdoors and not breath the fumes. Be carefull while pouring as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
Melting point of lead is 327 (f) 163 (c) and heavy, most effectively done in a cast iron kettle .

I use a small furnace to do the same thing to make cast bullets, recommend that you use bolt cutters to cut and save the ends and discard the steel clip. Most importantly wear gloves (welding type) and melt only as much as you can comfortably handle at one time!!

I would need to know what material you are going to mold the weights in before advising further, except to say BE CAREFUL as Joe Said!!

It'll sear the meat/hide off a buffalo!! Protect yourself!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
havent come up with any mold ideas yet. looking for something I can put in my weight box, but still small enough to handle easly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
Muffing tins work for making managable sized lead ingots. If they get much bigger than that, you need 2 hands to handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Paul,tis a funny thing that you should ask about lead for weights as I have seen a 100# casting of old weights and was supprised at the quality... It was cast into a mold made of casting sand with a spray releasing agent... It was smelted down and trash screeded off and poured... He also make up fishing weights for me and they are as good looking as store bought.... All of his supplies come from a potters whse...Maybe it will work for your molds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Paul

Now your talking my most favorite thing.....melting metals........
Check out my website in the foundry section...all you need to now about a burner and mold is there.......

You would not need a permanent type furnace but trust me, anything built up and around the lead being melted and shielding the burner would be most beneficial in a quicker more efficient melt.....A good burner can be assembled very easy from common plumbing items for under $10.00 and this burner can be used for more than just melting lead.......or you could get one of those weed burners from Harbor Freight and use it, or buyt a new or used turkey cooker, use the burner for the heat source and then give it all to the wife to cook the turkey or have a fish fry with......


Don't over heat the lead or you will burn a lot of the good other nexcessary alloys out of it...........Keep any moisture or water well away from any molten metal. Just stack up a bunch of bricks around the container your using to melt the lead in so you have a sort of enclosure which will retain more of the heat...

Molds can be easy to fashion from channel irons, angle irons etc......my webiste gives you an idea on what is needed.......and how to do it, with angle iron and flat stock but channel iron would make a wider and thicker and easier to use shape when finished. Just make sure you have draft to the mold so it will release when chilled......If you can electric weld you can easy throw a piece of steel pipe together with a piece of sheet steel for the bottom for a crucible to melt the lead in......


Don't worry about cleaning off the little steel S shaped clips, they are easily removed from the molten lead with an old spoon or perferated ladle........ Once it starts to melt, and it appears grey looking, take a piece of pine stick or limb (make sure its dry) and slowly insert it into the molten lead and stir........the resin in the wood will flux the melt and make it appear shiney........you can skim the dross (crap and oxides etc that float on the surface) with a long handled spoon.......insert piece of wood again and withdraw, remove from heat and pour........You can tell its getting too hot if it starts to form an oxide on the surface very quickly after fluxing, and it starts looking like the lead is turning to powder......stay upwind and don't breath the vapors.............


I have the front bumper on my JG 335GX filled with lead, the front bumper / grill guyard I made for my Ford 1720 all filled with lead, my rear wheel weights on my JD is filled with lead.........its easy to work with.

The front bumper on my Ford is made of channel and angle iron. I used to have suitcase weights on front, now all I have is my bumper / brush guard assembly as it has as much weight as the original suitcase weights used to have and there are no weights hanging down anywhere, its all built into the channels and angles by melting lead and pouring the cavietes with lead.......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Originally posted by bontai Joe
Muffing tins work for making managable sized lead ingots. If they get much bigger than that, you need 2 hands to handle.
Muffin tins work but not for long. They heat up way to quick and have a tendency to make the lead stick, especially if there are any bumps or dents.....the cast iron type work great however, and some of the older thin stamped tins will actually bond to the lead. You need something that will hold the shape, be durable enought to bump and knock the chilled casting out of, and be ready to fill again.

Unless your making a mold of precise and detailed sections sand cast molds would be a waste of time if your only looking for a basic shape like a rectangle or round section.........which is easily obtainable with sturctural steel molds from channel iron or angle irons etc......channels already have the draft need built into the side pieces, and the ends need to be made so they also have a bevel or draft to them for the lead to release when chilled......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,567 Posts
Originally posted by Ingersoll444
I have a lot of old wheel weights that I would like to melt down to make weight blocks. Anyone know the easyest, and cheapest way to do it? Any tips, tricks, etc are welcome. Thanks for any help!!!
I used to swage bullets and a buddy and I used to melt down lead from bullet back stops and other sources to get the lead. As already mentioned; LOTS of ventilation for the lead fumes, a spoon or laddle to skim off the slag and trash that floats to the top (we had to skim off the old bullet jackets as well), NEVER allow ANY fluids especially water to come in contact with the vat of hot lead as it will virtually explode. We used some Lee 1 lb. bar ingots. Be sure to wash your hands VERY well after handling the lead, you will be surprised how much of the oxide gets on your hands an clothing. Here is the lead melting pot I have:

<img src="http://www.midwayusa.com/midwayusa/applications/mediasvr.dll/image?saleitemid=637732">

Lee Production Pot Four Furnace 110 Volt

Lee and Lyman make nice lead ingots

<img src="http://www.midwayusa.com/midwayusa/applications/mediasvr.dll/image?saleitemid=361222">

Lee 4-Cavity Ingot Mold

<img src="http://www.midwayusa.com/midwayusa/applications/mediasvr.dll/image?saleitemid=496285">

Lyman Ingot Mold

These are the lead bars that I carry around in the back of my truck......about 400 lbs. worth. Really helps out the traction and does not take up that much space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Originally posted by Archdean
Melting point of lead is 327 (f) 163 (c) and heavy, most effectively done in a cast iron kettle .

