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At my wits end. Battery is new, I get 0.64v draining somewhere (measured between the terminal and post). I pulled the fuses, disconnected the ignition switch and the voltage regulator wires connectors; still around 0.6 volts draining. I’d sure appreciate any ideas on where to go next.
 

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Remove wire from alternator. If still the same, you might be reading the volt meter doing it's job. Take the ground off battery and put a test light between ground post and ground cable end. With key switch off there should be no light, turning the switch on the test light should come on as there will be a draw.
 

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You've made good start. You just haven't spent enough time at it. When I'm faced with a voltage draw I start at the alternator. The main output wire first, and if there is no change then the other wires one at at a time. Then maybe the fuses, but I start looking for circuits that are "hot all the time". Meaning connected to battery whether the engine is running or not when all switches are OFF. I find the alternator is usually the biggest culprit but not always. An old corroded flasher unit or light switch is also a likely candidate. I disconnect the easier to reach stuff first, then dig into the hard to reach places when all else fails. Don't forget to look behind the dash for a mouse nest or two. With "modern" tractors the computer(s) will always have a small draw due to memory circuits, but yours is old enough that this shouldn't be an issue.
 

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Remove wire from alternator. If still the same, you might be reading the volt meter doing it's job. Take the ground off battery and put a test light between ground post and ground cable end. With key switch off there should be no light, turning the switch on the test light should come on as there will be a draw.
So I get around 0.6v between the negative post and the ground with the alternator wire on. It drops to 0.45v with the alternator wire off. I need to pick up a test light but I get 13v with the key switch turned on. Also I get 0.12v between the alternator wire and post. I took the alternator to a shop yesterday and it tested fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited by Moderator)
You've made good start. You just haven't spent enough time at it. When I'm faced with a voltage draw I start at the alternator. The main output wire first, and if there is no change then the other wires one at at a time. Then maybe the fuses, but I start looking for circuits that are "hot all the time". Meaning connected to battery whether the engine is running or not when all switches are OFF. I find the alternator is usually the biggest culprit but not always. An old corroded flasher unit or light switch is also a likely candidate. I disconnect the easier to reach stuff first, then dig into the hard to reach places when all else fails. Don't forget to look behind the dash for a mouse nest or two. With "modern" tractors the computer(s) will always have a small draw due to memory circuits, but yours is old enough that this shouldn't be an issue.
Fedup I’m learning this as I go. 4 hours yesterday and 6 hours today and I wanna go deer hunting :). I think the hazard light is the only hot all the time circuit and no change with that fuse in or out. Wouldn’t I rule out light and hazard switches by pulling the fuses? I also got inside the dash, no mice. I disconnected the ignition switch and that wasn’t it either.
 

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Fuses are a mixed bag. You only need to be concerned with those that are "hot all the time". Even then I like to pull them one at a time while watching the volt meter. Any circuit where pulling a fuse makes a difference in the meter reading requires attention, even when it's not the only one. Most light circuits are fused AFTER the switch, so the switch is often "battery live", leading to possibility for internal corrosion to provide a path to ground, In some cases the flasher units had a battery live lead as well, although the switched circuits would be fused. I'm not sure what Kubota did in that regard.

My only thought is to keep disconnecting individual circuits while observing the meter until the reading drops to zero. Then start connecting circuits until you find one that shows a reading. Leave that one off and keep connecting those that leave the reading at zero. Once you have determined which are the affected circuits, you can make a decision on what to do next. If all that fails, I guess you can always disconnect a battery cable until you have more time to work on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
Fuses are a mixed bag. You only need to be concerned with those that are "hot all the time". Even then I like to pull them one at a time while watching the volt meter. Any circuit where pulling a fuse makes a difference in the meter reading requires attention, even when it's not the only one. Most light circuits are fused AFTER the switch, so the switch is often "battery live", leading to possibility for internal corrosion to provide a path to ground, In some cases the flasher units had a battery live lead as well, although the switched circuits would be fused. I'm not sure what Kubota did in that regard.

My only thought is to keep disconnecting individual circuits while observing the meter until the reading drops to zero. Then start connecting circuits until you find one that shows a reading. Leave that one off and keep connecting those that leave the reading at zero. Once you have determined which are the affected circuits, you can make a decision on what to do next. If all that fails, I guess you can always disconnect a battery cable until you have more time to work on it.
Think I’ll take a break and go hunting tomorrow w/cable off til I get some new ideas. Maybe that hazard switch. I’ll try to get a wiring diagram and see whether the switch is before the fuse. In any event I’ll report back with new developments. You guys are great, thank for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Use a test light, your meter will tell you nothing, you are just chasing phantom voltages.
Thanks for the wisdom easy rider. You were right. When pulled the fuse for the Panel Regulator, the light went out. Found a crappy schematic online but I can’t tell what the Panel Regulator does. Any ideas where to go from here?
 

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And, I pulled the connector off the voltage regulator and the light dimmed quite a bit but didn’t go out. Seems maybe I need to replace the voltage regulator.
 

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And, I pulled the connector off the voltage regulator and the light dimmed quite a bit but didn’t go out. Seems maybe I need to replace the voltage regulator.
So today I removed the voltage regulator and vacuumed the built up crap in the back where the soldered connections are. Put it back in and no more drain. Maybe some kind of shorting going on between the wires. I’ll leave the battery connected for a couple days and check it. Hopefully good to go for the snow storm coming this weekend. :)
 
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