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Discussion Starter #1
Ok here at the intersection of the coastal plain and the piedmont regions of North Carolina, we have some unique situations. First of all, it's impossible to grow a nice lawn as we get too cold in winter for warm season grasses leaving them susceptible to disease. Too hot in summer for cool season grasses so lots of watering is required, leaving them susceptible to diseases. So either way you go, its expensive and you have to continually reseed and work hard to nurture. Now my problem. We recently had a week of temperatures in the 10f - 20f range and then a day and night in the 1f -10f range. The hydraulics on my 1968 Ford 2000 worked fine to clear 5" of snow off driveway but the next day (1f) the hydraulics froze. It took 2 days in the 50f - 60f range to thaw and work normally. I know the fluid had loaded up with condensation again after changing it in August. I've now purchased new filters and will change it again in the coming week. (I expect the filters now in it haven't been changed since new and probably the oil hadn't been changed until I did it in August). Realizing that those extreme cold temperatures for a week are a rarity, I'm wondering if the wet fluid froze in the sump or in the lines to the pump. Any opinions? In the somewhat unlikely event this happens again, I'd like to have a chance at knowing where the problem is/was.
 

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I'm sure it did, but not enough to cause damage if that's your concern. I get cavitation all the time here in Idaho because we get down below zero all the time one week, then next week it comes above freezing, to the unusual circumstance like yesterday, where it was almost 50 degrees!!! In January!!!!! You might think about moving to a place like Florida where you could grow a lawn.............. (I fun you now) but have you thought about putting up a building large enough for just the tractor and some much needed heat?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks tractor beam. Yes our week or so of 1-20 f weather was followed by a warm week and on Friday afternoon was 70f. The cold is so rare here. Would like a building, but just not going to be possible as I've got 200 feet of this fence to finish in the next 2 years. I doubt we will have that low temperature again this year. Just planning a course of action in the off chance it does and we have snow. I'd like to do some neighbor's driveways. Never had this problem with the 9N as the pump was in the sump! I have an idea that if the problem is in the sump running the pto might warm things up?
 

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Unless there's air ,or water in the system,you shouldn't get any freezing.
Check the filler cap,for the hydro tank,and the fittings,to make sure.
Also,any vents should have a length of hose,with a small filter,on it.
That's the only way we kept the hydros from freezing,in the military.
It acts like the vent line,on a differential of a truck.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you jhngardner367. Yes underlying problem is moisture in the system. Even though I changed out the fluid in August, that didn't take all the moisture with it. I have purchased new inlet filter and pipe, new outlet filter and seals for it, have new side access and top plate gaskets on order as well as the gasket that is spotta be on the filler plug. I'm not aware of any venting on either the hydraulic sump or for that matter, the transmission of a Ford 2000. When I bought this last March, I had the wrong impression of how it had been treated for the last 49 years. Now evidence says that for long periods of time, owner's assumed that if it worked, it was ok to go. No periodic maintenance for a majority of it's life. When all parts are in hand, my new bff (mechanic) will be changing the filters out as well as washing out the sump and putting in new fluid.
 

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Unless there's air ,or water in the system,you shouldn't get any freezing.
Check the filler cap,for the hydro tank,and the fittings,to make sure.
Also,any vents should have a length of hose,with a small filter,on it.
That's the only way we kept the hydros from freezing,in the military.
It acts like the vent line,on a differential of a truck.
Hello

Same here in NY 3400 Ford Industrial pto 3 pt hitch froze....wont lift...any help?
 

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Thank you jhngardner367. Yes underlying problem is moisture in the system. Even though I changed out the fluid in August, that didn't take all the moisture with it. I have purchased new inlet filter and pipe, new outlet filter and seals for it, have new side access and top plate gaskets on order as well as the gasket that is spotta be on the filler plug. I'm not aware of any venting on either the hydraulic sump or for that matter, the transmission of a Ford 2000. When I bought this last March, I had the wrong impression of how it had been treated for the last 49 years. Now evidence says that for long periods of time, owner's assumed that if it worked, it was ok to go. No periodic maintenance for a majority of it's life. When all parts are in hand, my new bff (mechanic) will be changing the filters out as well as washing out the sump and putting in new fluid.
Yep,that'll do it!
When I first got my 1969 Bolens, I checked the trans,....it looked like grey pudding !
Found out,it hadn't been run,in seven years,and it sat where there were always piles of snow,in the winter !
Repacked all bearings,drained,and flushed the trans,and she's good.
 
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Hello clydesdalerider, here is what I've taken aboard in dealing with this. The only short term solution is to put the tractor somewhere that there's enough heat to melt the ice that's formed in the sump or in the lines between the sump and the flywheel mounted pump. This will only be a short term solution allowing you to use the tractor today. The long term solution is getting the moisture out of the hydraulic system and making sure your inlet and outlet filters are in good shape, and that's likely to take more than 1 fluid change. For me, changing the filters is a job for my bff (a good mechanic) because I'm ignorant regarding what happens in the hydraulic mechanicals. Part of that process has to be dropping the fluid, so I'll have him do that also....there's a drying out process I've read about. IDK if my mechanic will think it's a good idea or not....empty the fluid, refill with 4 gals of kerosene plus a quart of ATF and a pint or more of rubbing alcohol. Slosh this around by driving tractor around rough ground (do not run hydraulics) and then dump and refill with good fluid. I'm going to discus this with my mechanic and go with his opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
I think the suction strainer is clogged with ice or old jelled oil
Yes that (inlet filter and pipe) is a possible trouble point. For my tractor that part which was supposed to last "forever" may have succumbed to the conditions you noted. Gonna be in much better shape after my mechanic puts it all back together with moisture out and new inlet and outlet filters. That's not a place for inexperienced fingers like mine, and not to be done casually. So he'll be looking for anything else that's problematic while in there.
 
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