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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Main Parts List
  • Hydraulic Pump Drive Coupler, 708639M91, $70
  • Pump Drive Shaft Assembly, 707166M92, $135
  • 19 GPM SAE-B 13 spline counter-clockwise rotation Hydraulic Pump, HGP AL13S-B02-220L, $172
  • Hydraulic Filter Assembly, 1042326M1, $34
  • Various hydraulic fittings, adapters, and hoses
We recently acquired a 1966 Massey Ferguson 165 tractor for our timber farm. Soon after, we added a MF 236 loader and plumbed it into the auxiliaries. It was immediately apparent that the non-MultiPower 4.4 gpm 3-point lift pump was just too slow to make it useful and manually switching between loader and 3-point use was cumbersome and would cause the implement to drop.

The loader is set up from the factory to be used with an independent hydraulic pump. There is a 5-ish gallon hydraulic tank in the right frame support and original equipment included a dedicated front mounted hydraulic pump that ran off of the engine crank pulley. Information on how to add this to an MF 165 was spotty online so, after much trial and error, here's how I did it.

The Perkins diesel in the 165 has a crank pulley with four evenly spaced drilled and tapped ⅜-16 holes. I imagine the other engine options have the same mounting holes as none of the parts manuals showed different crank adapters for different engines. A circular coupler (p/n: 708639M91) attaches to these four holes using rubber bushing inserts and has a left hand threaded hole in the center for a shaft. I bought mine new, including the bushings, for $70 here: (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hydraulic-...6?pageci=eb2fc3e3-3dc9-46dc-b1ee-c9d93e2a0bb5 ). Four ⅜-16 x 1 ¼" bolts and lock washers mount it to the crank pulley. (see note at end)
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A shaft a little over a foot long (p/n: 707166M92) threads counter clockwise into the crank coupler and extends through a tunnel in the front axle to the pump mount flange. The pump end has 13 recessed splines, one of the SAE B standard options. I got mine for $112+$23 shipping from Yesterday's Tractors (https://www.yesterdaystractors.com/...-Pump-Drive-Shaft-with-Coupler_707166M92.html)

The front of the tractor, behind the front bumper, has a standard SAE B hydraulic pump mount cut into it with drilled and tapped holes. This was the most elusive detail for me and I was thrilled to discover that no special bracketry or pump mounts, which almost certainly wouldn't be available new, were required. The front bumper has to be permanently removed to mount the front pump in its place. The original pump part number seems to be p/n: 1048096M91 and puts out 17 gpm but any standard SAE B 2-bolt pump will mount to it. Since the original pump isn’t available online and someone a while back said the dealer wanted over $750 for one, I opted for a generic replacement from eBay for $172 (p/n: HGP AL13S-B02-220L). Putting out 19 gpm @ 2k rpm I figured it would closely match the performance of the original pump. Since the crank turns clockwise and the pump would be facing rearward, the pump has to rotate counter-clockwise. Here's the one I bought (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hydraulic-...0?pageci=2e32dd64-1455-405e-855f-8c9f6360926b). I secured the pump with two ½-13 x 1 ½" bolts, flat washers & lock washers. The parts manual specified 2" long bolts but either the holes on my tractor weren't tapped as deeply as they should have been or the flange on the original pump was much thicker because the 2” bolts I tried first bottomed out too early.
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The shaft of this pump is ¾" shorter than the depth of the splines in the coupler shaft once everything was installed. This became a problem as it allowed the coupler disc to slide forward and fall off of the stepped rubber bushings holding it to the crank pulley. Because the coupler couldn't slide far enough forward to clear the bolt heads it stayed attached and just rattled and vibrated like crazy. I, eventually, solved the problem by packing 11/16" worth of ¾" O.D.rubber washers (with a few steel ones in the middle) in the coupler shaft's splined recess to take up most of the empty space but allow for expansion, crankshaft thrust, etc. After that everything stayed where it was supposed to be. The ¾" outer diameter washers I used were from McMaster-Carr (https://www.mcmaster.com/#90131A102).
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The suction line attaches to the bottom of the built-in tank on the right hand side of the loader frame. All tank connections were ¾" NPT. I used a male-female right angle to make the bend easier. An 80”, 1" hose is specified but I bought 10’ of hose and ended up cutting mine down to closer to 100” and attaching the ¾" NPT barbed fittings with hose clamps.

