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I'm new to the tractor world, so any comments are appreciated.

My wife and I are looking to purchase a compact tractor (about 30 HP) for use at our small farm (25 acres). We use the land mainly for animals; chickens, goats, turkeys, and pigs. We also do a large garden every year. Our tractor will have a front end loader, and in terms of attachments we plan on buying a rotary cutter and a tiller. We have talked to salesman from different manufacturers, and some say they always put fluid in the rear tires for ballast and traction, and others say for the tractor we want and how we will use it there is no need to put fluid in the tires.

So now we are confused. Is fluid really needed in the rear tires? Thanks for your comments.
 

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Welcome wcmlsx.

Ballist is for traction and proper balance with a front end loader especially with 2 wheel drive tractors. If you don't have proper counter balance example lifting a round bail you will not have good traction on rear drive and when lifting at a higher level you could do a nose dive and tractor is not as stable. Could cause a rollover. Front axle oscillates side to side. So my opinion is definitely load the rear tires with ballis unless you want to go with rear wheel weights.
Something else to consider is a quick attach on FEL for hay spear, bucket, forks and other attachment. Some attachment requires HYD to operate. Consider a remote for FEL and rear remote a must in my opinion.
Your thoughts on 40 HP is about right but a little to much HP is better then no enough. 40 would be at the bottom end for me on what you have discribed for a farm.
If your land is dry year round 2 wheel drive is ok but I prefer 4 wheel drive or front wheel assist.

Good luck
 

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If your ground is at all hilly the rear wheel ballast lowers the center of gravity in addition to providing improved weight distribution for safe operation of a loader. I ballast all my tractors equipped with loaders, big or small.

In my opinion the advantage in traction improvements alone is worth the small cost.

If you go with ballast, use the environmentally friendly organic based fluids. They do not rust your rear wheels, and a spill in the event of a puncture does not kill all the plant life.
 

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I'm kinda leaning with Kevin. If you are just tending to your critters and working a garden, consider getting wheel weights and if you think you need more weight on the back as a counter balance, make a weight box or leave your tiller on for the heavier lifts with the FEL.
 

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My R4"s rear have beet juice and it made BIG differents,more tractor better handling when using front loader or brush hogging.
 

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I have turf tires and no loader.
I heard all the stories about how great a difference loaded tires make & loaded mine.

Nothing.... Didn't help with anything I do.
SAtill need chains in the snow & if the ground is wet, tires just spin if I try to pull or push anything that is a little challenge.

For what you described, I wouldn't load them.
 

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I'm going to muddy the waters a bit more here, since opinions vary. If you have a compact utility with a loader, you need the weight. Even with the added weight in your tires, if you pick up something in your bucket without an implement and especially if you drop it and then stop it, you might end up tipping forward. I say this because eventually you are going to use your tractors loader one time when you have no implement on the back. I know I sure have. It's a fail proof safety that costs little to add.
 

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Always blast if you have a loader. Friend of mine tipped his on it's nose trying to lift too much, then trying to dump into pickup . Tractor fared better that pickup. Some tension resulted from who pays to fix pickup. Not a good situation. $150 worth of ballast may have prevented the entire fiasco.
 

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It depends on tractor and weight lifting, I have a Massey Ferguson 255 and while lifting my brush hog mower, and moving it, I got stuck, though only for a second after turning front wheels. The weight up front was making rear very light with no traction. The mower is a 6 ft titan and lift point was over bucket lip. I’m looking at filling wheels and adding wheel weights.
 

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Dad has 2 tractors. The old kubota doesn't have liquid. It needs something on the back to hope to use the loader anywhere near its limits, preferably the 3point backhoe.

When he decided he needed another larger tractor, He wanted something with better loader performance. I talked him into getting filled industrial tires for it. It is so much safer to use the loader in that tractor. The back end just stays planted.

The industrial tires are much better for loader work than Ag tires because they are wider. Wider front keeps the little tires from sinking so much under load. Wider rears give you much more liquid volume.

Tilling with loaded tires might be a touch counterproductive.

Not sure you need tons of hp or size for you uses. Dad keeps t he e little kubota 25hp L series CUT mainly for gardening. There is s definitely such thing as too much tractor for that.

Honestly, since you aren't going to be bailing 25 acres, something like his kubota might be perfect for you. As far as ballast, you could as always do a partial fill, and see how it goes. That has the added benefit of keeping the CG of the added weight lower as well.

One more thing about hp, under 25hp has much simpler emission systems on it. Its certainly a factor to consider. Since you are near that threshold, I might stick under it to have more reliability and lower up front costs ascociated with the lower hp engine. Maybe something like a Deere 3025d? Gear drive also makes better use of the limited hp than a Hydro.
 
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