Tractor Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, as some of you know, nothing dulls a chain saw chain like frozen wood. I have two saws, that the chains are getting pretty dull. I have been feild sharping them with a file, but looks like they are due for a REAL sharping. What do you guy that cut wood al the time do? Sould I replace the chain, get the equpment to do it myself, or send them out to be done? Where is a good place to get chain? anything on the web? If I send them out, who does this kind of work? Thanks for any help. My workhorse saw, an old Homelite superXLauto with a 20" bar is the worse. Starting to vear a bit when cuting. Guess I am not that good at sharping them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,567 Posts
Paul, I just keep sharpening my saw chain with the file until it is worn down to nothing. In my opinion, having it sharpened at some place like my local hardware store where I purchased the saw with their sharpening machine a $2 a pop is just not worth it. I noticed not difference between the machine sharpened and my file sharpened chain cutting ability. I usually end up sharpening every 2nd - 4th tank of gas when cutting firewood. Much more when hitting !%#!$#^)*(&^@! fence wire embedding in the wood! :argh: :argh: :argh: This year I cut about 15 cords of firewood and I still cannot justify the cost of a sharpener. The guy I cut with has one and he uses it. It does a real nice job sharpening but it is in the shop and not practical in the field. He ends up sharpening with a file more times than not as well. The clamp on type sharpeners are junk in my opinion. I have one and never use it anymore. The professional type sharpeners require removal of the chain. Not very practical either. If you want a periodic machine sharpened chain; most places like Coop or your local chainsaw dealer have a sharpener and will do it for a few bucks. If you are a tool/gadget junkie :

This is the unit my cutting partner has:


Oregon Bench Mount Grinder
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
Well to be honest, I would use a file and keep the chain touched up, and if it gets to the point of needing to be put back in top shape have it resharpened by a sharpening service. ABout every 6 or 8 file sharpenings I have mine redone on a machine. I cut wood all year around, while I don;t have the frozen wood anymore to contend with, I do have a lot of wood thats pretty dirty. I stay away from saw chains sold in places like wal mart and builder supply stores expecially those that are touted as being hard chrome plated for long wear. Commercial chain is not chrome plated, and it will outlast a consumer grade chain by a long shot, but you will have to go to a place that sells commercial grade chain. Lots of commercial grade chain does not have all the safety features in it like consumer chain does, so just be aware of that. Commercial grade chain will outcut and last longer than consumer grade will. There is a place called Baileys on the internet that sells their own brand of chain named Woodsman. Its some super grade chain, and is actually made by CArlton Chain which is a spinoff of Oregon chain. Carlton chain is some top grade chain, and IMHO better than Oregon brand. So don;t be afraid of the house brand Woodsman as its actually Carlton brand.

Learning to file a chain is not hard, but its easier if you have a person that knows how to do it show you first hand. I have never owned a machine to sharpen chain and with the amount of wood I have cut and continue to cut, I still can;t justify its use, when a file is fine. Folks usually keep forcing a dull chain to cut, which makes it harder to put back in shape. Check your bar for wear as well as your drive sprocket or spur. If you have a symetrical style bar, flip it over each time you sharpen the chain. If you went threw 2 or more chains already odds are you need a new drive spur or sprocket. Check and see if a rim type spur can be installed on yur saw if your in need of a new drive sprocket. They last a lot longer than any sprocket, and chain will not jump off as easy if the bar gets in a twist. When replacement of a rim is needed its only about $3.00 for a new rim instead of $20 + for a new sprocket.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well, I got a new sharpener tonight I will see how it goes. It is one of the clamp on ones, and seems like half the people like them, the other half says there junk. Well, I guess I will give it a shot. Think one of my problems it that I have been fileing the cutters, but not filing the hight at all. Well, I will give it a shot, and see how it works.

Now as for sprokets and chain. My one saw is only about two years old, and does not have much use. It is a Chraftsman with a 14" bar. I got it for the wife to use, becouse it has all the safty feactures and my Homelite has none. The chain and stuff is REAL cheap for this. The Homelite on the other had is tough. I had to have a chain cut for it last time, and it was pricy. I also don;t know if I can still get drive sprokets for it. It is probably a mid, to late 70's Homelite super XL auto. Anyone know if parts are still getable?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,693 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well had a chance to sharpen the chains. The new gide I got worked OK. A bit of a pain to set up, but once it was done it worked good. I can see how once you get used to how the gide works, hand filing will be a lot faster. But this gide does show how to do it. Cut good when I was done. Nice and stright, and good chips. Looks like I will get a little more life out of them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
You should be able to get sprockets, bars and such normal wear tiype items for just about any saw made. Oregon and Carlton has a catalog that has tons of sprockets and chanis and bars etc listed. Give Baileys a call or MAsdams and I would bet, they have one in stock. Another good source is Eagle USA, its a local owned business here in Alabama but they deal all over the north american continent and have some good prices and stock of these type items. Since you are going to have to chage the sprocket, why not check and see if there is a rim type drive listed for your saw. I have the major parts catalalogs for Carlton and Oregon, so if you can give me a bit more info on your saw I can look up your numers for a sprocket assembly or rim drive .

Sprockets on most folks saws seem to be neglected as they are usually trouble free, but have reached their service life long before they really give a headache. It donb;t take too much wear on a sprocket to start to prematurely stretch a chain out of shape, as once it is worn the chain pitch is affected so it starts things going down hill pretty quick.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top