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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Does anyone use an outer and inner air filter combo on their tractor? It seems like it's generally optional. Just wondering what everyone's experience is, such as better filtration versus poorer fuel economy, etc.
 

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My John Deere 990 has a dual element and honestly, the inner element has never shown signs of getting dirty. My Kubota BX 2200 has a single filter element.
 

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Aren't they two different filtration ratings? The outer handles the course and the inner the fine?

The OEMs do it like that for a reason. That sure isn't the place I'd try to pick up 1/10th of a hp at.

Eta, not too surprising that a bx would go creap on the air filter. They are overgrown lawnmowers (no offense intended) and were never intended to spend thousands of hours kicking up dust in a field. And of course filter tech is improving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Both my Kioti and Kubota use the same air filter, and neither came with the inner filter. The outer filter on both is normal filter media and it seems to me, if i used the second filter, it would be very restrictive.
 

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I wonder if the air filter canister is even set up for the double filter? My Case has the double filter set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Kioti manual describes it as optional for dusty environments, but the Kubota manual has no info on air filter at all, except when to change it. Having never used the dual filter before, I wouldn’t even know what I’m looking for to see if they are set up for dual filters. I just assumed one interlocked into the other
 

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My air filter canister has a "cup" that the filter seats into to make a seal at the bottom end. There is also another "cup" in the center of the bottom end, about the size of a spray paint can lid, for the inner filter to plug into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ll have to take a look when I replace them. The outer filter on its own seems to be doing the job and I dont operate the equipment in what I would consider a dusty environment.
 

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My John Deere Z-Trac mower has the dual filter arrangement. I blow the dust out of my outer filter periodically, with compressed air. IMO, the inner filter has one purpose. If you ever see any dirt on the inner filter, this means your outer filter is leaking and must be replaced immediately. The inner filter provides some backup to protect your engine till the filter elements are replaced
 

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often you can get the same engine with a a couple of different air filter options.
The sawmill I run has a dual filter for it Kohler Command big block twin, CH940 32hp IIRC. I know the same engine is used in equipment with a single filter, and I think there are more than 2 options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think I’ll add the second filter and give it go.
 

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My Kubota B2400 has both filters plus a cyclone built into the end of the air filter housing which will remove a good percentage of the dust before reaching the outer filter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Heavy equipment operating in landfills and rock quarries run in about as heavy of a dust environment you'll ever find and they always run dual filters. They also run filter restriction gauges (Filter Minder). If you don't currently have one, they're easy to plumb into the system and they run about $15.....



http://filterminder.com/products/vi...triction-monitoring-gauge-threaded-mount.html
I’ve got one of those on my cummins. I usually change my air filters out long before it shows in the red.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My Kubota B2400 has both filters plus a cyclone built into the end of the air filter housing which will remove a good percentage of the dust before reaching the outer filter.
It seems to be the general consensus that everyone has both.
 

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I’ve got one of those on my cummins. I usually change my air filters out long before it shows in the red.
Yep... Most people do, that is unless you're running a fleet of 1,000 OTR tractors with a set of air filters running about $100 to change for each unit. That's $100,000 worth of air filters. You can piss a whole bunch of $$$ money away by not changing them until the Filter Minder hits 22".

Donaldson designs/builds the air intake systems for just about everybody now days. They say change at 22" of H2O in all of their service literature. I've actually been to several Donaldson seminars where they said their air filters don't actually hit their peak filtration efficiency until about 11"
 

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Hi all,

Does anyone use an outer and inner air filter combo on their tractor? It seems like it's generally optional. Just wondering what everyone's experience is, such as better filtration versus poorer fuel economy, etc.
John Deere started using two air filters in the late 60^s
Normally change inter filter 1/3 as many times as the outer or unless noticeably dirty.
 

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It depends on the environment you are using your tractor. My rule of thumb would be, if the environment is not too dusty, and you have a pre cleaner (a centrifugal air intake adapter as seen on most all industrial and ag tractors), then an inner filter should not be necessary. But if the environment is dusty, then I would go for the inner filter. The difference in the amount of air being inducted through multiple air filter elements as opposed to one, would be negligible, unless they were both dirty or have excessive amounts of moisture in them. Another consideration should be the type of dirt in your working environment, as some dust particulates are of different sizes than others. Others here have said that the inner filter is just a safety filter, and I agree with that mostly. While I am not an expert trained mechanic, I am of the opinion that the inner filter does catch certain size particulates that can, and do pass the primary, as this only makes common sense, as mentioned here, the filter media does have holes in them to allow for air to pass. But those "holes" are very small. I imagine there are equally small dust particulates that can pass the primary filter media. Just because there is no visible dirt in the inner filter, doesn't mean that there is no dirt in the media, just that it is not visible. But to be honest, dust of this size should not be of too much concern, if any. Also, you may wish to invest in a pre cleaner as opposed to an inner element, as this would be your first line of defense in your air intake. Many of the OEM pre cleaners are not very good (cheap). If your tractor does have a pre cleaner, you can compare what you have on your tractor to the pre cleaners found in your tractor store or online as a way to determine if you should replace the OEM one (if you are in doubt, I suggest taking a picture of your pre cleaner and posting it here and getting some advice as to whether you should replace it or not). Also, you should not attempt to clean an inner filter. If there is visible dirt/dust on an inner filter, just replace it, as inner filter medias are not designed to be cleaned, unless there is some product out there that I am not aware of that calls for it, but I have never seen a "cleanable" inner air filter element in my 35 years of being a heavy equipment operator.
 

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In my 40 years working with MF MM Oliver and others I have seen most harvest equipment come with the outer element and as they called them a safety or inner element. Most but not all tractors had just the outer element but had a safety element as an option. With this knowledge no the outer filter is not a course dirt remover and the inner in not a fine dirt remover. The outer element is THE main filter which was explained earlier. It is a safety element in case the outer element gets a hole in it or leaks at the seals. The outer element is supposed to be cleaned when it becomes plugged or extremely dirty that is why they started using those restriction indicators. The inner element is only supposed to be changed when the outer element replacement does not "fix" a restriction. It is NOT recommended to over service the outer element too frequent cleaning can break the filter media loose, especially using an air compressor or bumping the element on a tire. Donaldson had made a special soap powder to mix with water and wash them. Some folks used just a mild detergent and it worked fine. After cleaning the recommended using a light inside the filter to look for holes and tears. One caution though be sure the filter is completely dry be fore using it. Most folks on combines had two elements one to wash and dry and one in the machine. To help keep the filters from needing too frequent cleaning they installed many types of precleaners, most were a centrifugal type that spun the air and then ejected dirt or collected it in a bowl and then needed to be emptied.
 
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