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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 1965 Ford Industrial 3400 with loader. I have the older model power steering which has a separate reservoir behind the radiator. I lost the PS when I pulled plug #13...... D24A8ED1-8795-49DE-B8A3-953D502B69E3.png long story... was not aware that they had two separate PS setups. Replaced it and the spring and no more PS.

I bought the Oring kit but based on the tight location of the pump, I’m better off replacing the pump.
1.) Where do you find replacement pumps for the old set up?
2.) Has anyone converted from the old separate reservoir and pump to the newer pump with integrated reservoir? Recommendations?
3.) The lines from the pump to steering wheel are original and pretty crusty. I can easily see them failing when I remove the pump. Does anyone know where to find replacements. If so, where?

At this point the machine is winning and I have a couple rounds in me before it leaves the farm. Any and all help, suggestion, advice is greatly appreciated.
72525
 

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If it were my project I wouldn't worry about parts for that pump. I think I would simply replace it with a later style unit and do away with the separate reservoir. It would require a few changes in the pressure and return lines, but would be worthwhile in the long run. The pumps mount the same way, with the same bolts, and neither will be any fun given the loader, frames, and years of crud built up you get to deal with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yep, leaning that way, Probably fix the steering leaks at the same time. Any recommendations on a pump and where to get it?
 

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Recommendations? Not really. There are plenty of suppliers out there, many of which are all selling the same product at different prices. I purchase a lot of aftermarket stuff, from/through local dealers when possible so problems can be dealt with on site. Sometimes that's not an option so online purchases are the only option. There, you take your chances.

Check a number of sources, their prices, return policies, and customer reviews(when possible), Never choose the cheapest one. They're cheap for a reason.
 

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If your already going to replace the lines just update the pump. I brought my old lines in to my local Napa and they fabbed me new ones for cheeper than “OEM” would have been ordering them. pM me if you need pictures of how mine are ran on the 69.
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Hi, I have a 1965 Ford Industrial 3400 with loader. I have the older model power steering which has a separate reservoir behind the radiator. I lost the PS when I pulled plug #13...... View attachment 72525 long story... was not aware that they had two separate PS setups. Replaced it and the spring and no more PS.

I bought the Oring kit but based on the tight location of the pump, I’m better off replacing the pump.
1.) Where do you find replacement pumps for the old set up?
2.) Has anyone converted from the old separate reservoir and pump to the newer pump with integrated reservoir? Recommendations?
3.) The lines from the pump to steering wheel are original and pretty crusty. I can easily see them failing when I remove the pump. Does anyone know where to find replacements. If so, where?

At this point the machine is winning and I have a couple rounds in me before it leaves the farm. Any and all help, suggestion, advice is greatly appreciated.

Here are a few web sites: older model tractor parts at DuckDuckGo

willy
 

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It was all covered above...... there are a multitude of oem and after market places. If your New Holland dealer is worth while they should be able to find the parts as well, or just fix it for you. My granddad retired from New Holland as a mechanical engineer so I spent hours listening to him grumble about how things could have been made higher quality. Always keep in mind that how they did it at the factory was because it was the cheapest way at the time. That’s half the fun of an old tractor; as long as you understand some basic mechanical principles you can do all sorts of stuff to them.
 
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