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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All. I have just relocated the fuel pump of my CS2610 tractor from behind the engine to just forward of the LH rear wheel. This might seem a bit of a waste of time, but I have had some pump issues in recent times and it is hard to fault find something that you cannot get to easily, especially as the fault is intermittent. An after market supplier has quoted me between $140-$180 for an electric pump which I am not prepared to pay at the moment as it may be an electrical problem.

Replacing the pump has enabled me to correct some manufacturing issues around the location of the fuel lines and moving parts. I have also had to do this with some of the hydraulic lines - FEL & backhoe fitted/

I have no idea why Kioti put the pump is in a place where it takes me a couple of hours to get at ie. remove, the steering wheel, all the body work, floor, peddles, connectors etc. In the process of relocating the pump, I installing a new fuel line to the engine, changed the fuel filter, anddrained the fuel tank.

Got it all back together OK, but now I needed to prime the fuel lines etc. When I have done this previously on my old 1960's David Brown tractor, I just bleed the injector pump via the air bleed valve. The engine would them start almost as soon as it was cranked, though in some cases I cracked the joints to the injectors.

I was told by the serviceman who came out to fix something under warranty that the injector pump and fuel lines were primed 'automatically' without going through the above procedure. I have been through the manuals and on the WWW, but could not find anything explaining how this this occurs or how to do a 'conventional' bleed/prime of the fuel system.

Any explanation how to bleed the system would be much appreciated.

Jayne
 

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I suppose I can't be of much help, but the electric fuel pump should push the fuel into the lines as as the repair guy said, but I think you'd still need to follow the bleeding procedure in your manual.
 

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My guess is that when you turn the key to the first position, the lift pump is energized and supplies enough fuel pressure to fill the lines after a few cranks. If this is how it’s designed and without a bleeder, then in the event it won’t self prime, then you could crack the line just before the IP and turn the key on and wait for it to fill. This should give it enough fuel to ‘grab’. If the line doesn’t fill up within a few seconds then your lift pump isn’t coming on.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replys.
Unfortunately there is very little information in the Workshop manuals about the fuel system other that in the Trouble Shooting section where it says 'bleed the lines if air get into them' >> so the manual is not very helpful.

I had a closer look at the injector pump and there is a T connector (on its side) on the top of it - at what looks like the high point of the pump. The top outlet goes to the injector return line with the side connection being for the fuel in. I would think that with this arrangement any air in the fuel line should rise and flow back to the tank via the injector return line. Considering that the motor has not run since pulling it apart, I assume that the IP is still full of fuel. We will see once I sort out another problem - I have had a couple of earthing issues with this machine which may explain the intermittent operation of the fuel pump.
 
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