The manual shows a filter on the suction line between the tank and the pump inlet (p/n: 1042326M1). At the time I couldn’t find one in stock though now it looks like Madison Tractor Co might have one here: (https://www.madisontractor.com/1042326m1-hydraulic-filter-assembly-in-line.html). If I did this over again, I’d buy the original filter & filter head from them. Instead I picked up a standard hydraulic filter head along with a NAPA 1797 hydraulic oil filter (biggest one they stocked). I installed them at the pump inlet as shown in the parts manual. While running I measured 21" of vacuum between the filter and pump inlet. Since most sources recommend 5" of vacuum max at the pump inlet I moved the filter to the return line to the tank. Maybe the original filter would have resulted in less vacuum, it is rated for 25 microns rather than 10 microns on the NAPA filter. The pump inlet is an SAE size 16 O-ring sealed connection and I adapted that to ¾" NPT.

My tank had been unused and open to the elements, dirt, grass clippings, etc for long enough that I didn't feel comfortable having no filtration between the tank and the pump. I ended up installing a 1" wye strainer from a plumbing supply store on the pump inlet and am very glad I did. This is a high flow inline strainer with a removable mesh screen. In the first twenty hours of operation I emptied rust, grass clippings, etc from this strainer three times and I'm convinced it saved the pump. I put a ¾" ball valve before the strainer so I could empty it or disconnect the hose without the whole hydraulic tank draining onto the floor.
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The outlet of the pump is an SAE size 12 O-ring sealed connector. I adapted this to ¾" NPT so I could use a ¾" body high-flow quick connect coupler (TEMco HF0075). I bought mine here for $30 (https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07KLPY9GS?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title).
A ½" 10'-ish high pressure hose connects the pump outlet, using the quick connect above, to the loader valve assembly.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive wheel system Gas Bumper
Automotive tire Grey Road surface Automotive wheel system Rim

An 18" long ¾" return hose connects the return side of the loader valves to the filter head which I plumbed straight into the tank.

I used a ¾" right angle to attach a standard hydraulic breather to the top port of the tank as specified in the parts manual. This breather is unscrewed to fill the tank. There is no dipstick, rather on the left side of the tank is a small, easy to miss square headed plug. Remove the plug and fill the tank until fluid runs out of that hole. You'll know if you forget to remove the plug before filling it because air bubbles flowing back up the fill port will cause fluid to drip everywhere.

I have put about 25 hours on this new setup and love it. The 3 point hitch and loader are both full time now and the loader runs at a usable speed; I wouldn't want it to be any faster.

