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AFTER MARKET FENDERS

Discussion in 'Ford / New Holland' started by Graysonr, Dec 27, 2017.

  1. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Does anyone have experience purchasing aftermarket or salvaging sheet metal for older tractors? Does anyone sell truly faithful reproductions? Original style brackets, same heavy gauge skins, etc. I have what are probably the best OEM fenders for a 68 Ford 2000 available in my state but they are 50 years old. While this is a "working" tractor, I am trying to eradicate the abuse levied by the original owner, who was apparently a heavy drinker.

    The right side fender is only suffering from age with rust running out from between fender skin and the bracket. Paint shop says that once started, this will continue regardless of what is done to the visible areas of the fender assembly.

    My left side fender is in tougher shape due to a previous owner being careless with operating the tractor at some point. The fender is actually bent forward and inward at the rear as well as the rear curve being misshapen as well as the edge wrap being shoddily repaired. My intention is to get the tool box sand blasted to place on a new fender and reconstruct the tubing to carry the electric wire for the fender mounted warning light (already restored).

    Any advice is appreciated.
     
  2. sixbales

    sixbales Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2011
    Howdy Graysonr,

    The fenders on my 3600 were rusting through where the brackets were spot welded to the skin. There is no paint between the bracket and skin, so it is prone to rust. I drilled out the spot welds on the brackets, cleaned & painted the brackets, and bolted new skins on them. Used 1/4" stainless steel bolts. Worked well, but the skins are rusting 10+ years later, especially the right fender, where my sweaty arm rests on it. Rust never sleeps.
     
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  3. Tractor Beam

    Tractor Beam ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIELS Staff Member

    Jan 25, 2010
    Priest River, Idaho
    That's the rumor! Couldn't you put some neoprene between the bracket and the skin to prevent moisture entry? This of course after yet another reset of new skin and all! (laughing)
     
    Graysonr likes this.
  4. Ultradog

    Ultradog Active Member

    137
    Feb 27, 2005
    I buy nearly all of my parts from yesterdays tractors. Have purchased 3 sets of 3000 style fenders from them over the years. They are probably Tisco products. They are good, heavy fenders and are pretty much identical with OEM.
    You can buy just the skins and bolt them to your brackets or buy them complete with brackets. I bought the complete ones twice as there's no monkeying around with brackets. The last set I bought the skins and bolted them to my 4400 brackets because the spacing where they bolt to the axles is wider.
     
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  5. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Thank you sixbales, tractor beam, and Ultradog. Your advice based on experience is invaluable. Seems no one sells just the brackets, so perhaps the best long term solution is to remove the skins from a pair of OEM fenders, sand blast and paint the brackets, and then bolt on new, painted skins.
     
  6. Tractor Beam

    Tractor Beam ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIELS Staff Member

    Jan 25, 2010
    Priest River, Idaho
    I really hate sandblasting steel if you can help it, because the surface pitting just predisposes the metal to rust in and of itself, but if you already have rust to begin with, then I'd blast the brackets only where there is the rust, then have someone who does bedliner, coat them. I did turboliner for a time, and those products are insanely tough! Maybe even have the spot that rusts through on the skins bedlinered then paint, in addition to the neoprene, and you should be fine forever!
     
    Graysonr likes this.
  7. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Yes tractor beam, I agree on the durability of the spray on bed liner. I had this put on a pickup years ago and never had a scratch in it or rust under it. Bought an '84 Mercury that had a similar coating factory applied up to the first contour line on doors, fenders, and rockers. Looked new at 12 years of age. Had not thought of putting it on the tractor, but would be an ideal coating for the inside of the fender brackets.....on the bottoms that sit on the axle as well for that matter.
     
  8. Tractor Beam

    Tractor Beam ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIELS Staff Member

    Jan 25, 2010
    Priest River, Idaho
    Yup! Just have it applied to those areas to hold the cost down, then paint the rest yourself. If you do have someone apply the bedliner product, just have them shoot it smooth without the pebble finish. I accomplished the pebble finish by pointing the gun up toward the ceiling and tapping the trigger so that the mist fell on the coat and set. If you skip the pebble finish and go smooth, it'll be easier to paint over and blend in to your regular paint job.
     
    Graysonr likes this.
  9. deerhide

    deerhide Retired Canadian

    I used shiny black, rattle can stone guard on the inside of the fenders and under the hood of every new MF we sold back in the 70's-80's.
     
