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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New at this, so bear with me. I have two ride on mowers. I had the 1000 series Cadet. fuse.jpg mower.jpg Everytime I used it. Seemed I had to work on it. Plus it kept eating belts. The engine ran good. But last thing this mower started doing was. After riding and mowing for about a few minutes. It would blow the 20amp fuse. The other mower I have is a Craftsman Mower. This mower I had always liked and I had added all new matching tires and new transaxle and rebuilt the deck and all new OEM belts and at a time. A new 17.5 Briggs and Stratton engine. That engine had thrown a rod since then. So I have a rolling chassis with a blown engine. I didn't try to figure out why the cadet was blowing the 20amp fuse. I had removed the engine from the Cadet and it was pretty much plug and play at putting it in the craftsman. This mower cut really nice, even better than the Cadet. But after about five minutes of usage. The engine shut right down. The 20amp fuse had blown! Looking into trouble shooting for the electrical short. All of what I have found in my searches is the tests you would do for the electrical harness, the key switch, etc. But I don't need to check these. Whatever is shorting it out, a delayed shorting out. Has to be on the engine. I didn't reuse the wiring from the Cadet. I used the wiring that was on the Craftsman.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bad voltage regulator.
Is there a way to test it? I went through every wire and connection and inspected and cleaned every connection. Then I disconnected the power lines to the starter relay and one by one started plugging things together and with each connection I turned the key switch and I checked that 20 amp fuse. When I got to the voltage regulator. With the power lead (red) plugged in. The fuse was fine. When I plugged the double lined plugs together, the two black wires coming from the stator into the two yellow wire of the voltage regulator and turned the key switch. The fuse blew. How can I check the voltage regulator and how do I check the stator?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is there a way to test it? I went through every wire and connection and inspected and cleaned every connection. Then I disconnected the power lines to the starter relay and one by one started plugging things together and with each connection I turned the key switch and I checked that 20 amp fuse. When I got to the voltage regulator. With the power lead (red) plugged in. The fuse was fine. When I plugged the double lined plugs together, the two black wires coming from the stator into the two yellow wire of the voltage regulator and turned the key switch. The fuse blew. How can I check the voltage regulator and how do I check the stator?
I found a way to check everything. https://www.vanguardpower.com/conte...a/en_us/Files/FAQs/alternator_replacement.pdf hopefully this link is allowed.
 

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It's not a "regulator".... It's a RECTIFIER/regulator. The two black leads from the stator carry A/C voltage that pass into the 1/2 wave rectifier and come out as regulated D/C voltage.

Stator Lead test
1) VOM on Continuity - Neither wire should show continuity to Ground
2) Neither wire should show continuity to each other
3) VOM on A/C Voltage - One lead on each wire, with engine running. Should show a minimum of 28V A/C. At Full throttle, should be 35, or better

Regulated Lead (red wire)

1) VOM on D/C Voltage - Test only the red lead... Red lead on red wire -- Black lead to ground. Should show minimum of 13V D/C at idle. No more than 14.5V D/C at full throttle.

Continuity to ground on either stator wire, or continuity between wires.... Stator wiring shorted

Less than 28V A/C output.... Weak Stator

Zero, or less than 13V D/C out on red regulated wire... Bad rectifier/regulator

Everything checks out, but still blowing fuses after red wire is reconnected.... Short in red wire (charging circuit). Bad key switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll give this a try. But what has changed since my last posting is,... the fuse blows when I try to start it now. So I'll only be able to try some of the tests you pointed out.
 

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I would check the Stator as Bob suggests and if this checks out ok then replace the rectifier/regulator, if you didn't change over the ignition switch from the cub then the possibility of the two ignition switches having shorted out is at odds, -- is the cub engine a briggs like the Craftsman?, if it is and engine HP is fairly close, I was going to suggest to change the rectifier/regulator from the blown Craftsman to the Cub engine and try that.
 

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Fred makes a good point.... Ignition switches can look the same, and plug right up, but they're wired differently.

The Craftsman Harness will plug right into the engine harness, but it sounds like it's wired different at the back of the ignition switch plug.

To get an idea of how many different variations there are to ignition switches
Take a look at this chart and note how many variations there are to just a simple 5-prong switch.

https://www.lawnmowerpros.com/diy/index.php/lawn-mower-ignition-switch-by-terminal/
 

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Make sure you check out that ignition switch BEFORE you hook up that new stator.

The wrong switch wiring could have been what took out the stator....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'll take a look at it and with the info (link) that shows me the different key switches and make certain which one will work on it. I do have the cadet key switch and it was the same one that was with the engine I swapped over into the Craftsman. But this engine was showing signs of failing when it was on the cadet. It just kept getting progressively worse. Thank you again for sharing your expertise and I will be back in here for when I venture into putting that new stator in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here's an update. I had found that with this epidemic going on. The vendor for the part I ordered last night. Had alerted me that they had cancelled my order. Because of the unknown hours that may or maynot be kept at their warehouse. So to anyone out there thinking of ordering parts. Keep it in mind that what you order may be cancelled or back ordered.

In my case,... The engine, a 17.5 Briggs and Stratton that threw a rod and has been replaced with the 17.5 Briggs & Stratton that came off my Cadet ride on mower. I'm betting, actually hoping that the blown engine's stator is fine and will or can be the replacement stator that I can use. I'll report back with pictures and model numbers and whatever else I can think of.
 

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Run the continuity test like you just did. If it checks out... Here's a link to my hero (Taryl) that walks you through the job.That particular stator is different from yours, but the video shows you the old school way of pulling the flywheel with just a pry bar and a BFH....

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Very helpful video. But at the end he was stating about the drain on the battery because of having a PTO. The cadet motor had a PTO hooked up to it. But since I placed it on the Craftsman mower, the craftsman mower never had a PTO, it was manual. So the stator thats in the Cadet motor that is shorted, that is gonna be replaced. Wouldn't the stator from the blown craftsman be an acceptable replacement?
 

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If that stator is good, you'll be fine. The regulator is only going to put as much 12V into the charging system as the battery needs.

What he was talking about was that particular stator.... Notice it went directly into the charging system and not through a regulator. The main take away from the video was how to pull the flywheel, be careful in routing the wires, and never ever trust Ronnie Jergenson:)
 
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