It looks like most 100 and 200 series Masseys can support the front mounted pump but they will require different coupler discs and coupler shafts/setups. The 135 for example has a three hole disc rather than the four hole used here. From the parts book it looks like not all have the SAE B connection milled into the front axle and will require spacers or mounting brackets. If you're looking to make this conversation, I strongly recommend ordering an MF 236 loader parts book as the illustrations alone are worth it. I got mine for $18 here (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Massey-Fer...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649).
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
A couple of notes on the install:
  1. My first attempt at preventing the crank coupler from sliding forward off of the rubber bushings was to use longer bolts with wide rubber washers to hold the coupler to the crank pulley while still allowing for flex. This was a massive disaster as when I rotated the engine with the starter, two of the longer bolt heads caught the casting in front of the engine, broke, bent, and jammed. It took me 8 hours to disassemble the front of the tractor, remove the intact bolts, cut through the remaining one, and extract it from the pulley with an easy-out. The rubber washers in the spline recess worked perfectly and was a good deal cheaper.
  2. Because the hydraulic tank is built-in to the loader, if I want to remove the loader and run the engine I'll need to remove the pump as well or it would be running dry. Because the pump holds the coupler on the rubber cushions now bolted to the crank pulley, if I remove the pump I'll have to remove the coupler shaft and coupler disc as well. This is a labor intensive process and as such the loader is now not easily removable. If I had a tiny hydraulic tank that I could plumb into the pump when I remove the loader then removing the loader would be a lot easier.
  3. At first I tried to use a quick-connect coupler for the suction line as well, trying to preserve the loader's quick attach character. However, I eventually realized that standard quick connect couplers are only rated for pressure connections and not suction/vacuum. My loader would work fine when I first started it but after a few minutes of operation it would be almost completely unresponsive. The suction line quick connect coupler was allowing air to be sucked in past its seals and causing the fluid to foam. Eliminating the quick connect immediately solved the problem. I replaced it with the ball valve I mentioned earlier so that if I shut the valve I can disconnect the suction hose from the pump without the tank draining out through it.
  4. The tank has a ½" NPT drain plug in the bottom. If your tank was never used that port is likely plugged with a plastic shipping plug and not an actual steel threaded plug. The plastic shipping plug will need to be replaced with a flush allen head ½" NPT plug. The pipe threads on mine were badly rusted and I had to cut them deeper with a pipe tap to get the plug to seal, even with 4 or 5 wraps in yellow, gas rated Teflon tape.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks folks! I often find that getting the right information is the hardest part of keeping older tractors alive and working. I've benefited from posts on this forum so many times that when I had a few things I'd figured out I was glad to contribute. And I even remembered to take pictures along the way!
 

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Most excellent post! Thank you so much. I operate a MF231 w/a MF232 Loader.
I have not removed my loader yet-always something else to do. I will refer to
your post when I go to remove/install the loader. Keep up the good work!!
 

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Main Parts List
  • Hydraulic Pump Drive Coupler, 708639M91, $70
  • Pump Drive Shaft Assembly, 707166M92, $135
  • 19 GPM SAE-B 13 spline counter-clockwise rotation Hydraulic Pump, HGP AL13S-B02-220L, $172
  • Hydraulic Filter Assembly, 1042326M1, $34
  • Various hydraulic fittings, adapters, and hoses
We recently acquired a 1966 Massey Ferguson 165 tractor for our timber farm. Soon after, we added a MF 236 loader and plumbed it into the auxiliaries. It was immediately apparent that the non-MultiPower 4.4 gpm 3-point lift pump was just too slow to make it useful and manually switching between loader and 3-point use was cumbersome and would cause the implement to drop.

The loader is set up from the factory to be used with an independent hydraulic pump. There is a 5-ish gallon hydraulic tank in the right frame support and original equipment included a dedicated front mounted hydraulic pump that ran off of the engine crank pulley. Information on how to add this to an MF 165 was spotty online so, after much trial and error, here's how I did it.

The Perkins diesel in the 165 has a crank pulley with four evenly spaced drilled and tapped ⅜-16 holes. I imagine the other engine options have the same mounting holes as none of the parts manuals showed different crank adapters for different engines. A circular coupler (p/n: 708639M91) attaches to these four holes using rubber bushing inserts and has a left hand threaded hole in the center for a shaft. I bought mine new, including the bushings, for $70 here: (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hydraulic-...6?pageci=eb2fc3e3-3dc9-46dc-b1ee-c9d93e2a0bb5 ). Four ⅜-16 x 1 ¼" bolts and lock washers mount it to the crank pulley. (see note at end)
View attachment 63321 View attachment 63323 View attachment 63325
A shaft a little over a foot long (p/n: 707166M92) threads counter clockwise into the crank coupler and extends through a tunnel in the front axle to the pump mount flange. The pump end has 13 recessed splines, one of the SAE B standard options. I got mine for $112+$23 shipping from Yesterday's Tractors (Massey Ferguson 165 Hydraulic Pump Drive Shaft with Coupler - 707166M92)

