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Ford 2000

Discussion in 'Buying & Pricing' started by Mr Mac, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. Mr Mac

    Mr Mac New Member

    16
    Oct 10, 2017
    Lula, GA
    We have recently purchased a small farm in Northeast GA and are about to buy a tractor to take care of the land. Right now I have my eye on a 1969 Ford 2000 (gas engine) that looks to only have the 4 speed which should be the economy model. The seller also has a TAFE diesel (I think he said a 2000 model, but can't be sure) for sale at the same price.

    I love the old Ford's and I know the TAFE is close to a MF (same company), but it will come down to what we do, I know. I will have about 9 acres that will need the bush hog taken to it once a season. There is an area that will need a finish mower taken to it once in a while. Quite a few post holes will need to be dug. One area of the eastern field will get plowed for a large personal use garden.

    Again, I love a good Ford, but there's a lot to be said about a diesel powered tractor, too. Longevity, fewer parts to contend with are but a couple!

    Thoughts?
     
    belchermw likes this.
  2. BigT

    BigT Member

    712
    Sep 15, 2014
    Hello Mac,

    It is interesting the the seller values the 48 year old Ford 2000 the same as the much newer TAFE tractor. Getting parts for the TAFE may be challenging in years to come. The Ford has many aftermarket parts available.

    I would hold out for a tractor with a loader....you will find a loader very useful.....saves wear & tear on your back in many situations.
     

  3. ar_confederate

    ar_confederate Member

    81
    Jul 20, 2015
    I was in a similar situation and bought the gasoline 1967 Ford 2000. All in all, it's done everything that I need and it's built like a tank. I don't know about your other choice but parts are available for the Ford. One problem though is a lot of the parts are made overseas and really don't measure up to the OEM. Case in point were some spark plug wires. They were cheaply made and kept coming off the plug. I had to do some modifications to the boot and the clip before they would stay on.
     
    pogobill likes this.
  4. Ultradog

    Ultradog Member

    116
    Feb 27, 2005
    The reason your spark plug boots were popping off is because the plugs were leaking compression.]
     
  5. ar_confederate

    ar_confederate Member

    81
    Jul 20, 2015
    That doesn't sound good. What would cause that?
     
  6. Ultradog

    Ultradog Member

    116
    Feb 27, 2005

    I ran into that a couple of times. Once they simply weren't tight.
    The other time I bought new plugs and that cured the priblem
     
    ar_confederate likes this.
  7. belchermw

    belchermw Supporting Member Supporting Member

    18
    Apr 4, 2017
    I bought a 67 ford n had same problem. Go to napa and get a spark plug hole chaser(it is a double ended tap) and will fit both spark sizes plug threads. It uses the spark plug socket as well, 13/16ths. Pull the plugs and run the chaser down till it bottoms out. Then take a light and shine down where spark plug washers seat and remove any gunk down to the bare (flat) surface of the head.

    Blow out any loose junk when done. (Computer duster spray works well.

    The chaser will allow the plugs to screw to correct depth.

    Cleaning under washer surface will allow plug washer to flatten out and seal better.

    I got the chaser for my old camaro “back in the day” as my kids remind me.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tractor Forum
     
    ar_confederate likes this.
  8. belchermw

    belchermw Supporting Member Supporting Member

    18
    Apr 4, 2017
    My 67 ford has the 4 spd. These have transmission pto n the bush hog will send power thru the tranny if it is still turning and send power to rear wheels even if clutch is depressed.
    I need to get a coupler to go from pto to driveshaft I’m told, to allow the coupler to ratchet and keep this from happening. Several farmers have related “running into the barn/gate/fence when they thought mashing the clutch would stop the tractor.
    I wish I had a different trans as it seems a little too high geared for me.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tractor Forum
     
  9. belchermw

    belchermw Supporting Member Supporting Member

    18
    Apr 4, 2017
  10. belchermw

    belchermw Supporting Member Supporting Member

    18
    Apr 4, 2017
    My friend has this one. Etowah, Tn. right above Chattanooga Tn.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tractor Forum
     
  11. Ultradog

    Ultradog Member

    116
    Feb 27, 2005
    The MF 165 is supposed to be a very good machine. But they are a fairly large machine. About the same size as a Ford 4000 (3cyl). Ive had a few of the 4000s but never kept one as they are a bit too big for my purposes. I agree the straight up 4 speed on the 2/3000s is a bit fast. My first 3 cyl Ford was a 2000 gasser and had that tranny. I did like it a lot and it did a lot of work for me - finish mowing, brush hogging, plowing, discing, etc. But the 3000 I have now has the 8 sp and it is a much better transmission.
    Mr Mac,
    Consider that you will have this tractor for a while. Maybe a long while. So don't rush into this. I suggest you hold out for a 2/3000 with either 6 or 8 speed. Or a 2600/3600 which are the same machines just a bit newer. Some guys will tell you you gotta have live pto but to me that's not so important even though I do a lot of mowing with mine.
    Given a choice between Lpto and power steering I would pick the PS any day.
    My 3000 does have both.
    Where abouts are you located? I scout the ads for these Fords all over the Midwest and could give you a shout if I see something you might like.
    As for gas v diesel both are very good engines. I run a diesel mostly but have a gasser too. The diesel stinks, rattles and is noisy but you never have to mess with fuel or spark issues. The gasser needs a bit more maintenance but is far more pleasant to operate.
     
    ar_confederate and BigT like this.
  12. marc_hanna

    marc_hanna Registered User

    108
    Apr 10, 2017
    I shopped for 4 months before I bought mine. I’m glad I did, because I got a great deal on a 4x4 Kioti with a cab, loader and backhoe.

    I would say must haves are:
    Front end loader
    4x4
    35+ hp

    Everything else is a luxury item.

    If you have a lot of digging projects like me, the backhoe is a must also. I would definitely recommend a chassis-mount hoe over the 3-point hitch style because the extra weight and stability makes a huge difference. I’ve also heard of other people damaging their 3pt’s with backhoes.
     
  13. Ultradog

    Ultradog Member

    116
    Feb 27, 2005
    4X4 would be nice but if I could only have ONE tractor - just one, it would defjnately not have a loader on it. Or it would have to be a quick tatch loader.
    A permanent fel turns an otherwise nimble machine into a dreadnought.
    For my purposes a 3 pt boom pole and rear scoop does most of the the jobs a loader would do and I can drop them off and not have them bouncing around in front all the time.
    I'm building a new tractor here, out of parts and pieces from 4 different tractors. It has an industrial front end on it so would be great for loader work. I'm hoping to replace my 3000 with it but if I don't like it I'll put a heavy loader on it and use it maybe 6 times a year.
     

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  14. marc_hanna

    marc_hanna Registered User

    108
    Apr 10, 2017
    Fortunately mine does have a quick detach FEL, but so far I haven't found a reason to take it off. It seems fairly well balanced with it on. If anything the quick detach bucket is the only part I would take off, but only to pop on other implements.

    When I'm moving earth and what not, it tends to be a combination of hoe and loader work, it would make it a pretty tedious task if I had to keep switching out tools on the back. But again, it all depends on what sort of projects/maintenance you have to do.

    I was humming and hawing about whether or not I really needed 4x4, but after a few months encountering mud, gullies, and other situations, I'm sure glad I got it.
     
    ar_confederate likes this.