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I saw this on the Gerdenweb site and I thought it was a great way to explain and test Electric PTO's. Its a PDF file and it explains how the PTO works better then I can.
 

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Thanks Michael ive been looking for something like that just to have incase i ever need to do it.:thumbsup:
 

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How about making this a Sticky? This seems to be a good one for it.
 

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I have something similar on testing procedures in the maintenance manual for my John Deere Lawn Tractor but this is the easiest and best one I spotted in a long time. Sometimes it helps with better drawing and is made easy with its diagrams.
 

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Originally posted by Michael
I saw this on the Gerdenweb site and I thought it was a great way to explain and test Electric PTO's. Its a PDF file and it explains how the PTO works better then I can.
Good basic trouble shooting. Just keep in mind Ogura also makes a clutch similar to the Warner Magstop (magnetic stop) that has no airgap adjustment. The mag stops are more common on consumer models where the clutch will stop the blade rotaion after disengagement instead of a brake system of pads down in the pulleys (ala low end mTD,Sears,etc.)

Also keep in mind that on the adjustable clutches too much air gap causes the magnet to draw more amps and blow fuses.........some of our do-it-yourselfers (aka "screwed-it -up-myselfers)lol... just put a higher value fuse in place........stops the blown fuses, but really fries the field coil and wiring when it starts drawing upwards of 15-30 amps trying to stay a magnet. Most of these circuits are 7.5 to 10 amp circuits. We have some come in 30amp fuses in them....blown.

:rolleyes:
 

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Thanks Neil for the info. I tend not to use the dealer to much as I used to a mechanic and mechanical items I understand really well. If I have any question I have a buddy that runs a Wheel Horse dealer nearby and he is a good friend. He does and will explain things to me and assist me over the phone but I have only need him once on my dads old Craftsman lawn tractor 3 years ago. After my dad moved into town He sold everything except a old Lawnboy 2 stroke push mower.
 

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Just the basics:
If I may - let me add a few things to this PTO checkout. The PDF file shows what impedance the coil should have (approx).

It does not however show the fact that the PTO wiring goes in series with a seat cutoff switch and a toggle switch to turn it on-off.

Often thiose switches are overlooked.

Also, if the impedance is under about 1 Ohm then the coill in then the PTO is probabaly bad. Ditto if the coil has a high impedance - then it is open and it may replacing.
 

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"The clutch assembly should be kept free from debris buildup." Ah... That ain't gonna happen. Ogura and Warner are both really proud of their clutches and their price reflects it. Over the past few years, I've started using Extreme Clutches when a customer needs a replacement. They are much stouter built, run cooler, have bigger/replaceable bearings, they are also 25%-35% cheaper than Ogura, or Warner. Because they have a billted aluminum pulley rather than stamped steel, they transfer the heat from the belt much better. End results... Belts last much longer. When it's time to replace, I've found they are a big upgrade over Ogura, or Warner, and your wallet will it appreciate it.

https://xtremeope.com/?mrkgcl=1182&mrkgadid=3262593148&rkg_id=0&creative=71124701268917&device=c&matchtype=e&msclkid=eb438ca2bc6a1aa14ea7d1d575925202&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Search - Brands - Clutch&utm_term=+extreme +clutch&utm_content=Xtreme > Clutch&gclid=CIvlhLLRxuQCFQdlgQod3CEFGA&gclsrc=ds
 

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The Ogura that failed on me was a bearing failure.
I've got to think that is normally how it happens.
 
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