The front of the tractor, behind the front bumper, has a standard SAE B hydraulic pump mount cut into it with drilled and tapped holes. This was the most elusive detail for me and I was thrilled to discover that no special bracketry or pump mounts, which almost certainly wouldn't be available new, were required. The front bumper has to be permanently removed to mount the front pump in its place. The original pump part number seems to be p/n: 1048096M91 and puts out 17 gpm but any standard SAE B 2-bolt pump will mount to it. Since the original pump isn’t available online and someone a while back said the dealer wanted over $750 for one, I opted for a generic replacement from eBay for $172 (p/n: HGP AL13S-B02-220L). Putting out 19 gpm @ 2k rpm I figured it would closely match the performance of the original pump. Since the crank turns clockwise and the pump would be facing rearward, the pump has to rotate counter-clockwise. Here's the one I bought (Hydraulic Gear Pump 13 Tooth Spline Shaft CID 0.97 - 2.74 SAE B-2 bolts GPM 3-29 | eBay). I secured the pump with two ½-13 x 1 ½" bolts, flat washers & lock washers. The parts manual specified 2" long bolts but either the holes on my tractor weren't tapped as deeply as they should have been or the flange on the original pump was much thicker because the 2” bolts I tried first bottomed out too early.
View attachment 63327 View attachment 63331

The shaft of this pump is ¾" shorter than the depth of the splines in the coupler shaft once everything was installed. This became a problem as it allowed the coupler disc to slide forward and fall off of the stepped rubber bushings holding it to the crank pulley. Because the coupler couldn't slide far enough forward to clear the bolt heads it stayed attached and just rattled and vibrated like crazy. I, eventually, solved the problem by packing 11/16" worth of ¾" O.D.rubber washers (with a few steel ones in the middle) in the coupler shaft's splined recess to take up most of the empty space but allow for expansion, crankshaft thrust, etc. After that everything stayed where it was supposed to be. The ¾" outer diameter washers I used were from McMaster-Carr (McMaster-Carr).
View attachment 63333 View attachment 63335
The suction line attaches to the bottom of the built-in tank on the right hand side of the loader frame. All tank connections were ¾" NPT. I used a male-female right angle to make the bend easier. An 80”, 1" hose is specified but I bought 10’ of hose and ended up cutting mine down to closer to 100” and attaching the ¾" NPT barbed fittings with hose clamps.

The manual shows a filter on the suction line between the tank and the pump inlet (p/n: 1042326M1). At the time I couldn’t find one in stock though now it looks like Madison Tractor Co might have one here: (1042326M1 - Hydraulic Filter Assembly In Line). If I did this over again, I’d buy the original filter & filter head from them. Instead I picked up a standard hydraulic filter head along with a NAPA 1797 hydraulic oil filter (biggest one they stocked). I installed them at the pump inlet as shown in the parts manual. While running I measured 21" of vacuum between the filter and pump inlet. Since most sources recommend 5" of vacuum max at the pump inlet I moved the filter to the return line to the tank. Maybe the original filter would have resulted in less vacuum, it is rated for 25 microns rather than 10 microns on the NAPA filter. The pump inlet is an SAE size 16 O-ring sealed connection and I adapted that to ¾" NPT.