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  10. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Ok, lucked into some oem style fenders with original style fender brackets at RAparts.com got them on order. Not sure if they're in primer or Ford gloss gray, but if that's primer, it's the shiniest primer I ever saw! Either way, at the price, I won't be disappointed. (Boy was I wrong! The RAParts fenders were not usable in the end. Incorrect bolt hole spacing and the fender brackets improperly shaped caused the fenders lean inward away from the wheels. In the end, had to return them.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2018 at 5:30 PM
  11. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Fenders back from paint shop.JPG Good thing I bought the fenders from RAParts Inc. thru Amazon. When they arrived, they were packed in a cardboard carton with no padding and the outer rim took a bad hit and ding on the end curve. It was returned at no cost to me and a new one shipped also at no cost to me as is Amazon's new policy with 3rd party sellers. So finally got them out on the weekend for paint and got them back tonight. Installing the right one is straight forward. The left one is gonna be a challenge to add the electrical conduit all the way to the dash cluster.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2018 at 9:38 PM
  12. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Rt Fender Aftermarket.JPG Rt fender bent inward.JPG OK...live and learn. Oh, and btw, I am disappointed in the RAParts fenders! The RAParts ford fenders are problematic. First off, Ford used a special bolt (like a carriage bolt, but the shoulder under the round head was only deep enough to accommodate a square hole in the fender bracket). Ford wants $31 each for those bolts, and they're not long enough to accommodate adding a stabilizer bar under the axle. the RAParts fenders have a round hole for the fender bolts. On my 3 cylinder 2000, the fender bolt holes on the axle are 4 3/4 inch center to center. The holes on the RAParts fenders are 5" center to center. So after honing out the inside edge of one of the fender bolt holes, I was able to mount the right fender, only to find it does not stand up straight, but leans away from the wheel at about a 5 degree angle. Not Cool! I'm going to hone the hole in the left fender and sit it in place to see if it also is going to lean away from the wheel before I continue on getting the light and tool box mounted to the left fender and running the conduit for the light circuit while I figure how to make the right fender stand up straight.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2018 at 12:51 PM
    sixbales, FredM and Tractor Beam like this.
  13. Tractor Beam

    Tractor Beam ENGLISH SPRINGER SPANIELS Staff Member

    Jan 25, 2010
    Priest River, Idaho
    Can you use flex conduit? I'm speaking of the water tight sort. I assume this is for the lights?
     
  14. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Yes, for the light and I shouldn't be so fussy. I "think I remember" seeing wiring to rear lights running in metal tubing alongside the tractor case on some new Fords in the 60's. I have aluminum tubing "in the mail" with a tubing bender and swaging tool in hand. This 2000 actually had the tubing still in place in the left rear fender. I think flex tubing or even plastic tubing would eventually sag and (again, I shouldn't be so fussy) I think that would spoil the effect.
    I've just elongated the bolt hole in the left fender to fit the ford fender bolt spacing and fitted the left fender temporarily to see if it was also going to lean away from the wheel...and it does. Gotta figure a way to get the fenders to stand upright.....each is leaning 2 to 3 inches inward at the top. Thinking maybe a wedge under inner side of fender bracket? The only other option I see at the moment is to reshape the fender bracket angles, which would probably end up warping the skins. I've plenty of time to think as we have a thunderstorm quickly approaching with a cold front, so outside will be ugly until Sunday.
     
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  15. sixbales

    sixbales Well-Known Member

    May 17, 2011
    Howdy Grayson,

    I think that shimming the fenders would be the way to go. Maybe use epoxy on the shims to ensure they don't move once you've got them the way you want them.
     
  16. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Thanks sixbales, that's what I've decided to try first. It's non-destructive and should work, just a matter of getting the thickness right.
     
    FredM likes this.
  17. Graysonr

    Graysonr Registered User Supporting Member

    224
    Mar 31, 2017
    Thanks sixbales and tractorbeam for your inputs. I thought the leaning fender situation over through the evening and when I woke this morning, I realized I'd made the decision to not continue "jury rigging" the RAParts fenders. Shimming the inside edge of the fender bracket properly would have required another tapered shim under the bolt heads as well. Real machine shop work......enough is enough.
    Two weeks to get 2 non dented fenders here, a week for painting and curing time for the painting, cutting a slot in the fender bracket for the lighting conduit....I set up the return of the fenders through Amazon this morning and then went to the New Holland parts counter and ordered a pair from them.
    Lesson learned. At first sight of the new fenders, I will measure the bolt hole pattern and immediately upon returning home with them, do a test fitting on the tractor before sending them out for paint.