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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a new 5205 FWD and I will be bushhogging and clearing trails in the woods on my 88 acre farm. I have some limited experience (about 4 months) with Tractors however nothing this big. I previously owned a Ford 2000 and it did just fine as far as handling goes on my gently rolling hills. However this is a bigger machine and I was wandering about weights and what I might need to navigate these hills more safely. I am already having my dealer widen the wheels to 6 ft. Should I also get the tires loaded with CaCl? What other weights should I consider? Thanks guys
 

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Calcium chloride tends to rot out the rims after a while (think years) and most lawn tractor guys opt for windshield washer fluid for it's less corrosive properties. Of couse with the little tires, we only talking abot 6-8 gallons per wheel so the cost is small. Ithink the 6 foot width was a great idea and I'd let it go at that untill you see how it works out. "Suitcase" weights are a good way to go as you can add or remove them easily from the front or back as needed if you decide to add weights later. No special tools needed and a lot lighter and easier to handle than the big iron wheel weights.
 

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Originally posted by Kenny
Just bought a new 5205 FWD and I will be bushhogging and clearing trails in the woods on my 88 acre farm. I have some limited experience (about 4 months) with Tractors however nothing this big. I previously owned a Ford 2000 and it did just fine as far as handling goes on my gently rolling hills. However this is a bigger machine and I was wandering about weights and what I might need to navigate these hills more safely. I am already having my dealer widen the wheels to 6 ft. Should I also get the tires loaded with CaCl? What other weights should I consider? Thanks guys
Welcome to Tractor Forum Kenny! :friends: :cheers: Nice machine you have there! :thumbsup: Depending upon the weight and size of the rotary cutter you are using and any FEL if installed; you may or may not need weights.

Obviously you will need to have sufficient down force on the front axles & wheels to allow for good traction especially when turning and most importantly going up slope to prelude the front end rising up on you. (this is a BIG safety concern) Pay close attention to this.

Normally if you have a FEL installed, this is enough weight on the front to address this need with all but the most heavy of implements. If you don't have a FEL installed, you most likely will require the front suit case weight kit and enough weights to compensate for the added weight of the rotary cutter.


<img src="http://jdpc.deere.com/pimages/LVP3/LVP3252________UN08FEB02.gif">


The kit comes as part #'s

LVB25135 Kit $132

RFR51680 20 pack of weights $1440 (ouch!)

R51680 If you prefer to buy the weights individually $79.20


Items 4 thru 8 I am not certain come with the kit so I think best to ask your dealer to confirm this.

With respect to filling the rear tires vs. wheel weights; this is a matter of personal preference and costs.

The wheel weights are the most expensive route but have the advantage of not having to deal with the HUGE mess of cleaning up spilled tire fluid after a flat. Let me know if you want cost info. they are pretty expensive.


<img src="http://jdpc.deere.com/pimages/LVP5/LVP577_________UN21APR95.gif">


There are 3 types of tire filling materials you can use.

NaCl, which is highly corrosive, the second heaviest tire filling material, second most expensive, and toxic to plant life. You don't want to spill a tires worth on the ground; it will be years before anything grows there again.

Rim Guard (aka windshield wiper fluid). It is the least heaviest, least toxic, and least expensive. It may not meet your rear tire ballast requirements in heavier applications. (I have this fluid in my rear tires for FEL ballast weight)

Lastly, tire foam, which is the heaviest tire filling material, most expensive of the 3, and least toxic. This method also has the great advantage making the tire flat and puncture proof; but some don't like the alledged stiffer ride.

I would suggest the rim guard fluid unless you are operating in an area which causes you frequent flat tires. If you still need more rear ballast weight; you can always add wheel weights. Hope this answered your questions.
 

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<h1>Welcome Kenny!</h1>

Quite a step up from a Ford 2000 (I am a Ford restorer and owner) What a nice tractor! :D Post pics when you can!
You used the 2000 to bushhog 88 acres? Do you have a large cutter or batwing? Welcome aboard!