My tank had been unused and open to the elements, dirt, grass clippings, etc for long enough that I didn't feel comfortable having no filtration between the tank and the pump. I ended up installing a 1" wye strainer from a plumbing supply store on the pump inlet and am very glad I did. This is a high flow inline strainer with a removable mesh screen. In the first twenty hours of operation I emptied rust, grass clippings, etc from this strainer three times and I'm convinced it saved the pump. I put a ¾" ball valve before the strainer so I could empty it or disconnect the hose without the whole hydraulic tank draining onto the floor.
View attachment 63341 View attachment 63343

The outlet of the pump is an SAE size 12 O-ring sealed connector. I adapted this to ¾" NPT so I could use a ¾" body high-flow quick connect coupler (TEMco HF0075). I bought mine here for $30 (TEMCo 3/4" Female NPT Thread 3/4" Body Pair Hydraulic Coupler ISO 7241B Poppet Valve Quick Connect for Tractors and Ag Equipment Fits Pioneer Parker Format - HF0075 (HF0073 + HF0074): Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific).
A ½" 10'-ish high pressure hose connects the pump outlet, using the quick connect above, to the loader valve assembly.
View attachment 63327 View attachment 63335
An 18" long ¾" return hose connects the return side of the loader valves to the filter head which I plumbed straight into the tank.

I used a ¾" right angle to attach a standard hydraulic breather to the top port of the tank as specified in the parts manual. This breather is unscrewed to fill the tank. There is no dipstick, rather on the left side of the tank is a small, easy to miss square headed plug. Remove the plug and fill the tank until fluid runs out of that hole. You'll know if you forget to remove the plug before filling it because air bubbles flowing back up the fill port will cause fluid to drip everywhere.

I have put about 25 hours on this new setup and love it. The 3 point hitch and loader are both full time now and the loader runs at a usable speed; I wouldn't want it to be any faster.

It looks like most 100 and 200 series Masseys can support the front mounted pump but they will require different coupler discs and coupler shafts/setups. The 135 for example has a three hole disc rather than the four hole used here. From the parts book it looks like not all have the SAE B connection milled into the front axle and will require spacers or mounting brackets. If you're looking to make this conversation, I strongly recommend ordering an MF 236 loader parts book as the illustrations alone are worth it. I got mine for $18 here (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Massey-Ferguson-MF-236-Loader-Parts-Manual/143392621868?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649).
I know this an older post but thanks for the details. Do you think this pump
Main Parts List
  • Hydraulic Pump Drive Coupler, 708639M91, $70
  • Pump Drive Shaft Assembly, 707166M92, $135
  • 19 GPM SAE-B 13 spline counter-clockwise rotation Hydraulic Pump, HGP AL13S-B02-220L, $172
  • Hydraulic Filter Assembly, 1042326M1, $34
  • Various hydraulic fittings, adapters, and hoses
We recently acquired a 1966 Massey Ferguson 165 tractor for our timber farm. Soon after, we added a MF 236 loader and plumbed it into the auxiliaries. It was immediately apparent that the non-MultiPower 4.4 gpm 3-point lift pump was just too slow to make it useful and manually switching between loader and 3-point use was cumbersome and would cause the implement to drop.

The loader is set up from the factory to be used with an independent hydraulic pump. There is a 5-ish gallon hydraulic tank in the right frame support and original equipment included a dedicated front mounted hydraulic pump that ran off of the engine crank pulley. Information on how to add this to an MF 165 was spotty online so, after much trial and error, here's how I did it.

The Perkins diesel in the 165 has a crank pulley with four evenly spaced drilled and tapped ⅜-16 holes. I imagine the other engine options have the same mounting holes as none of the parts manuals showed different crank adapters for different engines. A circular coupler (p/n: 708639M91) attaches to these four holes using rubber bushing inserts and has a left hand threaded hole in the center for a shaft. I bought mine new, including the bushings, for $70 here: (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Hydraulic-...6?pageci=eb2fc3e3-3dc9-46dc-b1ee-c9d93e2a0bb5 ). Four ⅜-16 x 1 ¼" bolts and lock washers mount it to the crank pulley. (see note at end)
View attachment 63321 View attachment 63323 View attachment 63325
A shaft a little over a foot long (p/n: 707166M92) threads counter clockwise into the crank coupler and extends through a tunnel in the front axle to the pump mount flange. The pump end has 13 recessed splines, one of the SAE B standard options. I got mine for $112+$23 shipping from Yesterday's Tractors (Massey Ferguson 165 Hydraulic Pump Drive Shaft with Coupler - 707166M92)

