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I just put another 256 meg of memory in my machine this evening. This is only the second time I’ve cracked open the case in two years. What a mess! Dust in every critical area of the machine. The CPU heat sink was 50% clogged with dust bunnies – an overheating in the making! The fans & air intake / outlets were semi clogged / covered with dust.

We take such good care of our tractors, but overlook our “other” workhorse – the computer. If you haven’t done so lately, do yourself a favor & crack open your computer case and take a look – chances are you’ll find what I did – trouble in the making!

Jay
 

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I took mine outside and used the air hose on it a couple of months ago. Just have to keep the pressure down low so as not to dislodge anything. Like your's, the CPU fan was about 50% coated and it's probably the most critical one to keep clean.

Mark
 

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Yep. Dust can lead to premature failure and overheating of critical parts of the PC. You would be amazed at the filth I have seen some computers in and still functioning just fine for years. (I am talking about 1-2" inches of dust everywhere!) Depends alot on the motherboard/processor combo and the quality of the components. BTW, a unit on the carpet will put up a lot more than if it is elevated or on a solid surface. (it also helps to clean the floors now and then) :D ---- One of the most critical parts is the power supply unit and fan assembly. Power down the unit, take it outside and use air compressor on the whole unit. When returning the PC back in operation, leave the cover off --- make sure all your tools, rags, etc are out of the box and then power it up. Visually check to see that the heat sink fans (on your video card, MB bridges, MB CPU, power supply etc) are all functioning and spinning properly. (alot of times one or more will just flop around or stick easily) ---- While my job hasn't been to "mess with PC boxes" for quite some time, it is funny how they basically stay the same. ;)

HTH. Good luck.
Andy
:D
 

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andy Man... you gotta clean your house more....

No kidding.. i work on pc's and its scarey when you open one up thats more than a few years old.. the dust is horrible.. i always keep a few cans of air on hand...


sj
 

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I read somewhere that using the hose/nozzle from your upright vacuum is not recommended. I can't see why not use it....if it is a static electricity issue, seems like air blowing over a component (fan, video card, RAM, etc) would be the same with canned air or vacuum nozzle (different speeds, yes). My assumption is the nozzle DOES NOT touch the components. Now, taking the wand brush and rubbing - that would be trouble.

Anybody know?
 

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They sell cans of air specifically designed for cleaning computers... you should use those only. Using a compressor can be risky since the air in a compressor is more prone to having moisture. Excess moisture blowing can cause very, very, very small amounts of static too. The possibility of having a problem using a compressor is very low, but IMHO, not worth the risk.
 

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Dougand3, The vaccume is notoriously staticly charged. We use a special vaccume to suck em clean. I don't know the physics, but they are just always charged.
As for the air compressor. The pressure would be the problem, the moisture would evaporate in minutes, unless it's really wet. I'd just give it a bit to air out before applying power.
I work on PCs in the operating rooms of a major hospital (32 OR rooms) and they always have wall-to-wall carpeting when you crack the case. Other than clogging air passages, and fans, the dust does surprisingly little damage. Usually, the disturbing it causes more problems than the dust.
BTW I'm a network engineer, so hardware is not my specialty, but frequently trouble shoot, and often that requires popping the case.

JimD
 

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Originally posted by tisenberg

They sell cans of air specifically designed for cleaning computers... you should use those only. Using a compressor can be risky since the air in a compressor is more prone to having moisture. Excess moisture blowing can cause very, very, very small amounts of static too. The possibility of having a problem using a compressor is very low, but IMHO, not worth the risk.
I used an air compressor set at 120 PSI on my old computer once. When I got it back together, I'd have to slap the side of the box to boot it every time. Turns out the compressed air loosened the microprocessor a little and the jarring would make enough of a connection for it to boot. I agree with tisenberg.
 

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Thanks, guys, good info.

I just don't like the idea of buying "pushed" air for $5 a can. I have many things around here that can push air, including...well, I won't go into that.

Argee, now really, is it so much of an imposition to bang the puter on bootup? LOL
 

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Originally posted by Argee
I used an air compressor set at 120 PSI on my old computer once. When I got it back together, I'd have to slap the side of the box to boot it every time. Turns out the compressed air loosened the microprocessor a little and the jarring would make enough of a connection for it to boot. I agree with tisenberg.

Why so much PSI no way you needed that much. Your $5.00 a can air don't have that much PSI.Me i use my air compressor to blow it out with just not that much PSI:cpu:
Jody
 

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Actually, aren't we americans (not intended to offend anyone) accused of being a disposable population... it's dirty, throw it away and buy a new computer :)
 

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Some of the PC's I get in here have been around long awhile. Lots of the power supplies are clear full allowing no air passage. If I used canned air at $5 a can, it would cost a fortune to blow them out, IF, they ever did.

I just use my air compressor set at about 25 lbs. and watch what I'm doing. I've not had any problems, so far.
 

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keyboard

From time to time I shake out my keyboard.There is enough stuff that finds it way into it that a small family of rodents could build a nest. I don't like any of the key protectors I have used.
 

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I think blowing out a power supply and blowing the motherboard, chips, memory, proc, etc is slightly different. The components in a power supply are not as suseptible than printed circuit boards and other components connected to a printed circuit board.
 

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Originally posted by jodyand

Why so much PSI no way you needed that much. Your $5.00 a can air don't have that much PSI.Me i use my air compressor to blow it out with just not that much PSI:cpu:
Jody
That was where it was set when I carried my cpu out to the shop. Without thinking, I let 'er rip.
:eek: oops!
 

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Andy or tisenberg,
I hit the back button without thinking causing a double post. When I go to edit, check delete, it tells me I'm not authorized. But as you can see it let me edit it. It worked once before when I screwed up. Something change?

Mark
 
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