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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I was finally able to rototil my wife's "kitchen garden". We do several acres at my place 3 miles from home, but she likes to have stuff right out the door. It has been wet, wet, wet, so this was the first day I could run the Deere and not tear everything up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Perrenials and Herbs

As you can see her flowers and herbs are flourishing. My wife has things planted everywhere. She divided a lot of her stuff and transplanted or potted them and sold them. She gets $1.00 apiece for potted perrenials and can't seem to keep them.
 

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The wife has a green thumb Slip. Nice garden. At a dollar each; that is not a bad cash business for her. Wish I could do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's all it Takes

Originally posted by Stewart
Looks nice, it looked like you only made two passes at most to till that up! :D
That ground is so alive it even amazes me. Earthworms by the thousands. I grew 8 foot tall tomatoes there two years ago.
 

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The proper tool for the job! It must have taken you longer to get the tractor loaded and unloaded than it did to till it! Ain't big boy toys great!:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Last Night

We got our first true killing frost, the castor bean plants my wife grows told the tale. For the most part the gardens were an unqualified success. My tomatoes did not produce the normal abundance, but around here nobody's did, rain at the wrong times. Cucumbers, beans, spaghetti squash, zukes, eggplants, salad crops, herbs, and peppers were up with the nicest yet. My corn went in the ground late and we had mixed results, although some of the ears were small, they were good eating.
Raspbeeries, black and red, blueberries, melons, and tree fruit all produced up to snuff. I still have cabbage growing covered in straw, also carrots the same way. we picked about 100 head of cabbage, red and green, lots of brocholli, and about 50 califlower.This years experiment was sweet potatoes developed for northern climates from Henry Field's. They needed 95 days to mature and I had my doubts. I doubt no more it was a bumper crop, average of 20 taters per plant. One monster was over five pounds and tastey to boot. My wife planted the little slimy sticks they sent in hills covered with black plastic and then tented with clear, sure seems like she knows the trick. Sweet potatoes are a true root crop and not a tuber like a potato so you get all sizes as the plant expands the roots into what you see at the store. We will be growing them again and more then the 20 plants this year.
All that is not what I want to talk about. We have a phenomina taking place at my flat farm. The green thumbed wife decided that it was time for new strawberries. So after much research on her part we purchased 100 plants each of three varieties. We picked a location to plant , I prepared the ground, did a soil test, added well rotted manure from my walking dog food herd, 12-12-12 fertilizer. Churned it all in and created rows. The wife did the planting and continually thinned out the runners all summer. With those she expended the patch to four or five times the original size. The whole shooting match is florishing, weed free and mulched with wheat staw for the winter. We will be in the berry business next year.
Now the phenomina I talked about; We have been picking strawberries from approximatly 25 or 30 of the original plants since the end of August, and they are still producing, large extremely sweet berries. This is unheard of in our neck of the woods. I have a commercial grower for a friend and he was amazed, I had to show him before he believed. Today I am going to the farm and pick maybe 25-30 berries, not many but any is so odd.
 

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Our garden didn't amount to much this year. None of the corn I planted sprouted, the tomatoes were late, peppers seemed to do well, and not much else. We had a killing frost a month ago, so it is done for the year. I used to have a 8' x 12' greenhouse at my old house that I built and used to have fantastic gardens, but I din't have time anymore, with a full time job that requires me to spend 2 1/2 hours a day just to commute, plus I'm getting old, just don't seem to have the time or energy. Maybe next year, I can get my daughter to help out.

What I should do is clear out a couple of trees and build another greenhouse to start my own plants. That way I'll have more control over the varieties I can grow, and have healthier plants. I'll also need to start shooting the critters that help themselves to MY food, both the 4 legged ones and the 2 legged ones:D
 

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Originally posted by bontai Joe
Our garden didn't amount to much this year.
Thats because your mutant neighbor's stripped it clean when you wasn't looking:lmao:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
picture taken November 9

this is what I mean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
odd

Originally posted by Argee
Wow slipshod...that's pretty amazing...Is that usual for your area...how close are you to the Great Lake??
as odd as it gets Argee, both the berries at this time of year and the late first frost are weird for around here. I am about 5 miles from Lake Erie.
 

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Had a rotton garden this year myself. So bad that there may noot be one next year. Only thing that realy grew was a hand full of tomatos, and pumkins. Oh and weeds. Pumkins EVERYWERE!!! only problem, they were growing like weeds before I eaven put in this years plants:confused: :confused: :confused: Seems like I had a few seeds left over in the ground somewere.:D
 

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It was a great year for pumpkins. I planted 25 atlantic giant seeds this year. The hardest part was fighting off the slugs.When we finally started to harvest them every kid in the neighborhood was smiling.Their fathers werent to happy though it seems 200 pound pumpkins are really hard to get a good grip on.My daughter was as proud as proud can be.
 

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Nice to have a wife with a green thumb.....Mine likes to dabble i th garden but she soon tires of it especially since she works 5 and 6 days a week, and other stuff, so about all she does isa help plant it, I maintain it, we both harvest it.

Next garden is going to be cut way back. I usually did not mind giving away excess veggies etc that the wife did not put up, but its just too much work and messing around to plant actually more than yu need anymore......I can say my drip irrigation really paid off with less weeds and better crops....and a lot lower water bill to boot.

Sweet potatoes are a big thing here, and it seems to be the norm to cover them all up with pine straw. I have only planated sweet taters one time, and they made fine. I have been letting an old fellow gather up as much pine straw as he wants and he always drops me off a mess of sweet potatoes in return..........
 

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Re: odd

Originally posted by slipshod
as odd as it gets Argee, both the berries at this time of year and the late first frost are weird for around here. I am about 5 miles from Lake Erie.
Western Michigan areas like Traverse City have a different climate than we do here in the middle of the mitt. They have a tremendous cherry crop and are becoming known for their wines. We can be finished with our fall colors here and they're just starting theirs. Go figure.... :confused:
 

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mcloud…
Did you take any pic’s? I would love to see one of them.

slip…
I always grow 8 foot tall tomato plants, no tomato’s, just 8 ft stalks :D
 
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