The front of the tractor, behind the front bumper, has a standard SAE B hydraulic pump mount cut into it with drilled and tapped holes. This was the most elusive detail for me and I was thrilled to discover that no special bracketry or pump mounts, which almost certainly wouldn't be available new, were required. The front bumper has to be permanently removed to mount the front pump in its place. The original pump part number seems to be p/n: 1048096M91 and puts out 17 gpm but any standard SAE B 2-bolt pump will mount to it. Since the original pump isn’t available online and someone a while back said the dealer wanted over $750 for one, I opted for a generic replacement from eBay for $172 (p/n: HGP AL13S-B02-220L). Putting out 19 gpm @ 2k rpm I figured it would closely match the performance of the original pump. Since the crank turns clockwise and the pump would be facing rearward, the pump has to rotate counter-clockwise. Here's the one I bought (Hydraulic Gear Pump 13 Tooth Spline Shaft CID 0.97 - 2.74 SAE B-2 bolts GPM 3-29 | eBay). I secured the pump with two ½-13 x 1 ½" bolts, flat washers & lock washers. The parts manual specified 2" long bolts but either the holes on my tractor weren't tapped as deeply as they should have been or the flange on the original pump was much thicker because the 2” bolts I tried first bottomed out too early.
View attachment 63327 View attachment 63331

The shaft of this pump is ¾" shorter than the depth of the splines in the coupler shaft once everything was installed. This became a problem as it allowed the coupler disc to slide forward and fall off of the stepped rubber bushings holding it to the crank pulley. Because the coupler couldn't slide far enough forward to clear the bolt heads it stayed attached and just rattled and vibrated like crazy. I, eventually, solved the problem by packing 11/16" worth of ¾" O.D.rubber washers (with a few steel ones in the middle) in the coupler shaft's splined recess to take up most of the empty space but allow for expansion, crankshaft thrust, etc. After that everything stayed where it was supposed to be. The ¾" outer diameter washers I used were from McMaster-Carr (McMaster-Carr).
View attachment 63333 View attachment 63335
The suction line attaches to the bottom of the built-in tank on the right hand side of the loader frame. All tank connections were ¾" NPT. I used a male-female right angle to make the bend easier. An 80”, 1" hose is specified but I bought 10’ of hose and ended up cutting mine down to closer to 100” and attaching the ¾" NPT barbed fittings with hose clamps.

The manual shows a filter on the suction line between the tank and the pump inlet (p/n: 1042326M1). At the time I couldn’t find one in stock though now it looks like Madison Tractor Co might have one here: (1042326M1 - Hydraulic Filter Assembly In Line). If I did this over again, I’d buy the original filter & filter head from them. Instead I picked up a standard hydraulic filter head along with a NAPA 1797 hydraulic oil filter (biggest one they stocked). I installed them at the pump inlet as shown in the parts manual. While running I measured 21" of vacuum between the filter and pump inlet. Since most sources recommend 5" of vacuum max at the pump inlet I moved the filter to the return line to the tank. Maybe the original filter would have resulted in less vacuum, it is rated for 25 microns rather than 10 microns on the NAPA filter. The pump inlet is an SAE size 16 O-ring sealed connection and I adapted that to ¾" NPT.

