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Discussion Starter #1
I am recovering from major surgery and am restricted to lifting objects under 10 lbs. My wife has a hard time lifting full 5 gallon cans up to fill our Legacy. I know I can just fill 'em halfway in the first place but that makes more trips to the gas station or I have to buy more cans. Has anyone seen a battery powered pump for transferring fuel from can to vehicle? I see the battery powered kerosene pumps transfer about a gallon a minute. Maybe that's what I need if I can't find anything better.
Thanks, Hutch
 

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get some one at the gas place to lift it in and leave it in the car/truck and just use a hose to pore the gas in it what ever toy use it 4 thats the cheapest way
 

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Be careful with anything that can spark around gas! You may see it for kero but that's not as flammable as gas fumes. Ask a friend or neighbor to help, don't do anything to add your health issues. Take care of yourself and don't over do it, all those things that seem so important will be waiting when you feel better.
 

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Hutch001b….Be Careful

Battery powered pumps for kerosene may not be safe for gasoline.
Gasoline is much more flammable then kerosene and when gasoline
vapors are exposed to any form of sparks (like brushes in a DC motor)
they can explode.

If you must transfer gasoline use a manual pump or siphon.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We just went up and filled the cans half way. She can handle that. I actually have a couple of the manual kerosene pumps around here. I was just thinking that I had seen a gasoline safe pump somewhere. Thanks for the replies, Hutch
 

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I know they make electric pumps that are compatible with gasoline, but the ones I'm thinking of would be too small. They might pump 1/2 gallon per minute.

You could check Mcmaster Carr (i think its www.mcmastercarr.com). They would quite possibly have one.

Regards,
Greg
 

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There are 12 volt electric gasoline pumps with explosion proof motors but they are expensive, there are also hand operated fuel pumps both are for drums or fuel storage tanks like heavy equipment operators and maintenance men have on there trucks and run in the hundreds of dollars if not thousands.

There are also some hand operated “transfer pumps” hose to hose, rotary and piston operated at WW Grainger, again in the hundreds of dollars

There are some other options offered for a regular 5 gal. Gas can, but nothing electric that I have seen, just manual hand pump operation.

Where? Northern Tool (HAN-D-PUMP, and PETRO PUMP w/can) and Tractor Supply (HAN-D-PUMPT, spelling??? that is how it is listed on there site) both Companies have hand operated gas can pumps for 5 gal. Plastic cans.

They replace the spout on the can and have a hose and handle for around 10 bucks. I have seen one report that said they pump about 1 gal per minute, I can not in any way recommend them for, I have never used one and am just pointing them out incase you have not seen them. They look a bit cheap, and takes a bit of effort to operate, but may work just fine. For 10 bucks it may be worth checking out.

SAFTY MODE ON

Just a note of caution: Some folks do not know this, plastic can store static charge on it's surface, My wife shocks her self every time she slides out of the car then touches the car due to the seats, dash, door handles, and carpet. There have been cases where this static charge has started a fuel fire while filling these plastic gas cans if they are not set on the ground, and the person doing the filing has not discharged the static off their person. One case was a man (made the news here) filling 4 or 5 cans in his truck bed with them sitting on the bed liner (Insulated electrically), as he filled the cans a charge built up on the surface of the cans that were not grounded and jumped a spark from the can to the grounded filler nozzle when he moved the nozzle to fill another can. This situation has also caused fuel fires when filling a cars tank in past years where they are using more and more plastics on car fuel tank filler tubes.

Just the friction of the fuel flow across a non-grounded piece of plastic can build up a charge on the surface and in time it will jump a spark. Always set gas cans on the ground when filling and make sure to discharge any static that may be on you by touching the ground or a grounded object before filling them.

Safety mode off
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just trying to make life easier on the wife. I can't even lift the half-full cans for another 6 weeks. I've seen the hand pumps.
As far as the safety issues, we always set the cans out on the ground and ground the nozzles to the cans. Personally, I never believed the warning about using cellphones while fueling but, at one of our plants a maintenance man went into a hazardous area with fumes and received a cell call which ignited the fumes. I was paying for gas one day recently when a customer pulled up, got out talking on the cell and tried to pump gas. Clerk kept telling him he wasn't turning on the pump until he hung up the phone and the guy is standing there screaming at the building. He finally drove off without gas. How is it that we survived the last several hundred years without cell phones? Now people can't back out of the driveway before they get on the blasted things and won't hang up for anything. Oh well, that's another topic. Hutch
 
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