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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, the head financial officer has approved the request for a new chain saw with a $350.00 limit (could push $400.00). The old Crapsman crapped out after 20 years and the problems of it I do not want to repeat. This old one never was a very good one but it got the job done. I went to the box stores and Sears today but I was not impressed with the cheap a$$ junk I saw. So all you great guys give it to me good and tell me what you think I should get. Oh one thing no box stores for me only outdoor power equipment dealers need apply.:smoking: The Craftsman tossed a rod and soaked me in gas-oil.:tractorsm Lucky for me it did not start a fire.:cheers:
 

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I hear you about the cheap saws. Got a two year old Craftsman, and it looks like it is 20. Works OK for it's use. Mostly just limming, and the small stuff. My old Homelite is over 20years old, and still looks like new. Runs AWSOME also. When and if it ever dies, I will be looking for a GOOD saw. they are worth the money.
 

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Here is a link to a saw in your price range.
Jody

saw
 

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Strongly agree with the link Jody posted. Those are the two exact make and models I was going to suggest. Stihl makes great equipment. I have a Stihl O-66 (now called the MS-66), FS-450K, SR-400, and BG-85. They all work great and as advertised. The O-66 I have had for about 10 years and it is still running great. I highly recommend them. I started off with a Homelite Super 2 chainsaw and after watching how a Stihl cut I got the O-66 and was kicking myself for not buy it sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was looking at the Stihl and JD websites and weight is not important but I am somewhat impressed by the Stihl MS250C and the John Deere CS52. I am leaning towards the JD because of the warranty 2 year compared to the warranty on the Stihl 1 year. I jsut haven't decided or if I just keep hunting and see what other recommendations folks have.
 

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Jody,

Thanks for posting my link. The wood pile in the thread is now about 3 times as big. The MS250C really works well.

Michael,

If you look seriously at the JD, check out the quality of the controls. The engine is Italian and is supposed to be pretty good. Don't know about service in the future. Also, you can get parts/service for a Stihl from any Stihl dealer, which I think are more numerious than JD dealers. (My Ag dealer which carries both Deere, their only tractor line, and the full Stihl product line has their JD saws and trimmers at blowout prices and they still have some left on the shelves).

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The ford New Holland (Stihl) and the JD dealers are across the freeway from each other less then 10 miles from my place. I guess a trip is in order. How about Husquarva, they used to be real good but they are all over the place in the box stores. Sears is out in my eyes for the terrible service nearest my home. (I know of that as I made Sears buy back a lemon push lawn mower) Ended up I just repaired my really old 2-stroke Lawnboy.
 

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Personally I like the makita, they bought out sach-dolmar, and to me are a really great saw. We're on our 5th and 6th ones now. I'd say we averaged around 1000-1200 cords of wood on each saw besides regular farm duty ( sharpening fence posts, clearing fence lines, and stuff like that).

I'm not a stihl fan, but like a husky even less! DON"T get the semi-pro husky,,,, JUNK!!!!!

Use hi octane gas, and good quality mixing oil, you'll be glad you did, cause you won't have to replace a piston each time you cut your winters wood.
 

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Here is another option. These saws are German made by Solo, VERY similar to Stihl and I think are made for Makita. Baileys has them on sale

Model B-36

I have never used one but they look like a nice saw and the price is right!
 

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I haven't seen one of those before, don't look bad, but I did notice "ocasional use",, bad sign.

I guess it depends on what you want to use it dor, but to me the pro saws are worth the extra$$, an occasional user should have it last his life time.

The makita saws we've got are the sachs-dolmar designs, also german made. We run the smallest pro model, I think 52cc, and tough as nails! I don't remember if ours have the 14 or 16" bar, but have cut a lot of hardwood that the bar wouldn't cut all the way to the middle from both sides, the cut into 4 foot lenghts to load and deliver. No problem, just another day.
 

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Couple other things..

"Closeout!" Everything has a product life but to buy something new that I know is at the end of it's life bothers me.

