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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if it is possible to cause permandant damage to a hydro tranny? Since I will be plowing snow for the first time ever this winter I just want to make sure that if I accidently over do it that I will not cause any serious damage to my tractor? Also what are some of the signs that I am overdoing it and I need to lighten up the load? Also, will the normal whine change into another sound? Thanks in advance for sharing all you insight and knowledge.

Adam
 

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Well, I don;t know a ton about hydros, but ya it can be damanged.


Now will it be with plowing? I think as long as you are not using to small of a tractor, not plowing tomuch snow, and just use common sence you will be fine. I think you will know when you hit it's limits.

Are you using the JD? If so, the LX's are a pretty HD lawn tractor right? If so, wile probably not as strong as a GT, I wold think plowing would not be a problem
 

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You really don't need to worry much. Hydros are very resiliant to abuse and the back and forth won't hurt it at all. Like anything, use common sense and make sure that you aren't trying to do something that could bend or break the plow, axle, frame, etc.
 

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I've plowed snow with an old Deere 316 I bought new in 1979 and still use and I've driven full speed into 3 foot high snow banks that the road crew thoughtfully left for me. I busted the steering wheel with my belly once from the sudden stop, stalled the motor from the deceleration a few times, spun the chains right off the tires and caused the tractor to spin 180 degrees while pivoting around ablock of ice and I haven't hurt the hydro at all. I have bruised myself up some over the years. Now my experience is with a heavily built garden tractor. I don't know what model you have, but if it is a L, LT or LX, you are gonna probably spin the tires before you strain the hydro, because of their light weight. The Deere garden tractors are heavier built but have heavier hydros so still little to worry about. Common sense as to speed and impact into snow banks will prevent any damage, and as stated above, the back and forth motion of plowing in and of it self is no problem. Just be mindful of the sudden impact induced stops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have an LX and I am in St. Louis so anything over 6" is alot for us, so I am pretty confident that it will work pretty well.

Adam
 

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An LX for 6" sounds like a plan for success to me. Enjoy it and smile while you are plowing at how many shovels full of snow you are moving while comfortably sitting down.:thumbsup:
 

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Adam,
I live a few miles south of you, down near the Farmington area, and, you're right, 6" is usually a lot for this area. Except for last Christmas eve when we got about 8-9 inches on the 23rd and another 4-6 on Christmas eve. I think the LX can more than handle the the snow plowing chores for this area.
 
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