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I have an old washed out asphalt base on my driveway from the road to the back edge of the house --- about 200' or so in this area about 10' wide.... currently have a layer of slag over the driveway and around back (driveway curves around back of house and expanded to about 20-25' wide) of slag. The area in the back is under a canopy of a large live oak tree and while I know this area is already compacted with slag and vehicle traffic, wouldn't the ashpalt really damage the roots of the tree and cause problems since it is under the dripline of the tree and the asphalt will be non-porous??? (trunk is about 10-15' front edge of driveway)

In any case, think he was quoting about 2" of asphalt using the gravel on the sides (for support) and included all grading work somewhere in the neighborhood of $0.85/sq ft. What ?'s should I ask about this job? Type of asphalt, roller, tapping down the edges? Anything else and what do you think about the area under the tree? I think it might be best to leave this in place with just the slag... Any tips, insight or ideas?


Thanks
Andy
 

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If it is in the drip line of the trees, it will hurt them, maybe not enough to kill them, but it's not good. The price of $.85 is very good! Up in my neck of the woods, a dollar a sq. ft. is considered a bargain, but that is for 3". I wouldn't go less than 3", but I have to worry about frost and cold and stuff like that. Have you considered doing your apron in paving brick, or precast concrete pavers? It is labor intensive, but allows drainage (sort of), lasts a very long time, looks good, and is homeowner repairable.
 

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Worry

I would worry more about what the trees will do to the asphalt then the other way. If the area has been driveway right along the trees have already adapted themselves to it. Find out if they are going to use a basecoat , finish coat proceedure. I agree with Joe 3 inches is the thinnest I would go.
 

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Yep three inches is best, and not for cold in the south but mainly to keep it from cracking apart from heat. I have seen a lot of new drives put in using 2" thick asphalt and they simply do not last unless it was put over a hellaceous base of slag on some very stable soil.........

Me I have a clay gravel driveway, so whenever I get to wanting a fresh look I just scrape it down again:D Clay gravel here seems to last forever, not the prettiest by any means but if yu get some good clay gravel it will be there for a long long time without mud or washouts.

As to the tree as previously posted it is probably adapted to compacted soil in that area already, but with it being a live oak I would still not chance it...Pavers or brick driveway blocks seem like a good alternative. they will float with frosts (not a problem in your area) and they drain and provide a suitable substance to go over tree drip line area. They are easily replaced if damaged and will last probably as long as or longer than asphalt. Different colors or patterns can be made usually at no additonal costs if you do a little homework beforehand. Lowes and Home Depot has them and I am sure they can be obtained in large quanities at a lower price. Pavers are what I will use one day whenever I decide to make a new driveway..........but that clay gravel just seems to last.........
 

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Sorry Andy,
I misread your original post. Somehow I got in my mind you were just doing the entrance area, typically called the apron in my neck of the woods. For the whole driveway, it is a lot of labor to lay brick pavers, or precast concrete pavers, but the finished product really looks sharp. Plus with precast concrete, you have several choices of color to compliment your house and/or landscaping.
 

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I spent a little more time pondering your driveway and have you considered tar and stone chip? It works out to about $.15 to $.20 a sq. ft in PA and by picking different stone chips to use, you can vary the color. It is not as durable as asphalt, but it can be renewed every 3 or 4 years as needed at a lesser cost.
 
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