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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was given a tractor lately. Due to the injector and clutch problems, dealer is estimating $2400 in repairs not including the full service of fluids and filters, and then new tires all the way around. Unit has 2,000 hours on it. No rust. Is it worth fixing or should I part it out and buy something used that is newer albeit, more expensive. If so recommendations for good old tractor...two wheel drive is fine for us.
 

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Well, I'd price out the filters and oils, as well as the tires and labor, and I think you may end up with over 5 grand into it! Just a guess mind you, but it sure is food for thought when looking for another tractor.
I'd look for something similar and either part your free tractor out, or keep it for parts.
Welcome to the forum, btw!!
 

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What is wrong at having a go yourself, there is really nothing to replacing the clutch and that would be easy being a small tractor, there are a lot of blokes on this site that have replaced the clutch on their tractors, I am sure we could guide you along, all you need is hard standing, 2 wood wedges to jam either side of the front axle pivot to stop the engine from leaning sideways, enough flat wood to make a pigsty under the clutch area and a trolley jack so you can roll the rear section away from the flywheel housing, a clutch aligning tool when assembling the new clutch and pressure plate.

Is the clutch stuffed or is the adjustment not adjusted correctly ?.

Is the injection pump faulty or the injectors ?.

As for tyres, you could probably find some suitable second hand tyres to cut the initial costs.

Oil and filter changes should be a cinch to do, I wouldn't be paying out that amount of money if I thought I could have a go at the job myself, I can and do.
 

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Excellent suggestions. Never having worked on a tractor I was a little intimidated. However I have worked on cars to some degree bicycles and motorcycles. It could be the perfect learning opportunity. I have the space at home and the tools. The cost of a shop manual is a whole lot cheaper than the $100 an hour Kubota wants to charge me. Any other suggestions?
 

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Well, if you are handy and do go ahead and get the service/repair manual, I'd see if I could sort the engine first, before I got into the rest of the tractor.
I agree, I mean't to mention that in my rant, pump guy is on board and he is a great help and a wealth of knowledge on pumps and injectors, if the engine rotates, then that is a plus for starters, if you already haven't done this, you can remove the starter motor and using a heavy flat blade screwdriver or tyre lever, place end into the ring gear teeth and gently lever against the engine casting, if the engine is not locked up, it should turn with a little bit of effort and that is the beginning of the journey Richard.

Sometimes you can google the tractor model and brand, and sometimes you can get free info pertaining to the tractor, I will do a search a little later and see what is on the web.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What is wrong at having a go yourself, there is really nothing to replacing the clutch and that would be easy being a small tractor, there are a lot of blokes on this site that have replaced the clutch on their tractors, I am sure we could guide you along, all you need is hard standing, 2 wood wedges to jam either side of the front axle pivot to stop the engine from leaning sideways, enough flat wood to make a pigsty under the clutch area and a trolley jack so you can roll the rear section away from the flywheel housing, a clutch aligning tool when assembling the new clutch and pressure plate.

Is the clutch stuffed or is the adjustment not adjusted correctly ?.

Is the injection pump faulty or the injectors ?.

As for tyres, you could probably find some suitable second hand tyres to cut the initial costs.

Oil and filter changes should be a cinch to do, I wouldn't be paying out that amount of money if I thought I could have a go at the job myself, I can and do.
 

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Sounds like you have enough mechanical background to do most repairs yourself.
If the tires hold air then just run them. It isn't like you will be driving at 50 mph.
Buy a full service manual not just an owners manual. I never work on a tractor before but I did a total out of frame engine rebuild on it.
Why is dealer saying it needs injectors or pump work? It doesn't run or what?
Definitely do the oil and filter changes yourself because the dealer will probably empty your wallet. I did that once and never again. $300 to change engine and hydraulic oils. I even supplied the filters I had bought from another dealer. I asked why so much and he said the oil fluids re expensive.
Cripe it Cost $300 to do a PM and that is about 50 qts of oil at a Mack truck dealer I worked at.
If you have a concrete floor to work on then you got a plus for splitting the tractor to replace the clutch.
 

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I had another look at your photo, I would pigsty under the front weights before splitting, that amount of weight may cause the front to drop when you split the tractor and that then would cause problems or even some danger.
 
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