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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a used cub cadet. The battery was week, so bought a new battery (340cc) nothing but a click. So bought a new starter. Nothing but a click. The only other thing I can think of is solenoid. But I don’t know anything about these mowers. Any ideas ?
 

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Welcome to the forum. I'd check the ground and cable connections before you spend any more money on it. The connections may seem fine but a good clean up and reconnect may help.
 

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Clean up ground & cable connections as Bill recommended.

Often times, a "click" is due to a defective safety switch. The seat switch is used most and is often the culprit. Try putting a jumper wire in the seat switch connector plug.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clean up ground & cable connections as Bill recommended.

Often times, a "click" is due to a defective safety switch. The seat switch is used most and is often the culprit. Try putting a jumper wire in the seat switch connector plug.
I just noticed the seat sensor wires are not connected. Hadn’t thought of that. But when I connected them again. Still nothing
 

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Seat switches are a PITA (pun intended)😁. Two types.... Two-post & 4-Post. Two-post are almost never tied into the starting circuit. 95% of the time they are tied to ground to kill the magneto(s), if you pull a Benny Hill and fall off the seat. 4-post safety switches are usually tied into ground for both the magneto kill and to provide the ground circuit for the starter relay. Generally speaking, if you have either a 4-post seat switch, or a 4-post brake/clutch switch, you'll have a 4-post starter relay. A 4-post starter relay gets its ground at one of the small spade terminals (doesn't matter which one). A 3-post starter relay gets it's ground through the mounting legs. The OEMs almost always use that second small spade on a 4-post relay to tie the safety switches into the cranking circuit.

Usual scenario for cranking with a 4-post starter relay..... Brake/Clutch depressed, PTO switch off, and sometimes butt in seat (but 95% of the time, only if it has a 4-post seat switch). From my experience, the safety switch that fails most often on a conventional mower, and prevents it from cranking, is the brake/clutch switch. It's almost always mounted under the left side floorboard and is exposed to the moisture, debris, and corrosion generated by the deck operating.

My usual troubleshooting steps for a "no crank", with a 4-post relay, is to use a DVOM(test light) to see which post has 12VDC with the key in the spring-loaded start position (No power -- Problem is coming from the key switch). Then pull the wire off the other small spade and run a jumper wire with alligator clips from that terminal to the battery negative terminal. If it cranks, it's either the brake/clutch switch, or the ground circuit in the PTO switch. If you don't want to mess with it further, put a permanent jumper wire between the spade and the mounting bolt on one of the starter relay legs. The electric PTO switch will still work (engage)....

You've just by-passed ALL of the safety switches in the cranking circuit. Worst case scenario is that it will crank with the PTO engaged and the trans in gear (if it's not hydro-static drive.... Your 1500 CC is a hydro drive)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Seat switches are a PITA (pun intended)😁. Two types.... Two-post & 4-Post. Two-post are almost never tied into the starting circuit. 95% of the time they are tied to ground to kill the magneto(s), if you pull a Benny Hill and fall off the seat. 4-post safety switches are usually tied into ground for both the magneto kill and to provide the ground circuit for the starter relay. Generally speaking, if you have either a 4-post seat switch, or a 4-post brake/clutch switch, you'll have a 4-post starter relay. A 4-post starter relay gets its ground at one of the small spade terminals (doesn't matter which one). A 3-post starter relay gets it's ground through the mounting legs. The OEMs almost always use that second small spade on a 4-post relay to tie the safety switches into the cranking circuit.

Usual scenario for cranking with a 4-post starter relay..... Brake/Clutch depressed, PTO switch off, and sometimes butt in seat (but 95% of the time, only if it has a 4-post seat switch). From my experience, the safety switch that fails most often on a conventional mower, and prevents it from cranking, is the brake/clutch switch. It's almost always mounted under the left side floorboard and is exposed to the moisture, debris, and corrosion generated by the deck operating.

My usual troubleshooting steps for a "no crank", with a 4-post relay, is to use a DVOM(test light) to see which post has 12VDC with the key in the spring-loaded start position (No power -- Problem is coming from the key switch). Then pull the wire off the other small spade and run a jumper wire with alligator clips from that terminal to the battery negative terminal. If it cranks, it's either the brake/clutch switch, or the ground circuit in the PTO switch. If you don't want to mess with it further, put a permanent jumper wire between the spade and the mounting bolt on one of the starter relay legs. The electric PTO switch will still work (engage)....

You've just by-passed ALL of the safety switches in the cranking circuit. Worst case scenario is that it will crank with the PTO engaged and the trans in gear (if it's not hydro-static drive.... Your 1500 CC is a hydro drive)
Thank you very much. Very helpful. I like the Benny Hill reference too
 
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