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Friends & Hammerheads,

I am going to gut out my existing 36x24 cypress pole barn conversion workshop and pour new concrete floor. With the advent of the wife's new plans for horses, I don't want too many buildings spread around the property --- taking up space.

Layout:
Currently have pole construction which was heavily reinforced and hurricane straps, joist/rafter brackets added on every piece of lumber in shop. Added 2x4PT collar ties across each rafter segment at same time. Added new posts with concrete support. Added walls to front of open pole barn. Currently the walls are simply 2x6s between 12' spaced posts with double 2x8 top plates. I used cypress planks spaced 1/2"-3/4" on the walls. Currently rafters extend over top plate with no soffet -- open and exposed to elements and critter access. Need to figure out how more economical way to keep more elements out.

Issues: Concrete slab. There is existing 4" slab on the back 24x18 (1/2 overall building size) that is even with dirt floor in front 24x18 segment. So i am assuming I can either frame the walls and simply pour another 4" slab across entire shop (losing 4" of valuable headroom in process) or dig out front dirt with trusty box scraper down to 4" or even with existing slab? How to frame plank walls to accept concrete pour? Outside and let concrete settle between cracks? (haha) or lay down piece inside and leave in place after concrete sets --- need stronger reinforcement than than I am assuming) ??

Is there any advantage to dig out to 3" on front and add new 1" layer of concrete to older slab in back or does this not proper way of handling this situation) --- Slab in back has couple large cracks in it but otherwise in good condition. I was thinking I could keep this back slab in place and add a nice landing area in front of workshop (ground is currently slag gravel driveway) about 6'-10' out from workshop for working out in the sun etc --- assuming this could be sloped out towards driveway for drainage.

How difficult will it be to pour a new slab inside a walled and roofed area with only 8' joist clearance? Two big 12' x 8' doors on either side of front. (Can you imagine how much these weigh with 1"+ cypress rough planks on front?) --- Seem like a ton! Made em last year.

Walls: How to address the spaces between planks and lack of soffit to keep more of the elements and critters out? I don't think I am looking to insulate and finish this workshop --- but I guess that could certainly be a consideration. Recommendations?


Thanks
Andy
 

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I would talk with a concrete guy about those issues, he will be able to give you the best solution and you can show him what you want.. I hope they don't have to tear out the existing stuff!

I have no clue of how to plug the holes at the top of the walls, I will have to ponder that one....Hmmmmm? Again you might make some calls to local folks that puts pole barns up and see what they do for their buidings.

I would try and keep as much headroom as possible, I am 6'4" so I hate low celings, I am always afraid of hitting my head.

Getting a slab inside a building shouldn't be too hard, you can use wheelbarrows or I am sure you cam pump it in. More money for the pump but it might be easier.

Are you doing the concrete yourself or hiring it done??:nerd:
 

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Was thinking about scraping & framing the area myself and letting the trucks from the ole' ready-mix pour & float/finish the job. 2500 is standard concrete right? Any reasons to go to 3000 or fibermesh additions? Want a clean smooth surface.

Andy
 

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In my neck of the woods, 3000 psi concrete is what gets used as a minimum. Rebar is better reinforcement than wire mesh if you are so inclined to use it, or have it available. Your concrete delivery guys also do the float and finish? That is unheard of in my area. They deliver and leave as quick as possible. We always had to supply our own laborers to spread and finish concrete, and you are talking about a fairly big pour, more than one truck I'm guessing. Make sure you have help on site BEFORE the concrete truck shows up!
 

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I agree with the rebar, it will pay down the road. I am not sure of my skills to finish contrete. I am afraid of how it would turn out. I would keep messing with it and screw it up!:dazed:
 

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andy -- you may want to just pour on top of existing slab if it is good-- but I would tear it out and do one reinforced pour-- as for the open wall tops and the rafters jutting out-- one solution I have seen tta works for both winter and summer is to put borads of a tight fit over th e openings and hinge them on the back side to the wall -- put a simple rotating clip in front and close it up in winter and in summer rotate the clips and open them up -- drop the boards down on the hinges to allow airflow-- use screens behind them to keep out pests -- have fun-- and if you pour concrete completely around the posts it will trap moisture in and cause faster rot-- even cypress rots eventually-- bigl22
 

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Don't know if the 1in poar over the old would hold up. I would think it would just crack, and flake off. Easyest would be to just pour the front to the same hight as the rear, but would not look good. That plus the fact that you say you have some big cracks in the slab, I would say rip it out. Something made the slab crack, so might as well take it out, and rebar a full slab. [ya ya I know, not my money:D ]

Now for the soffets. You have an opening from the top plate to the roof sheathing at every rafter bay right? Thats what you are trying to close up? If so, I would just cut, and scribe boards to fit the opening. This would leave the rafter tails open out side, to give the nice rustic look, but still seal up the barn. Or you could box in the rafter tails and make it a closed soffet.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good ideas there! Paul (I444), I think the cracking was due to the fact that no one bothered to scribe an expansion joint in the large existing slab and who knows what kind of sub-base/reinforcement they used. I was going to use 3000# with fibermesh addition to avoid having that kind of problems again with the cracking. So basically scrape out dirt area inside of workshop down to 4" and then come out of the doors and dig out a nice landing area (that slopes away from the workshop) about 10' out.

Thanks for the insight on the hinged soffets, big22/
...more good ideas ---- It might cost a ton to close in this building ---- Let me start pricing it out and figuring out how effective and economical it will be to do this. I think concrete with landing will really keep the dirt/dust down. Especially now that all of the walls (planked cypress) are up.

Thanks. :D


:homereat:
 
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