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Old 01-07-2004, 08:59 PM   #1
Live Oak
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4000 Ten Series Engine Block Heater Kit

Now that the cold weather has really hit us; you make have found that your Green machine is a little better cranking when the temps are up. Here is a block heater kit that is for 4210 - 4710 I believe it is also for the 4200 - 4700 series tractors too. Very inexpensive way to reduce wear and tear on your tractor and aid cold starts. It lists for $52.53. Part # AR87167, HEATER,ENG COOLANT, ASSY (FIELD)

<img src="http://jdpc.deere.com/pimages/MP25/MP25214________UN19JUN01.gif">

HEATER,ENG COOLANT, ASSY



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Old 01-07-2004, 09:01 PM   #2
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I forgot to mention that the coolant heater is a threaded plug and can be installed VERY easily with common tools. Just a matter of removing a threaded plug from the block and installing the coolant heater.



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Old 02-04-2004, 07:38 PM   #3
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Well, I installed the block heater today so I wanted to get back to you guys with the lessons learned and feedback for if and when you might want to install one for yourself.

Others I had talked with about the install were indeed correct with respect to the tightness of the engine block drain plug. It was torqued down to about 1.5 zillion ft./lbs. torque and loctite'd in place. I could not budge it with a 2 ft. breaker bar so I used a 5 ft. long piece of pipe and it broke after about 30 degree of wrench arc flexing the breaker bar. Had to take a break to pickup my daughter from the bus stop so I had to take a break.

After getting back from the bus stop, I got right back to work and after a bit of a pain in the ass struggle , the block heater is in! A couple of things I would mention as an After Action Report (AAR as it was called in the Army).

You definitely need a LONG piece of pipe to put on the breaker bar to loosen the block drain plug. As mentioned before have the thread sealer already on the block heater and have it ready to do in when you take out the drain plug. (a note of advice: tightening down the block heater is a ROYAL PAIN IN THE ARSE so test the block heater BEFORE you install it......just a few seconds plugged in to see if it gets warm.....NO MORE than a few second or you can burn it up)

Another thing to do BEFORE you remove the drain plug is to loosen and remove the raditior cap and then reinstall it. If you don't like I did.........you get anti-freeze coming out of the block under pressure. Be REAL FAST with installing the block heater so minimize loosing anti-freeze. It is a little difficult to do this as there is very little room due to hyd. lines, the starter, and the hyd. pump.

Make sure you have a 1 5/16 or metric equivalent wrench to tighten down the block heater; preferable an offset open end head type. My biggest wrench was 1 1/4 so I had to fanaegle (more like half ass it) with a pair of water pump pliers. (I was commited at this point and had no choice. (did not want to leave the hyd. system open like that until I got a special wrench) You may end up removing the starter (which is another PITA) to get a better shot at the block heater to tighten it up.

Removing the clamps from the rubber hyd. pump manifold was not hard but reinstalling them was a bear. Not much room to work with.

I saved the anti-freeze and ran it through a coffee filter and re-used it. (about 2 quarts leaked out when I removed the drain plug. I lost may a 4 - 6 ounces of hyd. oil. The hyd. pump growled a little until it purged itself of air.

My best advice would be.........if you have not purchased the tractor yet........negotitate the block heater in with the purchase price. Otherwise, it is not that bad of a job PROVIDED you have the correct tools.

Transmission oil heater and under belly guard shield kit installation is next!

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Old 02-04-2004, 07:43 PM   #4
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Hey Bo! Have you got a block heater on your 855? Your tractor takes the same block heater as mine.

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Old 02-11-2004, 08:41 PM   #5
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I tested out the block heater today. I use it to preheat the engine prior to start to minimize the smoke and warm up time. If you use it for this purpose; it takes about 1 - 2 hours to warm the engine up nice and toasty in your garage. I left mine plugged in for about 1.5 hours and that was plenty. If you have the tractor outside it may take 2 - 3 hours or more depending upon how cold it is outside. In severe cold weather give it about 4 hours. I would say the $55 is money WELL spent on one these block heaters.

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Old 10-02-2004, 04:33 PM   #6
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Someone else asked me about installing a block heater on a Deere 790 which has a very similar Yanmar engine and here is the reply I gave them. Pretty much covers your questions.

I installed the block heater on my 4410. (very similar engine & same location) You as well have discovered that Yanmar & Deere have a life time contract with Magilla Gorilla, who tightens these threaded plugs. :O) I used a thorsen 24 inch breaker bar and slipped a 4 ft. piece of pipe over the breaker bar. About the instant I thought the breaker bar square drive was going to snap off; the plug snapped loose. It might be of benefit to warm up the engine and let it cool to the point you can work with the coolant without being burned. The rubber hyd. oil manifold is a bit testy to remove but be persistant and gentle. I suggest having the block heater plug all ready to go with sealant on it (I used permatex #2 soft type) and QUICKLY replace the block heater plug in place of the threaded factory plug. Do not drain the coolant. Leave the radiator cap on to hold a vaccum and slow the coolant loss. I lost maybe less than a half pint of coolant this way. (not enough to notice when I checked the level. You will need a set of funky offset wrenches to tighten the plug down as it is in a really bad spot behind the hyd. pump. As much as I hate to use them, I finally had to use a big set of channel lock pliers. Be very gentle and careful as the plug is made of soft brass or bronze. The block heater works great and really aids the warm up time of the tractor. Good luck!

I have not installed the transmission oil heater but my understanding is that the oil must be drained and the plug to the suction screen removed and replaced with the oil heater element. Then refill with oil. If you catch the oil in a clean container, I don't see why you cannot reuse it.

In use, I usually plug in the block heater an hour or so before I start the engine and that is enough to warm the coolant up and make for VERY short warm up times. You may need to plug it in longer in very cold climates. I would think the same applies with the trans oil heater.

As a safety reminder for everyone; under NO circumstances should you use ether to aid cold starts with these tractors as they are equipped with grid heaters that can risk causing an intake manifold explosion.

Hope this was not TMI and it covered all of your questions

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Old 10-23-2004, 10:05 AM   #7
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Heat on the plug may well loosen it up but I would NOT use a torch in that area. It is just way to close to hyd. lines and the rubber hyd. fluid manifold. I would suggest using a heat gun if you can't get the plug to come out.

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Old 10-24-2004, 12:37 PM   #8
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Great feedback! You pretty much installed yours just as I did only I did not have a wrench the proper size.

It sure is nice to be able to plug the tractor in an hour or so before you need it and she warms right up. Otherwise it takes a long time for warm up. Really reduces wear and tear in my opinion.

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Old 10-24-2004, 06:55 PM   #9
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I used a clean lint free rag.

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Old 11-25-2004, 08:25 PM   #10
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Sure is! I get the same thing on the 4410 and the Cummins.

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Old 11-25-2004, 08:29 PM   #11
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Unless you leave the tractor parked outside over night; you should not need to plug in the block heater for more than about 3 hours unless it is extremely cold. Don't leave it plugged in over night; it is just a waste of electric. I plug mine in about an hour or two before I plan to use it. It is plenty warm by then.

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Old 11-26-2004, 09:31 AM   #12
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I don't have the transmission oil heater installed on my 4410. I would be very interested in your observations as to how when and effective it works. I may install one on my next hydro oil and filter change.

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Old 12-12-2013, 09:16 AM   #13
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Very easy to remove the plug if you heat with torches. I just push the wires away as far as I could 3 or so inches, remove the hydraulic manifold also. Heat with cutting tip 30 seconds. If your not to handy with your torches have some water nearby in case.



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