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If your filter housing is set up for an inner and an outer filter in my mind it would be foolish not to use both, I blow my outter out with an air nozzle carefully, If the inner is showing dirt and dust I change them both as the outer should have caught all the dust the inner is a safety filter.
 

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If your filter housing is set up for an inner and an outer filter in my mind it would be foolish not to use both, I blow my outter out with an air nozzle carefully, If the inner is showing dirt and dust I change them both as the outer should have caught all the dust the inner is a safety filter.
 

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Unless you're in a real dry & dusty area, I believe that you are better off with a good pre-cleaner (Donaldson are good). I service a Gregoire grape harvester through the annual vintage in the Mildura area each year, and the pre- cleaner gets most of the dust, then I blow out the outer filter. This is done every day. The inner filter gets replaced once per year whether it needs it or not. All the earth moving equipment in this area also run pre-cleaners.
 

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Hi all,

Does anyone use an outer and inner air filter combo on their tractor? It seems like it's generally optional. Just wondering what everyone's experience is, such as better filtration versus poorer fuel economy, etc.
Deutz air-cooled tractors use this configuration and it works well. These tractors have some of the best fuel economy statistics in the industry
 

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I would think especially if you are in dusty conditions. There is no way the engine can get "too clean" air.
Unless you're in a real dry & dusty area, I believe that you are better off with a good pre-cleaner (Donaldson are good). I service a Gregoire grape harvester through the annual vintage in the Mildura area each year, and the pre- cleaner gets most of the dust, then I blow out the outer filter. This is done every day. The inner filter gets replaced once per year whether it needs it or not. All the earth moving equipment in this area also run pre-cleaners.
 

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My Cub Cadet lawn tractor has an outer and inner filter. I have had to change the outer foam filter because it disintegrated, but the paper filter was ok. When you get a new Kohler filter, they sell you both, like it or not.
I like my Ford 2000 air filtering system, cyclone cleaner on the hood an oil bath in the radiator area. Cheap to change. Can’t say that about the Kohler filters!
 

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In my 40 years working with MF MM Oliver and others I have seen most harvest equipment come with the outer element and as they called them a safety or inner element. Most but not all tractors had just the outer element but had a safety element as an option. With this knowledge no the outer filter is not a course dirt remover and the inner in not a fine dirt remover. The outer element is THE main filter which was explained earlier. It is a safety element in case the outer element gets a hole in it or leaks at the seals. The outer element is supposed to be cleaned when it becomes plugged or extremely dirty that is why they started using those restriction indicators. The inner element is only supposed to be changed when the outer element replacement does not "fix" a restriction. It is NOT recommended to over service the outer element too frequent cleaning can break the filter media loose, especially using an air compressor or bumping the element on a tire. Donaldson had made a special soap powder to mix with water and wash them. Some folks used just a mild detergent and it worked fine. After cleaning the recommended using a light inside the filter to look for holes and tears. One caution though be sure the filter is completely dry be fore using it. Most folks on combines had two elements one to wash and dry and one in the machine. To help keep the filters from needing too frequent cleaning they installed many types of precleaners, most were a centrifugal type that spun the air and then ejected dirt or collected it in a bowl and then needed to be emptied.
So, if you replace the outer filter, and that does not fix the restriction you replace the inner filter as well, aren't you saying that the inner filter is restricted? Doesn't that mean there is dirt in it? Like I said, I agree that the outer is the main filter, but to imagine the inner FILTER is not doing any filtration at all does not seem logical to me. But again, I am not an expert mechanic, just a journeyman operator that has maintained many pieces of equipment over the years. By the way, for what it's worth I feel like IHRedman that oil bath pre cleaners are great, and cheap, but OEM's always look for ways to make more money. So inner filters may just be another way for them to make more money! I have yet to see an outer/main filter get a hole in it or fail, unless the hole was put in it by someone while cleaning it. Not saying it does not happen, just that I have never seen it.
 