I use a small furnace to do the same thing to make cast bullets, recommend that you use bolt cutters to cut and save the ends and discard the steel clip. Most importantly wear gloves (welding type) and melt only as much as you can comfortably handle at one time!!

I would need to know what material you are going to mold the weights in before advising further, except to say BE CAREFUL as Joe Said!!

It'll sear the meat/hide off a buffalo!! Protect yourself!!!
So Dean,

When did you join the Black Watch?? I thought you were an airplane guy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
Originally posted by balmoralboy
So Dean,

When did you join the Black Watch?? I thought you were an airplane guy?
Jim,

You might be surprised at what joins me!!

Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial at my age!!!!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,428 Posts
I was wondering if any of you guys ever used the lead weights from a tire store. I had read somewhere that these worked well for remelting but didn't know if they charged for them or what?

Andy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Originally posted by chrpmaster
I was wondering if any of you guys ever used the lead weights from a tire store. I had read somewhere that these worked well for remelting but didn't know if they charged for them or what?

Andy
I use them for lots of things, but in another form of course...... Some places will sell em to you other places will give them to you. I find them and will pick them up anywhere I see them such as parking lots, gas stations etc etc..........you would be surprised how many are laying around. I can get lots of them from a local tire shop for free..........I know a few folks use them for casting bullets for reloading.......and of course for use in their muzzle loaders
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by chrpmaster
I was wondering if any of you guys ever used the lead weights from a tire store. I had read somewhere that these worked well for remelting but didn't know if they charged for them or what?

Andy
Well I work at a car dealer, so I have a ready supply, but most places just toss them. You have a shop, or dealer you go to a lot? Just ask them. Be preapared to get a bucket full of tire lables, valve stems, cig butts, etc to sift through. Just ask around, you will find some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,567 Posts
Originally posted by Chipmaker
I use them for lots of things, but in another form of course...... Some places will sell em to you other places will give them to you. I find them and will pick them up anywhere I see them such as parking lots, gas stations etc etc..........you would be surprised how many are laying around. I can get lots of them from a local tire shop for free..........I know a few folks use them for casting bullets for reloading.......and of course for use in their muzzle loaders
You can use tire weights but you should be aware that tire weights are composed of a lead alloy which is high in antimony which hardens the lead. This may be a desirable quality in rifle bullets but may not be for pistol bullets as they may not expand and mushroon well on impact.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Originally posted by Ingersoll444
Well I work at a car dealer, so I have a ready supply, but most places just toss them. You have a shop, or dealer you go to a lot? Just ask them. Be preapared to get a bucket full of tire lables, valve stems, cig butts, etc to sift through. Just ask around, you will find some.
Matters not what I find in a bucketfull of free stuff........I just dump it all in a #10 or 12 sized crucible and fire it up......if its burnable it goes up in smoke if its not it gets skimmed off as dross.................A #12 crucible is capable of holding 12 full pounds of liquid aluminum, and when full of lead, well I can't lift it........So I usually have to ladle what I melt out........which is not bad....Presently working on (since spring been playing with it) a new furnace that will handle a #30 / 40 crucible.....that will handle a full 5 gal bucket of weights and then some........I have a couple of castings I want to make that exceeds my capacity I presently have.......the castings are cast iron or aluminum ends for benches etc, and a large back yard bell out of bronze........after I poured the castings for the wifes trellis, I just knew i needed a bigger furnace and more capacity, as some of those castings I barely squeeked through on having sufficient molten cast iron to fill the molds........some of which go approx 30 plus pounds each....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the tips everyone. I got to start getting stuff together.


Now I have an old table top propane grill, you think that will put out enough heat to do the trick?? Also what is the best thing to use to melt it in? Any type of pot? I have a few laying around, but they are aloy. I am guess that will not work. I was also thinking of using a foot or so lenght of pipe,maybe 1 1/2, or two ", with a screw on cap on the ends to cast the lead into. How does that sound?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
The pipe would be a one time deal as you will never get the lead out when its cooled down.

You can use an old cast iron frying pan, kind of shallow but it would work.

The grill would work but it may be kindo f ineffecient...but if you put a shield of brick etc around it to help hold and direct the heat into the crucible, it would help a lot.

You could use an aluminum container theoretically, but you would have to watch yuour temperature very well as aluminum has a low shear strength point when hot..........but it would be a risk......Aluminum melts much higher than lead, but it starts loosing its strength at much lower temps, so it would not be a good idea.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Originally posted by Chipmaker
The pipe would be a one time deal as you will never get the lead out when its cooled down.

Thats what I am planing. Just weight blocks to put in a weight box. That way I would have the weight of the pipe, pluss the lead inside. Also the added benafit of no lead to handle, and worry about contanmnation.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top