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Rock Grower
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1969 Ford 4000 Diesel, Power steering is Leaking in 2 places so I want to rebuild it but I'm finding conflicting information and parts. My tractor does not have a fluid reservoir, and the service manual show that it should have one and the ram is different. The parts manual shows other styles of rams but none for my model.

The Pressure line originally followed the return line but some one changed it to a hose.
I don't think a reservoir is supposed to be on one with this model of P.S. pump but not sure?

Also cant find a part number for a rebuild kit, any help?
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Hello OMF,

See attached parts diagram. The cylinder illustrated in the little box on bottom looks like yours, and the pump illustrated in the little box on top also looks like yours. The pump has its own self-contained reservoir.

Do you know the manufacture date of your 4000?
 

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Rock Grower
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello OMF,

See attached parts diagram. The cylinder illustrated in the little box on bottom looks like yours, and the pump illustrated in the little box on top also looks like yours. The pump has its own self-contained reservoir.

Do you know the manufacture date of your 4000?
its a 1969 other than that not sure of manufact date
 

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It looks a bit wet at the front end of the cylinder, are you sure it is not oil coming from there and runs along the underside of the cylinder?

If not:
It might be the bolts holding the valve body together that need tightening.

or get new seals:
Check out HarveyW:s listing, you will need:
#4 Part number: 129979
#5.1 Part number: 64779
#7A (2 of those) Part number: 9672548
#29.1 Part number: 82847680

Check the ball (has nothing to do with leaking outside, but can be worn), #30, as well (OD 6.53 mm in the listing is wrong, it is 1/4", 6.35 mm).

Edit:
Get the Shop Manual here:
https://www.tractorforum.com/manuals/ford-2000-3000-4000-3-cyl-1-65-12-74-shop-manual.6/

Pump: Paragraph 12, Page 9 Starts with "On models with integral pump..."
Valve body: Paragraph 43, Pages 18-19
 

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Hi,
Am working on a ‘67 Ford 4000 power steering welded cylinder that’s leaking at the ram seal.
I gently cut the first weld at the control end and successfully separated it, as marked in yellow.
I believe I now need to cut the weld at the front end of the cylinder, marked in blue.
Question: if I separate the cylinder where marked in blue, I’ll want to weld it back together there. Is there an assembly process that will prevent the ram seal from getting too hot during welding? Or can I replace the seal without cutting the weld?
Thank you,
Craig
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Very interesting to see how it looks inside. Are you planning to renew the piston seals as well, or why did you cut the cylinder?
Is it possible for you to pull out the piston backwards and show it in a picture?
Is there a bushing in the end for the rod, or is there only the seals there?

I attach parts from the Shop Manual that shows how you renew the rod seals. There is no need to cut anything in order to do that job.
 

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The piston seal is a single ring, like an engine would have. Reminds me of a weed eater aluminum piston with a single ring.
It is interesting to see how the cylinder manufacturer used an internal sleeve in order to actuate the ram. I’ll send a picture of the disassembled unit shortly.
The reason I took it apart is because the local New Holland Service Center said they have a seal kit. Does seem like a welded cylinder was not intended to be overhauled, but replaced.
Will know more tomorrow when I return this back to the Service Center.
 

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Should have mentioned that the piston is secured to the ram by a castle nut & cotter key.
I surmise that what ruined the pressure seal is the fact that it was embedded with blue paint.
Will inspect their seals at the service center to verify this unit can be rebuilt with the seals they have.
 

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That will be fun to watch. I have been wondering about how the flow gets to the top, and thought of a thick-walled cylinder with a channel. This solution is very clever. Thank you for the information.

As said, the rod seals are renewable from the end. No need to cut the cylinder. What the manual means, is that the unit is not servicable when it comes to piston or rod problems.
 

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I asked about a possible rod bushing in the cylinder end, because when I renewed the seals I wondered if a worn bushing could give to much play and destroy the seals. I thought the rod was a bit sloppy when the seals where out, and could not determine if there was a bushing in there or not.
 

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The picture you posted is perfect. Read the article in the link above that stated the cylinder was welded together. Am curious to know if he cut the weld at the back of the cylinder like I did. When I took the parts back to the Service Center, he had a set of seals, and am waiting for them to call me back...assuming the want the front weld cut also. Here’s a picture of the ram & piston. Note the steel ring seal.
 

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From the illustration, looks like I didn’t have to cut the weld. Only pull the scraper out, which would reveal the snap ring and the rest of items 5 thru 10
 

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Thank you for the picture. That was a simple piston, but it works.

No, he did not cut the cylinder. You do not need to cut anything to be able to renew the rod seals. Read the pdf I posted. You do the job from the front. A pick to pull the scraper. Pliers for the snap ring and the rest comes out with the pick.

Check the shoulder on the rod for burrs, dress the edge with a file if necessary.
Put some electrical tape over the threads and over the edge, to make a smooth surface for the seal and scraper.
 
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