Who's gonna service it, and what about parts.

Maybe I'm just too skiddish on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well yesterday (Monday) I finally got out early enough before work and went to the dealers. Well I walked ou of the John Deere dealer, He tryed to upsale me into something I did not want. I then went to the New Holland (Stihl) dealer and he actually showed all the features and the safe operating of the Stihl model just like what Greg has and I was impressed and he was informed and answered all my questions on the Saw. I decided that the Stihl model 250C sduited my needs and fits the useage I plan for it. I walked out with the Saw, Case, files, a extra chain and the oils and gas can for just a tick under $400.00. I know I could have easily got a chainsaw cheaper but the dealer and post sales service is more important to me then anything else. I now am ready to get the trees that are on my fence and trim them and cut up the tree that fell in the middle of my pasture last month.
 

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Michael I'm glad to see you found a saw and a dealer thats there for you have fun with it and let us know how you like it.
:thumbsup:
Jody
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well I am happy with the chainsaw but I will not use it until I completely read the owners guide at least once and probably twice to make sure I understand the safe operating of the new chainsaw. I also have to get a better pair of gloves before I can get at the old tree in the pasture.:usa:
 

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Yes Stewart, the Chainsaw has the quick adjustment feature is on the side of the chainsaw. I was really surprised to see it and and it looks like it will be a nice added feature.:smoking:
 

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Originally posted by Michael
Yes Stewart, the Chainsaw has the quick adjustment feature is on the side of the chainsaw. I was really surprised to see it and and it looks like it will be a nice added feature.:smoking:
That is what I thought and was too lazy to bring up the Stihl site and be sure. I have the same saw without the quick adjustment. It is a cutting machine!!!! I havn't had any problems getting it started as long as you start it like they say to! Good luck and enjoy the saw, it is a good machine!:clap:
 

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Michael,

Congrats on your new saw! I think you're really going to like it.

I assume you have ear and eye protection, right? You should also consider a pair of chaps. They are about $65 but are cheaper than buying a new leg... seriously!

<img src=http://www.hpphoto.com/servlet/LinkPhoto?GUID=2c3d32b7-18a1-e843-5c5c-593f542a2fd1&size=>

I have been told by several people who are big Husky fans that they still use, and recommend, Stihl 2 cycle oil and bar oil. It's also all I use.

The "C" has the QCA on the side as well as the primer bulb and the cushioned starter handle, which are not on the standard 250. The QCA is a nice feature. Be sure to lift up on the bar tip when you adjust the chain tension. I have also found that after adjusting the chain by eye for correct "sag" on the bottom, a bit finer adjustment can be made. By pulling the chain across the top of the bar and SLIGHTLY adjusting the geared wheel on the adjuster, you will find a point where the chain friction drops about 25% but the chain still "sags" the right amount. It might be a bit looser, but not much and there is less drag for the engine to overcome.

Everytime you fill the gas tank, always fill the bar oil tank at the same time. Even if you run out of gas there will still be some oil in the bar oil tank, by design, so if you always fill both you will never run the bar dry.

Starting and gas, my experience:
http://www.tractorforum.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1622

(can't seem to get the link to work, so here's the text.)

"Octane rating for 2 stroke engines...

This subject has been debated on other forums, but I would like to share a first hand personal experience and get the Tractor Forum member's thoughts and comments.

First, for some reason, 2 cycle engines do not like me. The refuse to start easily and run right. I don't know why, but that is the way it has been.

Now as most of you know, I recently purchased a Stihl MS250C chainsaw. The manual states:

"Use mid-grade unleaded gasoline with a minimum octane rating of 89 (R+M/2). If the octane rating of the mid-grade gasoline in your area is lower, use premium unleaded fuel" (I am assuming 92 octane).