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I just bought a brand new kioti rx7320 tractor. I went to clean the air filter for the first time and noticed it only has one filter element. but it has a spot in the canister for a secondary filter, since I live in Southern California and it never rains here, everything is extremely Dusty. I ordered a replacement primary filter and a inner filter which they do make the inner filter
 

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I just bought a brand new kioti rx7320 tractor. I went to clean the air filter for the first time and noticed it only has one filter element. but it has a spot in the canister for a secondary filter, since I live in Southern California and it never rains here, everything is extremely Dusty. I ordered a replacement primary filter and a inner filter which they do make the inner filter
Good idea. Every Kubota I've owned has both. Turbo charged and naturally aspirated and Donaldson make all the filter cannisters for Kubota btw. Probably for Kioti as well. I chage my inners ever few years, outers get blown out with low pressure compressed air often (I farm with mine) and replaced ever 2 years no matter what. Diesels by their very nature will only have a power loss form a dirty air filter, if the filter is totally clogged. and it it was is, the engine would suck the filter media out of the filter (why diesel filters usually) have wire mesh over the media and inside the filter media as well.

Kind of unpleasantly surprised yours didn't come with an inner filer in as much as the air cleaner has the spot for it.
 

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Years ago when I was working with farm equipment the outer filter was referred to as the air filter the inner filter was referred to as the safety filter.
The Main filter is supposed to do all the filtering the safety element was only used in case the outer filter leaked.
We were taught to clean the outer element either with low air pressure and never blow directly at the element or by washing the element and allowing it to dry, thoroughly inspecting the filter before reusing it also not if washed it has to be dried completely.
If any dirt was viewed on the safety element it and the main element is to be replaced immediately as the outer element is leaking.
Some folks over serviced the air filters causing dirt to enter the engine, this is why restriction indicators are used some are self contained and turn red when the filter begins to plug or there may be a light that glows when the filter gets restricted.
Do you self a favor and do NOT over service the filter, it can be worse than not servicing it. Over servicing can also cause issues with dirt entering the engine when the filter is removed and reinstalled and can cause problems with the seal on the end of the filter.
Manufactures often recommended a precleaner for dirty, dusty conditions. They clean the air before it even gets to the air filter. Some were of the plastic bowl that had to be removed and dumped occasionally, there were Tubo precleaners that used an internal fan to "blow" the dirt out of the air, then there were the aspirated precleaners that spun the air and used a vacuum ejector on the exhaust to remove the dirt.
No matter the "dry type" air filter beats the old oil bath air cleaner for servicing any day!
 

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How Kubota refers to the 2 filter system and I have the filter minder gage on both my M's. According to Donaldson a dirty (but not caked up) air filter cleans better tan a clean one. I put a bit of chassis grease on the base on mine when I install them, makes installing them easier in the molded cups in the air cleaner body. Tight fit.
 

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My '91 JD 4255 came with outer & inner(safety) filters when it rolled off the assembly line. I had pistons/liners installed @ 11,400 hrs of use in Spring 2000 due to failed piston liner sealing ring. Engine before OH only used a quart or 2 of oil between oil changes. My '11 Kubota M7040 has inner & outer air filters.
 

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Interesting Jim. Neither of my Kubota's at 6000 and 3000 hours use any oil between changes or I should say very little. All engines consume a bit of oil, it's the nature of a 4 stroke engine be it gas or diesel. Far as economy goes (fuel used per hour), any mechanically injected pre 4 engine will always be more fuel efficient that a late model post 4 emissions engine because they all use diesel fuel in the oxidation process of the accumulated soot so fuel efficiency (used per hour) will drop.

Have a friend with a pair of 4020 JD's he uses in his produce operation to mostly pull wagons and some light tillage and both have rolled over the hour meters with very little major issues. I find that pretty amazing. I believe both have had in frames but neither have had the engines out.
 
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