My tank had been unused and open to the elements, dirt, grass clippings, etc for long enough that I didn't feel comfortable having no filtration between the tank and the pump. I ended up installing a 1" wye strainer from a plumbing supply store on the pump inlet and am very glad I did. This is a high flow inline strainer with a removable mesh screen. In the first twenty hours of operation I emptied rust, grass clippings, etc from this strainer three times and I'm convinced it saved the pump. I put a ¾" ball valve before the strainer so I could empty it or disconnect the hose without the whole hydraulic tank draining onto the floor.
View attachment 63341 View attachment 63343

The outlet of the pump is an SAE size 12 O-ring sealed connector. I adapted this to ¾" NPT so I could use a ¾" body high-flow quick connect coupler (TEMco HF0075). I bought mine here for $30 (TEMCo 3/4" Female NPT Thread 3/4" Body Pair Hydraulic Coupler ISO 7241B Poppet Valve Quick Connect for Tractors and Ag Equipment Fits Pioneer Parker Format - HF0075 (HF0073 + HF0074): Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific).
A ½" 10'-ish high pressure hose connects the pump outlet, using the quick connect above, to the loader valve assembly.
View attachment 63327 View attachment 63335
An 18" long ¾" return hose connects the return side of the loader valves to the filter head which I plumbed straight into the tank.

I used a ¾" right angle to attach a standard hydraulic breather to the top port of the tank as specified in the parts manual. This breather is unscrewed to fill the tank. There is no dipstick, rather on the left side of the tank is a small, easy to miss square headed plug. Remove the plug and fill the tank until fluid runs out of that hole. You'll know if you forget to remove the plug before filling it because air bubbles flowing back up the fill port will cause fluid to drip everywhere.

I have put about 25 hours on this new setup and love it. The 3 point hitch and loader are both full time now and the loader runs at a usable speed; I wouldn't want it to be any faster.

It looks like most 100 and 200 series Masseys can support the front mounted pump but they will require different coupler discs and coupler shafts/setups. The 135 for example has a three hole disc rather than the four hole used here. From the parts book it looks like not all have the SAE B connection milled into the front axle and will require spacers or mounting brackets. If you're looking to make this conversation, I strongly recommend ordering an MF 236 loader parts book as the illustrations alone are worth it. I got mine for $18 here (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Massey-Ferguson-MF-236-Loader-Parts-Manual/143392621868?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649).
Hi. Thanks for the great post. I'm looking to purchase a used backhoe attachment for my international 350 utility tractor that currently has a front end loader. I know the original stock pump won't support both the loader and the backhoe. Do you think the aftermarket front pump you used would work? Any recommendations?? Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know this an older post but thanks for the details. Do you think this pump

Hi. Thanks for the great post. I'm looking to purchase a used backhoe attachment for my international 350 utility tractor that currently has a front end loader. I know the original stock pump won't support both the loader and the backhoe. Do you think the aftermarket front pump you used would work? Any recommendations?? Thanks again.
Hi Paul! Thanks, glad you liked the post.

From what I can find, an IH 350 tractor has a 2.5 gpm stock internal hydraulic pump. If that is the one you have then I agree, that definitely doesn't seem like enough to run a backhoe without falling asleep between bucket fulls.

It looks like these tractors can support a front mounted stinger pump like in mine above. Pictures 10 & 11 here show some closeups of that setup on your tractor that someone is using to run a backhoe. It looks like the same type of SAE mount that my MF had but I can't say for sure. If so, and you can figure out how to get power to it from the engine, then yeah i would definitely recommend the pump I used. We have put about 100 hrs on it now with now issues. If you already have a front mounted pump for your loader, then I'd try using it with the backhoe to see how it performs before you replace it, after all you won't be running the backhoe and the loader at the same time.

Another option might be to run a PTO mounted hydraulic pump. I have a Kubota B8200 with the rear mounted BL4520 backhoe. That has a hydraulic pump mounted on the PTO shaft and it works great. You can use chains, or bar stock mounted to rubber bumpers to keep the pump from spinning when you engage the PTO. I'd have gone with a PTO mounted pump for my loader if I didn't also need to run a bush hog at the same time.
 
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