When I first got the saw, sure enough I had a hell of a time getting it to start. I had fresh fuel (89 octane) with the right mixture of top grade 2 cycle oil. I thought it was just that it was new and not "broken in" yet. I read and re-read the starting instructions in the manual. I watched the video at the Stihl website. Yes, I could finally get it started after about 20 pulls and 30 minutes of hard work. I talked to other people, took it back to the dealer and when they tried it, it started right away. Yep, I was not loved. Finally I rolled all the advice together and got to the point I could start the saw after about 10 pulls. I thought I had reached a new plateau of success and had broken the jinx. I should have stopped there....

I heard, on other forums, that higher octane gas would burn cooler, and I assumed increase the reliability and life of the engine. The Stihl manual even said to use it if necessary. So last week, when I needed more gas, I took my 2 1/2 gal tank to the local gas station, filled with exactly 2 gallons of fresh premium (92 octane) gas, mixed the exact amount of oil, filled the saw's tank and was ready to tackle the logs....

I pulled....and I pulled...and pulled...

10 times...20 times...30 times...over about an hours time. I smelled gas (flooded) so I took out the plug, dried it and put it back in.

I pulled...and I pulled...and pulled...

I actually got 2 water blisters and 1 blood blister from pulling (with leather gloves on)! Once the starter handle flew back into the saw and clipped my thumb, pinching a nerve. It's still a little numb.

Dog gone it!.......was not what came out of my mouth!

Sooooo...back to the dealer. I talked to my salesman and the service manager. The manager said he sends out all the small engine equipment they sell, not with 89 but with 87 octane gas. He said he would NOT at all recommend premium!

Back to the house, dump the full tank of 92 into my car, and filled up with exactly 2 gallons of 87 octane gas, exact mixture of oil. I dumped the saws gas tank, pumped the primer bulb to flush out the carb, filled the tank with the 87 mix and primed it. I put band-aids on my fingers under my gloves.

Full choke...1 pull...2 pulls, the engine fired once.

Half choke...1 pull...2 pulls, the engine started.

I was born again!!!!

From that time on, I can start that saw fresh with less than 5 pulls, EVERY time! If the saw is warm...2 pulls max!

OK, I am wearing out the leather on my gloves around the knuckle area every time I get ready to saw wood again. I am focusing on making longer pulls on the cord, as opposed to faster, shorter pulls. But I really have to believe the change in octane is my main salvation."

There are a lot of opinions, but my final method still works great for me. I also run a bit more oil than the normal. I put 3oz, rather than the 2.8oz normally recommended. The saw doesn't smoke, starts well and I feel the extra oild just give a bit more protection.

If I can do anything else for you, please let me know.

Greg
 

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I reaslly don't think you can go wrong with Husky, Stihl or Jonsereds. Jonsereds dealers are few and far between but its a good saw. Personally I prefer Husky, but i have Stihls as well. Husky and Stihl both make a mix of saws some good and some bad, so its really a coin toss unless you do some serious checking on satisfied customers. I do know a Husky even an older one vibrates less than a Stihl. I have some bad nerve damage in my left arm, and I can go about an hour maybe two hours tops with any sized Stihl before it gets to the point I can't handle it, but can go for quite a few hours with the Huskies.

I have a Husky Rancher 44 that is over 30 years old and still works and runs like a champ. I have a Stihl 028 which is over 20 or pretty close to it, and it too runs like a champ once I can get it started. (ignition /throttle /choke switch is messed up so half the time your trying to start it its on OFF) But its one fine saw. Older Homelites were fine, had a SUper XL, WIZ, and a ZIP and other than being extremely heavy they were fine saws and probably tops in their day. My newest ones are a Stihl 044 and 061 and Husky 272XP (2 of them) 372 and 345. Also have a couple of echo top handled saws as well as a Stilh 019 top handle. But, my all around best saw is a POULAN 3400, it is used the most especially in mud and dirty work like cutting cross ties and is always the only saw I ever will load out, and it refuses to die. Cranks one or two pulls and never misses a beat. I bought it new as a returned item back around 1982, for $75 and its been going strong ever since. Too bad the newer Poulans even the Poulan Pro series can't compare to this old saw.
 
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