Thanks!
-Andy
 

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Excuse my poor manners Kenny, welcome to the forum! My mom did raise me better than that, but I'm sad to say a lot has worn off over the years. I look forward to some pics of your new tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the great information. I will wait to see how she handles before I load her down with any weights. A FEL was not in the budget, however I did get the Dual SCV Mid stick so it can be purchased next year. It was either FWD or the FEL and I decided I can always add the FEL later whereas I cannot add the 4WD later. I'm only bushhogging about 20 acres on the farm, bottom land and trails. The rest will be hayed and some will eventually be seeded for wildlife attraction. The farm is half pasture and half woods. It is definitely a step up from the Ford 2000, I can't wait to get some seat time. The Tractor will come in some time next week and you can guess what I will be doing next weekend. Probably won't be able to post pictures to share because I'm not that smart yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Decided to get FEL

The tractor that the dealer found also has a FEL on it. At first I decided against the FEL, but over the weekend I changed my mind. He gave me a heck of a deal on the FEL so now my 5205 FWD will have a loader.
 

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Re: Decided to get FEL

Originally posted by Kenny
The tractor that the dealer found also has a FEL on it. At first I decided against the FEL, but over the weekend I changed my mind. He gave me a heck of a deal on the FEL so now my 5205 FWD will have a loader.
You will be glad you made that move. I concider a tractor without a front end loader only half a machine.
 

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Good choice there by going with the FEL --- Not only very useful for use, it does offer some really nice ballast weight to the tractor. Post some pics when you get a chance! :D

Congrats!
Andy
 

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Discussion Starter #11
FEL added, now more Weight?

Since I decided to add the FEL, now do I need to be concerned about weight (especially in rear)? Right now, I do not plan to get tires loaded with CaCl.
 

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With the loader in the front, rear weight is VERY beneficial. I still think suitcase weights are the way to go as they are easy on-easy off, and you can move them to the front to counterbalance a rear tiller or brush mower.
 

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Re: FEL added, now more Weight?

Originally posted by Kenny
Since I decided to add the FEL, now do I need to be concerned about weight (especially in rear)? Right now, I do not plan to get tires loaded with CaCl.
YES, You ABSOLUTELY DO need to either get the rear tires filled and/or add rear wheel weights. With the FEL installed, even empty there will be a considerable weight shift to the front axle and you will find this out going down hill with the FEL installed. The rear tires will just skid down the hill. Ask me how I know. My 4410 will do this if the grass is wet and I have the rear tires filled. This is a very serious safety concern so don't ignore the need for rear ballast with a FEL installed.
 

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I took the "Super Man" ride to the bottom of a steep hill on the Kubota L245 that had the L1200 FEL on it last year. I have the "rust stains" in my draws to prove it. :D ;) The rear tires just started to slip and by the time I realized that it was the tires slipping and not the tractor's drive train; (I had the brakes applied) I had skidded to the bottom of the hill at a much faster speed than I would have liked. I have since learned to drop the FEL bucket if this happens. The FEL manual that comes with the FEL Kenny decideds to have installed on his tractor will specify the amount of rear ballast weight recommended. You don't need to add the entire amount specified but if you load the FEL to its limits you will.
 

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If you cannot or do not want to utilize hitch mounted ballast; you can substitute rear wheel weights. Just bare in mind that they are VERY expensive. This is something you WANT to negotiate into your tractor purchase price. This will allow you to finance this additional equipment AND it will give a bit more bargaining leverage since you are buying more product and services from the dealer. If he lets you take the tractor off his lot without some type of rear ballast and the FEL installed (unless you have personally requested and made this arrangbement); I will be VERY surprised. It would also indicate to me that this dealer either does not fully understand what he should be doing or does not care.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just left the dealer, he said not to worry about it as long as I have my bushhog attached. Otherwise he recommended weights. He did not recommend the tires getting loaded w/ CaCl because of the corrosion factor.
 

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Originally posted by Chief
I took the "Super Man" ride to the bottom of a steep hill on the Kubota L245 that had the L1200 FEL on it last year. I have the "rust stains" in my draws to prove it. :D ;)
That had to be one wild ride:eek:
 
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