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All sorts of additives and anti-freeze have been used. The radiator seems to have a good flow. That made me suggest removing the pump and examine the passages, since the radiator was removed.

If the "suction port" is clogged or the wrong gasket is used, all suction effect will be on the "radiator port". That together with choked passages inside the block/head could give an abnormal underpressure on the suction side of the pump (= collapsed lower radiator hose), just like a choked radiator would do.

It is a theory that may be wrong, but I think it is better to examine things as far as possible to try to find an explanation. You may also find other problems to fix while you are at it.


But, without a functioning thermostat, the system is not working as intended.



Passage seen in screenshots from:

View attachment 75093

View attachment 75094
Just so we are on the same page:
The only suction in the entire system is on the suction side of the pump - ie, through that lower radiator hose.
The rest of the system is under pressure.
The pump sucks water from the lower radiator and Pushes it through the water jacket then through the upper hose back to the radiator.
 

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The only suction in the entire system is on the suction side of the pump - ie, through that lower radiator hose.
On the suction side of the pump is also the passage that I marked with an arrow in my previous post. It goes to the snout were the lower hose connects. When the thermostat is closed, the pump circulates coolant from the upper part of the engine through that passage, to the bigger hole at the bottom, through the engine and back to the pump.

We do not have thermostat or radiator cap, so if the hole with the arrow is clogged and the passages in the engine are choked, the pump will have a hard time moving around the coolant and there could be an underpressure at the suction side of the pump that makes the lower hose collapse. It was just an advice to the owner to check his equipment since it is convenient when the radiator is removed.


The rest of the system is under pressure.
It would have been if there was a radiator cap. If there was a proper thermostat and radiator cap, perhaps the lower hose never would have collapsed. It is impossible to solve a problem when vital parts are removed.

The pump sucks water from the lower radiator and Pushes it through the water jacket then through the upper hose back to the radiator.
What happens when the thermostat (upper hose) is closed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
OK, a lot of theories and suggestions.
I finally had the time and opportunity to look into his further. I did remove the water pump. Nothing clogged, no ports blocked. It is back on now.
The head bypass port, or shunt circuit, was ok, this is in place to also help in heating the head to assist the diesel action. Diesel's love heat and my removing the thermostat goes against that but the engine has always run ok.

Of course I find new things to work on whenever I do any work on this tractor. This time, among other things I cleaned out years of grease/dirt/etc from beneath the hydraulic pump. I believe my bushings for the front axle need replacing but that will have to wait.

I further looked at the radiator.I pushed water in from the bottom connection with a garden hose. I put the radiator on its front, filled the core with water, cap in place, and plugged the bottom connection, then pulled the draincock and put around 30 psi of air into it from the draincock. Top connection left open. Seemed to have loosened up 'stuff'. When I turned the radiator on its top and flushed it with water a lot of 'stuff' came out. Copper colored chunks of what appear to me to be solidified radiator sealant. Some of these chunks were well over a square inch, some approached 1/8th inch in thickness.
I think I resolved the clog issue. Walter flows through the radiator now with no interruption.
Haven't put the radiator back in yet, still doing other things with it removed as I now have access to those areas. Don't forget I have a loader attached to the tractor.

BTW is there a special connector for the oil pressure sensor? I've tried to make a standard 1/4" push on connector work but it doesn't want to slide on. Would a 3/8" work or is there a unique connector I need? This is a circular connection not a flat tab.

There was no charging circuit on this tractor when I bought it, the gauges were all disconnected, wiring pulled. I am in the process of fixing that now. Put a one wire alternator on it which works fine. Debating on changing the oil filter to a spin on stye but wonder if it is worth it, convenience, less messy only as I see it.
I have some welding to get done on it before I get the radiator back in and I don't weld!
 

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On the suction side of the pump is also the passage that I marked with an arrow in my previous post. It goes to the snout were the lower hose connects. When the thermostat is closed, the pump circulates coolant from the upper part of the engine through that passage, to the bigger hole at the bottom, through the engine and back to the pump.

We do not have thermostat or radiator cap, so if the hole with the arrow is clogged and the passages in the engine are choked, the pump will have a hard time moving around the coolant and there could be an underpressure at the suction side of the pump that makes the lower hose collapse. It was just an advice to the owner to check his equipment since it is convenient when the radiator is removed.



It would have been if there was a radiator cap. If there was a proper thermostat and radiator cap, perhaps the lower hose never would have collapsed. It is impossible to solve a problem when vital parts are removed.



What happens when the thermostat (upper hose) is closed?
I haven't been on here for a while. You may be right Hacke. I don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Hacke is absolutely correct this is the shunt or bypass circuit that is most active when the thermostat if installed is closed.
Nephew brought his welder to the tractor today and took care of some things I had to correct before installing the radiator. That welding is done but the radiator is still not reinstalled due to lack of time.
When he was here I found several more areas that require attention to the welds. Some of these are on the structural members of the loader bucket. Cracks and lack of penetration common!
Aim is still to get the tractor running again before I go further into the weld issues.
 

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Since you have the radiator removed, resolve 3-4 dishwasher tablets (or the same amount of powder) in boiling water, and fill the radiator with the solution. Leave the radiator standing upright for as long time as possible. If possible, heat the bottom now and then with a hot air blower.

When it is time to put the radiator back, keep it standing and empty it, flush with a hose from the top first, then backwards and forward again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Final update.
Thank you UltraDog for your common sense suggestion.
Yes I should have cleaned the radiator before even suggesting buying a new one.
I reinstalled the radiator as well as other items last week. Started the tractor and water flowed as it should have, no lower hose collapse.
Probably a self inflicted wound on my part when I was trying to 'fix' the block water jacket leak. Didn't realize that stop leak material could mess things up as it did.
Haven't run the tractor a lot yet but initial indications are that the 'new' JBW is holding -- so far.
Wouldn't surprise me if I caused the failure of the earlier fix by plugging the water flow.

Even with the above should a used engine show up for a reasonable price in good condition I would consider investing in it even if it is only stored away for another day. And no, I don't expect this to happen, seems these are as common as Edsel's, maybe less so.
 
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