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Discussion Starter #1
I am really leaning towards Ag tires on a JD 4310 with FEL for the increased grab ability. I know they tear up grass, but I won't be driving on grass. My dealer says that they will pop off when using a loader because they are thinner than the industrial R4's. Has anyone ever had this happen to them? Is it really necessary to get industrial tires when using a loader?
 

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If you have concerns about traction............get the R-1 ag bar tires. R-4 industrial tires do have a much more rigid tire casing than the R-1 ag tires. HOWEVER, the R-4's do not perform well in really soft, mucky, muddy conditions. They are near worthless on snow and ice. The R-4's are a good compromise between turf tires and the R-1 ag tires. OH YES........the R-1 ag tires will leave SERIOUS marks on your lawn to take that under advisement. The R-1 ag tires will work just fine with your FEL. The dealer is blowing a bunch of smoke up your rear end telling you the tires will pop off. That is BS! Farmers have been using R-1 ag tires with FEL's for years. You will also notice that few if any farmers use R-4 ag tires. I suspect the deal may not want to switch out the R-4 tires that are likely installed on the machine you want to buy. Most of the 4WD tractors come with R-4's since they are a good multipurpose tire. I have them on my 4410 but I use my tractor in the yard. In any case, get the tires you want. Save a few bucks in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking this is smoke too. Thanks for the confirmation. I was thinking why would a major tractor company put inadequate tires on tractors that they WANT you to buy a loader with. I did find some specs for the 300CX loader and in the specs they have a list of approved tires for loader use. Both sizes of ag tires are listed. I am still interested to see if this has happened to anyone, or if anyone knows of this happening.

Now, about that second size of R1. Is it worth the couple hundred $ upcharge to get an inch or so wider tire? I am thinking this might be good, since I really don't want to buy another set of rims and tires after I spend my fortune on the tractor.
 

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In my opinion it is usually best to get as much rubber as is possible on your tractor. I think the extra money spent is worth it. In your case the R-1 ag tires will give you the ability to turn the wheels around to adjust the wheel width to give more stability if needed. R-4 tires and wheels do not allow this. I say go large! :D ;)
 

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I Run a

John Deere 4600 with 460 loader and clam bucket. With my machine I farm, do a ton of concrete tear-outs for my business, load trucks,handle logs for my sawmill, pull over a dozen attatchments, do back-hoe work. Well you get the picture, this machine gets worked and worked hard. At this time I have over 1100 hours on it with very very few problems. The tractor has power beyond , aux. scv's mid mount for the clam bucket, and rear mount SCV's for my stump grinder, hydraulicly it has all the outlets available for it. In fact the yellow model compact that Deere makes now the 110 has the same outlets.
Now lets get to tires, The machine has R-4's made by Titan and I am quite happy with them. Traction is not really a big problem unless I am in the wet clay elbows deep. The one thing I have never done with this machine is call anybody to pull me out. The R-4's will be hard to steer if you are trying to climb up out of ruts, but that is what split rear brakes are for. I have had flats I think five. All were caused by reenforcement wire in broken concrete, I figure it is part of the price of doing the kind of business I do. Also I have popped the beads on the front tires a few times. Ussually when that happens I am carrying something heavy in the mud trying to turn. There is an easy way to get them to remount, I use a nylon rachet tie down centered up on the tread and cranked down tight. That is after I clean the mud off the tire bead and the rim. That last one is real important, Ask me how I know that. I have also invested in a good plugger tool and keep it in the truck, and I have never had a plug fail.
Another advantage R-4's have over Ag style is they don't tend to dig to China, but they deffinately do not clear themselves as well.
I hope my windy explanation helps. In the end I guess it all depends on what you like or what you want to do with the machine.
 

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Tractor Lover
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I think it's all smoke...I have ag tires on my tractor and have never had a problem when running the loader...They clean themselves when in mud and get great traction on snow and ice without chains.
 
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